issues2000

Topics in the News: North Korea


Joe Biden on Foreign Policy : Oct 15, 2020
America First means America Alone

We're more isolated in the world than we ever have been. Our "America First" has made "America Alone." You have Iran closer to having enough nuclear material to build a bomb. North Korea has more bombs and missiles available to it. We find ourselves where our NATO allies are publicly saying they can't count on us.

We find ourselves, in the Western Pacific, where we're isolated as well. You have Japan and South Korea at odds with one another. China is making moves. So I would say, we're find ourselves less secure than we've been. I do compliment the president on the deal with Israel recently. But if you take a look, we're not very well trusted around the world. When 17 major nations in the world were asked who they trust more, who's a better leader, and the president came in behind both, the international survey, both behind Putin, as well as Xi. And look what Putin is doing.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: Second 2020 Presidential Debate/ABC Town Hall Philadelphia

Donald Trump on War & Peace : Sep 15, 2020
I'm bringing troops back, when advisers wanted war

I'm bringing our troops back from Afghanistan. I'm bringing our troops back from Iraq. We're almost out of almost every place. You know, everybody said--because of my personality, they said, "he'll be in a war immediately."

Look at North Korea, how that's worked out. We haven't--the sanctions are on. Everything's the same. We haven't spent anything. We're getting along with him. I get along with Kim Jong-un. That was supposed to be a war.

If President Obama were president, if Hillary Clinton ever got in, that would be a war, probably a nuclear war with North Korea. In the meantime, I'm getting calls all the time from friends of mine in South Korea. Thank you. We love you. Thank you. It's really been rather amazing.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: ABC This Week: special edition 2020 Town Hall interview

Joe Biden on Foreign Policy : Feb 25, 2020
Meet with North Korea and China together

Q: How would you deal with North Korea?

BIDEN: You don't negotiate with a dictator, give him legitimacy without any notion whether he is going to do anything at all. You don't do that. Look what happened. [President Trump] gave this dictator--he's a thug--legitimacy. We've weakened the sanctions around the world.

Q: So what would you do?

BIDEN: I would be in Beijing, I would be speaking with Xi Jinping. I would be reassigning the relationship between the Japan and South Korea, and I would make it clear to China, we are going to continue to move closer to make sure that we can, in fact, prevent North Korea from launching missiles to take them down.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: 10th Democratic Primary debate on eve of S.C. primary

Bernie Sanders on War & Peace : Feb 7, 2020
Killing bad leaders leads to international anarchy

There are bad leaders all over the world. Kim Jong-un in North Korea is probably responsible for the death of hundreds of thousands of his people. We cannot go around saying you're a bad guy, we're going to assassinate you. If that happens, you're opening the door to international anarchy that every government in the world will then be subjected to attacks and assassination. What we have got to do is strengthen the State Department and our diplomatic capabilities.
Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: 8th Democrat 2020 primary debate, St. Anselm College in NH

Tom Steyer on Foreign Policy : Jan 14, 2020
Don't meet with North Korea without preconditions or allies

Q: Would you meet with North Korea without any preconditions?

STEYER: No. It's very clear that if we're going to do something with North Korea, we're going to have to do it in concert with our allies, that meeting with him without preconditions is not going anywhere, that the staff can meet to try and see how far we can get. But this is a classic situation where the United States' idea of going it alone makes no sense. And when you are talking about Iran, let's face it. Iran is under great pressure economically. So every single discussion we've had about Iran has had to do with military power and America versus Iran, whereas, in fact, what worked with President Obama was an alliance of our allies and us putting economic pressure on them for them to give up their military tactic. That, to me, is called strategy. Having a goal to make America safer, by looking more broadly than just us, as the policeman of the world spending money.

Click for Tom Steyer on other issues.   Source: 7th Democrat primary debate, on eve of Iowa caucus

Joe Walsh on Foreign Policy : Dec 24, 2019
Steadfastly support NATO

Walsh says he would steadfastly support the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), which Trump has repeatedly criticized. Walsh claims that Trump "bear hugs" the leaders of adversarial states such as Russia and North Korea while he "stiff-arms our allies."

Walsh emphasizes the benefits of traditional U.S. alliances and criticizes President Trump for undermining long-standing relationships. Walsh says Trump "embarrasses our allies" and "embraces tyrants abroad."

Click for Joe Walsh on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2020 presidential hopefuls

Mike Bloomberg on War & Peace : Dec 24, 2019
No attractive military option against North Korean nukes

Bloomberg's brief comments on North Korea have focused on the need for strong U.S. alliances, which he says Trump has weakened. He says that dealing with a "rogue state" such as North Korea requires close relationships with other countries in the region, and that Trump has undermined U.S. alliances. He says there is no "attractive" military option for responding to North Korea's nuclear program.
Click for Mike Bloomberg on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2019 Democratic primary

Kamala Harris on Foreign Policy : Nov 20, 2019
Trump got punked by North Korea

Q: North Korea is threatening to cancel any future summits if President Trump does not make concessions on nuclear weapons. Would you make concessions to Kim Jong-un?

HARRIS: With all due deference to the fact that this is presidential debate, Donald Trump got punked. He has conducted foreign policy out of a very fragile ego that fails to understand that one of the most important responsibilities of the commander-in-chief is to concern herself with the security of our nation and homeland. And to do it in a way that understands that part of the strength of who we are as a nation is not only that we have a vibrant military, but that we are respected because we keep to our word, we are consistent, we speak truth, and we are loyal.

Q: But would you make concessions to North Korea to keep talks going?

HARRIS: Not at this point. There are no concessions to be made. Trump has traded a photo-op for nothing. Trump has compromised our ability to have a check on North Korea's nuclear program.

Click for Kamala Harris on other issues.   Source: November Democratic primary debate in Atlanta

Julian Castro on Foreign Policy : Oct 15, 2019
North Korea won't work with US after ditching Iran nuke deal

If you're Kim Jong Un why in the world would you believe anything that this President says to contain your nuclear weapons program when he tore up an Iran nuclear agreement that we just signed four years ago, which was the strongest agreement to contain Iran's nuclear weapons program, and now he's abandoned the very people that we gave our word to?
Click for Julian Castro on other issues.   Source: October Democratic CNN/NYTimes Primary debate

Bill Weld on War & Peace : Oct 3, 2019
Partial sanction relief for partial Korean denuclearization

Q: Would you sign an agreement with North Korea that entailed partial sanctions relief in exchange for some dismantling of its nuclear weapons program but not full denuclearization?

A: "Partial" and "some" imply matters of degree, but yes, I think a partial dismantling of North Korea's nuclear weapons program is a development worth promoting, and of course such an agreement might prove to be the first step to a fuller resolution.

Click for Bill Weld on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2020 presidential hopefuls

Julian Castro on Foreign Policy : Sep 12, 2019
Pressure China on human rights for Uighurs

Q: How would you pressure China?

CASTRO: I would immediately begin to negotiate with China to ratchet down that trade war. We have leverage there.

I also believe that we need to return to a leader when it comes to things like human rights. We have millions of Uighurs, for instance, in China that right now are being imprisoned and mistreated.

And in North Korea, this president is elevating a dictator. We need to stop that. We need to return to ensuring that America leads again on human rights.

Click for Julian Castro on other issues.   Source: September Democratic Primary debate in Houston

Marianne Williamson on War & Peace : Aug 16, 2019
North Korea: Partial sanction relief for some disarming

Sanctions are a form of economic warfare with a high rate of failure. We can achieve superior outcomes with clear-eyed respect and steps towards thawing the ice. This could help improve our relationship with Kim Jong Un and de-escalate threats from North Korea. Action might include partial sanctions relief in exchange for some serious dismantling of their nuclear weapons program, as steps towards de-escalation and improved relations.
Click for Marianne Williamson on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2020 presidential primary

Andrew Yang on War & Peace : Aug 9, 2019
Need to accept incremental gains on N. Korea nukes

You can't find solutions to problems if you're not willing to talk. I would engage with North Korea without preconditions in order to find a path towards complete, verifiable, and irreversible denuclearization. We can't leave any options off the table, and we need to accept incremental gains in order to reach our eventual goal.
Click for Andrew Yang on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2020 presidential primary

Seth Moulton on War & Peace : Jul 30, 2019
Interim agreement with North Korea would be step forward

Given that North Korea has a progressing nuclear program, we must work toward an interim agreement that halts North Korea's program in exchange for limited sanctions relief. We don't yet know whether the North Koreans would agree to any deal that dismantles their nuclear program in exchange for significant economic incentives. We need to test that proposition while halting Pyongyang's progress, and an interim agreement would do just that.
Click for Seth Moulton on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2020 presidential primary

Steve Bullock on War & Peace : Jul 30, 2019
We need nuclear deterrence against North Korea and others

Sen. Elizabeth WARREN [to Bullock]: We don't expand trust around the world by saying [like Bullock], "You know, we might be the first ones to use a nuclear weapon." That puts the entire world at risk. At a time when Donald Trump is pulling out of our nuclear negotiations, expanding the opportunities for nuclear proliferation around the world, the world gets closer and closer to nuclear warfare.

BULLOCK: I agree [that] we need to get back to nuclear de-proliferation. But at the same time, when you actually have Korea; when you have others, I don't want to turn around and say, "Well, Detroit has to be gone before we would ever use that." When so many crazy folks are getting closer to having a nuclear weapon, I don't want them to think I could strike this country and I and we as the United States of America wouldn't do a thing. Part of the strength really is the ability to deter.

Click for Steve Bullock on other issues.   Source: July Democratic Primary debate (first night in Detroit)

Pete Buttigieg on War & Peace : Jul 30, 2019
N. Korea: Step-by-step process for peace & denuclearization

We have to accept that denuclearization will not happen overnight and will require a sustained, step-by-step approach spanning a significant number of years. I believe the most realistic way to get there is a framework for complete, verifiable denuclearization and peace on the Korean Peninsula that is comprehensive in scope, with steps on both fronts implemented step-by-step and in tandem.
Click for Pete Buttigieg on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2020 presidential primary

Joe Sestak on War & Peace : Jul 30, 2019
North Korean denuclearization will be incremental

We must maintain the goal of complete denuclearization, but that does not mean I think we will be able to quickly reach an agreement. Negotiations will likely lead to some sort of preliminary agreement involving partial sanctions relief in exchange for some dismantling of the North's nuclear weapons program. The eventual success of that initial deal should lay the groundwork for total denuclearization, along with some improvements to North Korea's human rights standards.
Click for Joe Sestak on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2020 presidential primary

Amy Klobuchar on Foreign Policy : Jun 30, 2019
Talking to North Korea good, working with allies better

We want to see a denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, a reduction in these missiles. But it is not as easy as just going and bringing a hot dish over the fence to the dictator next door. You have to have clear focus and a clear mission and clear goals. It is always good to talk to people when you're dealing with something so important as nuclear weapons. But then we have no clear path and nothing comes out of it. I would think working with our allies would make it better.
Click for Amy Klobuchar on other issues.   Source: CNN State of the Union 2019 interview

Amy Klobuchar on Foreign Policy : Jun 30, 2019
Diplomacy with North Korea not easy; we need clear focus

Of course, we want to see a denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, a reduction in these missiles. But it is not as easy as just going and bringing a hot dish over the fence to the dictator next door. This is a ruthless dictator. You have to have clear focus and a clear mission and clear goals. The president will meet with him. That is fine. But then we have no clear path and nothing comes out of it.
Click for Amy Klobuchar on other issues.   Source: CNN "SOTU" 2019 interview series

Beto O`Rourke on Foreign Policy : Jun 30, 2019
Diplomacy should yield results: none yet with North Korea!

I would continue diplomacy contingent on progress that keeps this country and our allies safe. Despite three years of almost bizarre foreign policy, this country is no safer when it comes to North Korea. They have removed none of their nuclear weapons or their potential to deliver them to the United States. In contravention of the United Nations they have launched other missiles flouting the diplomacy that this President has attempted so far. We've added legitimacy to Kim Jong-un.
Click for Beto O`Rourke on other issues.   Source: CBS Face the Nation 2019 interview series

Beto O`Rourke on Foreign Policy : Jun 30, 2019
Would talk to North Korea, but only if it gets results

I would continue diplomacy contingent on progress that keeps this country and our allies safe. Despite three years of almost bizarre foreign policy from this President, this country is no safer when it comes to North Korea. They have removed none of their nuclear weapons. We've added legitimacy to Kim Jong-un. I want to make sure that we pursue diplomatic, peaceful, nonviolent negotiations to resolve the challenges that we face on the Korean Peninsula and ensure that we denuclearize that area.
Click for Beto O`Rourke on other issues.   Source: CBS Face the Nation 2019 interview

Bernie Sanders on Foreign Policy : Jun 30, 2019
Talk to adversaries but we need more than photo ops

I have no problem with [Trump] sitting down with Kim Jong-un in North Korea or any place else. But I don't want it simply to be a photo opportunity, the whole world's media was attracted there. What's going to happen tomorrow and the next day? He has weakened the State Department. If we're going to bring peace to this world, we need a strong State Department, we need to move forward diplomatically, not just do photo opportunities.
Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: ABC This Week 2019 interview

Julian Castro on Foreign Policy : Jun 30, 2019
No preparation is why North Korea talks have done little

I'm always for speaking to our adversaries. A lot of staff work goes into preparing a meeting like this, so that concrete terms are on the table and you can get something out of the meeting. North Korea has not abided by what it promised, which was to produce an inventory of their weapons stockpile, so that there could be a baseline for further talks. I'm not quite sure why this president is so bent on elevating a dictator. It has been a failure so far.
Click for Julian Castro on other issues.   Source: CNN State of the Union 2019 interview

Amy Klobuchar on War & Peace : Jun 30, 2019
Talking to enemies good if there's results; Trump has none

Q: Do you support President Trump's meetings with the leader of North Korea?

Klobuchar: You always have to talk to everyone when it is American security and the world's security at stake. But he keeps having these summits and meetings that really don't produce anything. what This is about is making sure that there are measurable results, that we have a plan when we go in there and we just haven't seen that.

Q: Would you accept North Korea as a nuclear power?

Klobuchar: No, I would not. What I am saying is you need to have steps and measures. Talk is good, but if all it is, is talk it doesn't produce anything for national security for America and international security for our allies.

Click for Amy Klobuchar on other issues.   Source: CBS Face the Nation 2019 interview

Amy Klobuchar on War & Peace : Jun 30, 2019
Would not accept North Korea as nuclear power

Q: Would you accept North Korea as a nuclear power?

KLOBUCHAR: No, I would not. What I am saying is you need to have steps and measures. You have dates and you have times and you have a focus and you have a plan. Talk is good, but if all it is, is talk it doesn't produce anything for national security for America and international security for our allies.

Click for Amy Klobuchar on other issues.   Source: CBS Face the Nation 2019 interview series

Kamala Harris on Foreign Policy : Jun 27, 2019
Trump embracing Korean & Russian dictators is a threat

Q: What is the greatest national security threat to the United States?

A: It's Donald Trump. You want to talk about North Korea, a real threat in terms of nuclear arsenal, but what does he do? He embraces Kim Jong-un, a dictator, for the sake of a photo op. Putin--you want to talk about Russia? He takes the word of the Russian president over the word of the American intelligence community when it comes to a threat to our democracy and our elections.

Click for Kamala Harris on other issues.   Source: June Democratic Primary debate (second night in Miami)

Joe Sestak on Foreign Policy : Jun 23, 2019
Reverse America's retreat from the global community

Click for Joe Sestak on other issues.   Source: 2020 presidential campaign website JoeSestak.com

Pete Buttigieg on War & Peace : Jun 11, 2019
Small steps forward in North Korea; no "love letters"

So rather than a zero-sum insistence on full and complete denuclearization before any peace is possible, we can recognize that the two processes can be mutually reinforcing, with small steps leading to bigger ones. You will not see me exchanging love letters on White House letterhead with a brutal dictator who starves and murders his own people. But you will see my administration work to create the conditions that would make it possible to welcome North Korea into the international community.
Click for Pete Buttigieg on other issues.   Source: 2020 presidential campaign website, PeteForAmerica.com

Steve Bullock on Free Trade : May 15, 2019
End reckless trade war with China

Bullock has criticized President Donald Trump for his "reckless" trade war with China, which has hit farmers in rural states like Montana particularly hard. As governor, Bullock led trade missions to China, South Korea and Taiwan. He is largely viewed as pro-business and has advocated for cautious government spending. As governor, Bullock launched economic initiatives aimed at boosting local businesses and economic productivity in rural communities.
Click for Steve Bullock on other issues.   Source: PBS News Hour 2020, "Where the candidate stands on 9 issues"

Mike Pence on War & Peace : Apr 17, 2019
North Korea must abandon its nuclear ambitions

"But the era of strategic patience is over," he declared. "President Trump has made it clear that the patience of the United States and our allies in this region has run out and we want to see change. We want to see North Korea abandon its reckless path of the development of nuclear weapons, and also its continual use and testing of ballistic missiles is unacceptable."
Click for Mike Pence on other issues.   Source: PBS Newshour "North Korea," on 2020 presidential hopefuls

Mike Gravel on War & Peace : Apr 9, 2019
Withdraw all troops from South Korea; normalize with North

The primary responsibility for achieving a lasting peace on the Peninsula rests with the Korean people and their respective governments. This is--first and foremost--their dispute to settle. As the overwhelmingly more powerful party, the U.S. has a responsibility to make every effort to de-escalate tensions to enable the two Koreas to reach an amicable outcome to current and future talks.
Click for Mike Gravel on other issues.   Source: 2020 Presidential campaign website MikeGravel.com

Donald Trump on War & Peace : Mar 8, 2019
Countries hosting US troops should pay for them

The administration is drawing up demands that Germany, Japan and any other country hosting U.S. troops pay the full price of American soldiers deployed on their soil--plus 50 percent or more for the privilege of hosting them. His insistence on it almost derailed recent talks with South Korea over the status of 28,000 U.S. troops in the country when he overruled his negotiators with a note to National Security Advisor John Bolton saying, "We want cost plus 50."
Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Bloomberg News, "Huge Premium" on 2020 presidential hopefuls

Howard Schultz on Foreign Policy : Feb 12, 2019
China is not an ally, but we need to work with them

I don't believe China is our ally. But I also do not believe China is our enemy. China is a fierce competitor of the United States. There are areas that are in our national interest to cooperate with China. We need China's cooperation to help solve the problem of North Korea. We need China's cooperation specifically with lots of other nations, with regard to doing everything we can to solve the climate change issue.
Click for Howard Schultz on other issues.   Source: CNN Town Hall: 2020 presidential hopefuls

Donald Trump on War & Peace : Feb 5, 2019
My good relationship with North Korea has prevented war

We continue our historic push for peace on the Korean Peninsula. Our hostages have come home, nuclear testing has stopped, and there has not been a missile launch in 15 months. If I had not been elected President, we would right now, be in a war with North Korea with potentially millions of people killed. My relationship with Kim Jong Un is a good one.
Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: 2019 State of the Union address to United States Congress

Pete Buttigieg on Foreign Policy : Feb 3, 2019
Pay attention to assessments of intelligence agencies

Q: Would you meet with Kim Jong-un?

A: I think it would make more sense to have that happen in a framework of concrete achievements. You don't just get to have a meeting, declare the nuclear threat to be over, then wind up being embarrassed and contradicted by your own intelligence chiefs. As a military officer serving overseas, I was part of the intelligence community. And there is not a more reality-based group of people in this country. You actually have to understand and legitimize and take seriously their assessments before you have any business having a one-on-one with the leader of a hostile foreign power like North Korea.

Click for Pete Buttigieg on other issues.   Source: ABC This Week 2019 interviews for 2020 Democratic primary

Tulsi Gabbard on Foreign Policy : Jan 20, 2019
Defends meeting Syria's Assad; supports Trump on North Korea

Q: You met with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad during that trip to Syria in 2017...

A: It continues to be very important for any leader in this country to be willing to meet with others, whether they be friends or adversaries or potential adversaries, if we are serious about the pursuit of peace and securing our country. It's why I have urged and continue to urge President Trump to meet with people like Kim Jong-un in North Korea, because we understand what's at stake here.

Click for Tulsi Gabbard on other issues.   Source: CNN 2019 "State of the Union" on 2020 Presidential hopefuls

Donald Trump on Foreign Policy : Sep 25, 2018
Reject ideology of globalism; embrace doctrine of patriotism

President Donald Trump blamed Iranian leaders for sowing "chaos, death and destruction" in a steely speech to the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday that heavily emphasized the president's support of national sovereignty over globalism.

Touting his meeting this year with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and blasting Iran for spreading mayhem in the Middle East, Trump offered an impassioned defense of a foreign policy doctrine he said would allow countries to reject "global governance."

"We reject the ideology of globalism, and we embrace the doctrine of patriotism," Trump said. "We will never surrender America's sovereignty to an unelected, unaccountable, global bureaucracy."

Trump's remarks were buffeted by warnings from other world leaders that America's pullback from the international institutions was ill-conceived and even dangerous. "Do not accept the erosion of multilateralism. Don't accept our history unraveling," the President of France said.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: USA Today on Trump Administration UN Speech

Mike Pence on War & Peace : Sep 9, 2018
Progress toward denuclearization & peace on Korean Peninsula

Q: Is diplomacy stalled on North Korea?

PENCE: We're making progress restoring American strength in the world, seeing the opportunity for peace emerge on the Korean Peninsula. We're expecting a letter from Kim Jong-un communicating his reaffirmation of his commitment to denuclearization. No more nuclear tests. No more missile tests. Our hostages are home. That's all the result of the President's leadership.

Q: But the Secretary of State called off his visit?

PENCE: The President canceled the meeting a week ago because he wasn't seeing enough progress in denuclearization that that may well have resulted in what Kim Jong-un communicated to a South Korean envoy just last week, and we're anticipating the letter from Kim Jong-un and all the while our sanctions remain in place.

Click for Mike Pence on other issues.   Source: CBS Face the Nation 2018 interviews of 2020 hopefuls

John Kasich on War & Peace : Jun 6, 2018
Keep up pressure on North Korea to give up nukes

North Korea's acquisition of nuclear weapons remains another major concern. Until we have a definitive, verifiable treaty that formally ends the Korean War and denuclearizes the Korean Peninsula, we will need to keep up the pressure on Pyongyang to relinquish its nuclear weapons. Additional sanctions can and should be put in place. That includes sanctions on large Chinese companies that enable North Korea's nuclear weapons program. North Koreans who are working overseas to earn the regime the hard currency that funds that program should be sent home on an expedited basis. The US & its allies should also put in place a much tighter counterproliferation regime on shipments going into or out of North Korea. Ultimately, however, it will take peaceful regime change in Pyongyang to resolve the nuclear threat North Korea poses in Northeast Asia. The country best positioned to facilitate such a change is China, provided it can be sure that the US, South Korea, and Japan will not exploit the situation.
Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: 2020 presidential hopeful Kasich column in Foreign Affairs

John Kasich on War & Peace : Jun 3, 2018
Talk with North Korea, but reimpose sanctions if no results

Q: President Trump is planning a meeting with North Korea--your thoughts?

KASICH: I'm worried about our foreign policy. I'm very, very concerned about this upcoming meeting with North Korea. I think we have to be extremely careful. Every time we have entered an agreement, they have backed away from it, they have misled us, and we cannot let the pressure up on North Korea. So, you know, promises don't matter. To me, it has to be a verifiable agreement. And if we relax these sanctions at all, we ought to be committed to being able to reimpose them if the North Koreans break their word. If you let the pressure up, I am very, very fearful that we will just find ourselves in this same situation or worse situation down the road. I'm glad they're talking. I'm glad they're meeting. But don't let the pressure up until we get verifiable results. Anything other than that will weaken our position and strengthen them. And we know what the history of that regime is.

Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: CBS Face the Nation 2018 interviews of 2020 hopefuls

Arvin Vohra on Free Trade : Mar 30, 2018
Eliminate all tariffs, sanctions, & trade restrictions

Q: Do you support or oppose free trade?

A: Strongly support. If elected, I will sponsor legislation to eliminate all tariffs, sanctions, & trade restrictions. I want North Korean businesses to learn about American culture and spread that knowledge in North Korea, so that the people there see something better than the communism they currently face. I want them to see the wonders created by free market capitalism. I want to spread American culture through trade, not waste effort on sanctions and war.

Click for Arvin Vohra on other issues.   Source: OnTheIssues interview of 2018 Maryland Senate candidate

Mike Pence on War & Peace : Feb 22, 2018
America stands up to North Korea and murderous dictatorships

You know, for all the media fawning over the sister of the North Korean dictator, I think it's important that every American knows who this person is and what she's done. The sister of Kim Jong-un is a central pillar of the most tyrannical and oppressive regime on the planet--an evil family clique that brutalizes, subjugates, starves, and imprisons its 25 million people. I say: The United States of America doesn't stand with murderous dictatorships. We stand up to murderous dictatorships. And we will keep standing strong until North Korea stops threatening our country, our allies, or until they abandon their nuclear and ballistic missiles once and for all.
Click for Mike Pence on other issues.   Source: Speech at the 2018 CPAC Convention

Donald Trump on Foreign Policy : Jan 30, 2018
Sanctions on Communist dictators in North Korea & Cuba

My Administration has imposed tough sanctions on the communist and socialist dictatorships in Cuba and Venezuela. But no regime has oppressed its own citizens more totally or brutally than the cruel dictatorship in North Korea.

North Korea's reckless pursuit of nuclear missiles could very soon threaten our homeland. We are waging a campaign of maximum pressure to prevent that from happening.

Past experience has taught us that complacency and concessions only invite aggression and provocation. I will not repeat the mistakes of past administrations that got us into this dangerous position. We need only look at the depraved character of the North Korean regime to understand the nature of the nuclear threat it could pose to America and our allies.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: 2018 State of the Union address

Tulsi Gabbard on Foreign Policy : May 27, 2017
Skeptical of Iran nuclear deal

Gabbard told Fox News she was "cynical" toward the pact and agreed with host Greta van Susteren that it was akin to Neville Chamberlain's infamous Munich agreement with Hitler in 1938. On the day the agreement was finalized, she issued a statement saying, "We cannot afford to make the same mistake with Iran that was made with North Korea," citing North Korea's abrogation of the Agreed Framework agreement it had signed in 1994.
Click for Tulsi Gabbard on other issues.   Source: Jacobin Mag., "Not your friend": 2020 presidential hopefuls

John Kasich on War & Peace : Apr 28, 2017
Eradicate leadership of North Korea but no military strike

Kasich says he knows how to tackle the issue of North Korea: take out leader Kim Jong Un and his allies. "I believe the best way to solve this problem is to eradicate the leadership," Kasich said. "There are ways in which that can be achieved."

Kasich said that other options that the Trump team seems to be pursuing, including a military strike against the nation, would result in a major loss of lives. "Moving big warships in and having a war, I don't think that's going to work," he said. "Too much loss of life. We are getting very serious that they cannot have an ICBM," Kasich said.

In order to avoid the devastating loss, he said the US could "remove a number of the top people and have a more benign leadership there that understands what's at risk."

When asked if the US should do this militarily, Kasich responded, "You have to have very good intelligence. I don't want to say any more than that, but that's what I believe we need to do, as opposed to a full military strike."

Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: CNN's Caroline Kenny on 2020 presidential hopefuls

Donald Trump on War & Peace : Mar 2, 2017
North Korea has no economic future if they retain nukes

We've made a lot of progress, and we'll continue to make progress. And I really think what we're doing there is very important. But we actually had to walk, but I think we had a very good meeting. In fact, when I came home, they put out a statement that, actually, they were willing to do much less on the sanction front. But you see, that's not what happened there. So already, I think we're negotiating. And I'll tell you this: North Korea has an incredible, brilliant economic future, if they make a deal. But they don't have any economic future if they have nuclear weapons. It's really a bad thing for them. So we'll see how it all goes. But I think it's going well. I think we learned a lot over the last couple of days.
Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Speech at the 2019 CPAC Convention

Donald Trump on War & Peace : Jan 2, 2017
Disallow North Korea from developing nuclear delivery system

President-elect Donald Trump tweeted that North Korea won't reach the final stages of developing a nuclear weapon that will be able to hit the United States: "North Korea just stated that it is in the final stages of developing a nuclear weapon capable of reaching parts of the U.S. It won't happen!" the president-elect wrote.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un said during his annual New Year's address that preparations for launching an intercontinental ballistic missile have "reached the final stage." The development came after the country claims it tested its first hydrogen bomb last year.

North Korea, which has been at odds with the United States since the start of the Korean War in 1950, first tested a nuclear weapon in 2006. A nuclear test was conducted last year on Jan. 6.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Politico.com analysis of 2017 Trump transition Twitter post

Mike Pence on War & Peace : Oct 4, 2016
Peace with North Korea through US strength

Q: How would you prevent North Korea from developing a nuclear-armed missile?

PENCE: We need to rebuild our military, including modernizing our nuclear forces. We need an effective American diplomacy that will marshal the resources of nations in the Asian Pacific Rim to put pressure on North Korea, on Kim Jong-un, to abandon his nuclear ambitions. When Donald Trump is president, we're not going to have the world flouting American power. We're going back to the days of peace through strength.

KAINE: You asked the question about how deal with a North Korea. I'm on the Foreign Relations Committee. We just did an extensive sanctions package against North Korea. The U.N. followed and did this -- virtually the same package. Often China will use their veto in the Security Council to veto a package like that. They're starting to get worried about North Korea, too. So they actually supported the sanctions package, even though many of the sanctions are against Chinese firms.

Click for Mike Pence on other issues.   Source: 2016 Vice-Presidential Debate at Longwood University

Hillary Clinton on Foreign Policy : Sep 26, 2016
Honor treaties with South Korea & Japan: our word is good

TRUMP: We defend Japan, we defend Germany, we defend South Korea, we defend Saudi Arabia, we defend countries. They do not pay us. But they should be paying us, because we are providing tremendous service and we're losing a fortune. We can't defend Japan, a behemoth, selling us cars by the million. They may have to defend themselves or they have to help us out.

CLINTON: Let me start by saying, words matter. Words matter when you run for president. And they really matter when you are president. And I want to reassure our allies in Japan and South Korea and elsewhere that we have mutual defense treaties and we will honor them. It is essential that America's word be good. And so I know that this campaign has caused some questioning and worries on the part of many leaders across the globe. I've talked with a number of them. But I want to--on behalf of myself, and I think on behalf of a majority of the American people, say that, you know, our word is good.

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: First 2016 Presidential Debate at Hofstra University

Hillary Clinton on Foreign Policy : Sep 26, 2016
For long-term US policy against nuclear proliferation

Trump: I agree with her on one thing. The single greatest problem the world has is nuclear weapons.

Clinton: Donald has said he didn't care if other nations got nuclear weapons, Japan, South Korea, even Saudi Arabia. It has been the policy of the US to do everything we could to reduce the proliferation of nuclear weapons. His cavalier attitude about nuclear weapons is deeply troubling. That is the number-one threat we face. It becomes particularly threatening if terrorists ever get their hands on any nuclear material. A man who can be provoked by a tweet should not have his fingers anywhere near the nuclear codes.

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: First 2016 Presidential Debate at Hofstra University

Donald Trump on Homeland Security : Sep 26, 2016
We defend Germany, Japan, Saudi Arabia: they need to pay

TRUMP: We defend Japan, we defend Germany, we defend South Korea, we defend Saudi Arabia, we defend countries. They do not pay us. But they should be paying us, because we are providing tremendous service and we're losing a fortune. It's very possible that if they don't pay a fair share, because this isn't 40 years ago where we could do what we're doing. We can't defend Japan, a behemoth, selling us cars by the million. They may have to defend themselves or they have to help us out. We're a country that owes $20 trillion. They have to help us out.

CLINTON: I want to reassure our allies in Japan and South Korea and elsewhere that we have mutual defense treaties and we will honor them. It is essential that America's word be good. On behalf of a majority of the American people, I want to say that our word is good.

TRUMP: And as far as Japan is concerned, I want to help all of our allies, but we are losing billions and billions of dollars. We cannot be the policemen of the world.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: First 2016 Presidential Debate at Hofstra University

Donald Trump on Homeland Security : Aug 23, 2016
South Korea and Japan should pay 100% of US military costs

The news coming out of the meeting was about Trump saying that maybe the United States didn't need to put so much money into NATO, the core of the European-American security alliance since the Cold War-- the kind of statement that might win nods or applause at a rally, but sparked shock and ridicule in the corridors of think tanks and policy shops in Washington.

"NATO was set up when we were a richer country," Trump said. "We're not a rich country. We're borrowing, we're borrowing all of this money."

But you do know, editorial writer Charles Lane said, that South Korea and Japan pay half of the administrative cost of keeping the American military in those countries, right?

"Fifty percent?" Trump asked.

"Yeah," Lane confirmed.

"Why isn't it one hundred percent?"

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Trump Revealed, by Michael Kranish & Mark Fisher, p. 11

Mike Pence on Principles & Values : Jul 20, 2016
My family lived the American dream

I grew up on the front row of the American dream. My grandfather immigrated to this country. I was raised in a small town in southern Indiana, in a big family with a cornfield in the backyard. When I was young, I watched my mom and dad build everything that matters. A family, a business, a good name. I was raised to believe in hard work, in faith, and family. My dad was a combat veteran in Korea. My dad ran gas stations in our small town and was a great father.
Click for Mike Pence on other issues.   Source: Speech at the 2016 Republican National Convention

Mike Pence on Free Trade : Jul 14, 2016
Supports TPP and trade agreements with Pacific Rim and China

Before he became Trump's vice-presidential nominee, Mike Pence supported every free-trade agreement that came before him. That record puts him squarely at odds with Trump on one of the signature issues of the businessman's presidential campaign. Pence wrote, "Reducing tariffs and other trade barriers is something that Congress must do. I encourage your support for any trade-related measures when they are brought before the Congress."
Click for Mike Pence on other issues.   Source: Washington Post, "Huge supporter," on 2016 Veepstakes

Bill Weld on Foreign Policy : Jul 7, 2016
Focus on nuclear proliferation & the Sunni-Shia schism

Q: You've said the Islamic State is not a existential threat to the U.S.so what are the top three things you worry about?

JOHNSON: Well, that ISIS is a very real threat, but I think their days are numbered, they are regional.

WELD: My #1 would be nuclear proliferation, which is why I think it's unbelievable that Donald Trump has suggested that the South Koreans and the Japanese perhaps should have access to nuclear weapons. Religious sectarianism, the Sunni-Shia schism around the world is pretty high on the list, as well. We don't think about it here every day, but, you know, when you're considering actions like Iraq, actions that we've taken in the Middle East and North Africa, you've got to think about things like that as well that have rippling effects in a number of different countries, all across the top of Africa, for example.

Click for Bill Weld on other issues.   Source: Washington Post interview of Johnson & Weld on 2016 election

Bill Weld on Homeland Security : Jun 22, 2016
Nuclear proliferation is #1 threat to world security

[Trump's hard line on immigration] is not the limit of the really unreasonable foreign policy proposals by the presumptive Republican nominee. The notion of having Japan and South Korea have access to nuclear weapons is crazy in a world where nuclear proliferation is the number-one threat to the security of the world. The notion that he is going to impose huge penalties on Mexico and China at will violates our obligations under treaties and international agreements like the World Trade Organization.
Click for Bill Weld on other issues.   Source: CNN Libertarian Town Hall: joint interview of Johnson & Weld

Donald Trump on Foreign Policy : Apr 1, 2016
Develop nukes in South Korea & Japan to counter North Korea

At the Nuclear Security Summit, the president was asked for his reaction to Trump's suggestion that US allies Japan and South Korea manufacture their own nuclear weapons as a defense against North Korean aggression. Obama said the comments "tell us the person who made the statements doesn't know much about nuclear policy, or the Korean Peninsula or the world generally." White House aides pointed out that Trump's policy would reverse decades of bipartisan US foreign policy and would increase nuclear proliferation.

Trump has argued that allowing Japan and South Korea to get the weapons would relieve the US of defending their East Asia allies. Foreign leaders from both countries have dismissed the idea. "You have so many countries already--China, Pakistan, you have so many countries, Russia--you have so many countries right now that have them," Trump said during a CNN town hall. "Now, wouldn't you rather, in a certain sense, have Japan have nuclear weapons when North Korea has nuclear weapons?"

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: NBC News, "Nuclear Weapons," by Andrew Rafferty

John Kasich on Foreign Policy : Feb 25, 2016
Chinese are best way to calm down North Korea

We should be intercepting the ships that are leaving North Korea. Secondly, the same goes with the aircraft. Thirdly, we need to slap even tougher sanctions on North Korea. We ought to talk about arming South Korea and Japan with ballistic missile technology. The Chinese are the best way to calm that regime down and get them in a position of where they back off.
Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: 2016 CNN-Telemundo Republican debate on eve of Texas primary

John Kasich on Homeland Security : Feb 25, 2016
$100B more to rebuild the military, with Pentagon reforms

KASICH: I would love to see regime change in North Korea. We have to be firm, and we've got to unite people in that part of the world to stand firmly against North Korea, and make sure we have the ballistic missile technology to defend ourselves.

TRUMP: We can no longer defend all of these countries, Japan, Germany, South Korea. You order televisions, you order almost anything, you're getting it from these countries. They are making a fortune. We defend all of these countries for peanuts. You talk about budgets. We have to start getting reimbursed for taking care of the military services for all of these countries.

KASICH: We're in agreement that the Japanese need to do more. We're in agreement that the Europeans need to do more. But, at the same time, we have to rebuild the military. I have a balanced budget plan that cuts taxes, reforms regulations, but also builds the military, puts a $100 billion dollars more in defense.

Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: 2016 CNN-Telemundo Republican debate on eve of Texas primary

Donald Trump on Homeland Security : Feb 25, 2016
Charge rich countries like Germany more to defend them

KASICH: We're in agreement that the Japanese need to do more. We're in agreement that the Europeans need to do more. But, at the same time, we have to rebuild the military. I have a balanced budget plan that cuts taxes, reforms regulations, but also builds the military, puts a $100 billion dollars more in defense.

TRUMP: We can no longer defend all of these countries, Japan, Germany, South Korea. You order televisions, you order almost anything, you're getting it from these countries. They are making a fortune. We defend all of these countries for peanuts. You talk about budgets. We have to start getting reimbursed for taking care of the military services for all of these countries.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: 2016 CNN-Telemundo Republican debate on eve of Texas primary

Donald Trump on Foreign Policy : Feb 10, 2016
China should make Kim Jong Un disappear

Trump was asked how he would respond to North Korea's nuclear threat. "I would get China to make that guy disappear in one form or another very quickly," Trump said. He didn't clarify whether disappearing was equivalent to being assassinated but said, "Well, I've heard of worse things, frankly."

"I mean, this guy's a bad dude, and don't underestimate him," Trump said, referring to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. "Any young guy who can take over from his father with all those generals and everybody else that probably want the position, this is not somebody to be underestimated."

Trump maintained that China has control over North Korea and the US has control over China--thus "China should do that," he said. "China has control--absolute control--over North Korea. They don't say it, but they do," Trump explained. "And they should make that problem disappear. China is sucking us dry. They're taking our money. They're taking our jobs. We have rebuilt China with what they've taken out."

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Nolan McCaskill on Politico.com

Bernie Sanders on Foreign Policy : Feb 4, 2016
North Korea is run by nuclear-armed paranoid dictator

North Korea is an isolated country run by a handful of dictators, or maybe just one, who seems to be somewhat paranoid. And, who had nuclear weapons. Our goal there is to work and lean strongly on China to put pressure. China is one of the few major countries in the world that has significant support for North Korea, and we got to do everything we can to put pressure on China. I worry about an isolated, paranoid country with atomic bombs.
Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: MSNBC Democratic primary debate in New Hampshire

Bernie Sanders on Foreign Policy : Feb 4, 2016
I worry about Putin in Crimea but worry more about N. Korea

Q: Secretary of Defence Ash Carter said Russia is the most important national security threat. Do you agree?

SANDERS: No I don't. I worry about Putin and his military adventurism in the Crimea, but I worry more about an isolated country. Russia lives in the world. China lives in the world. North Korea is a strange country because it is so isolated, and I do feel that a nation with nuclear weapons, they have got to be dealt with.

Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: MSNBC Democratic primary debate in New Hampshire

Donald Trump on Foreign Policy : Jan 14, 2016
China totally controls North Korea; they're just taunting us

Without China, North Korea doesn't even eat. China is ripping us on trade. They're devaluing their currency and they're killing our companies. We've lost between four and seven million jobs because of China. What I said then was, "we have very unfair trade with China. We're going to have a trade deficit of 505 billion dollars this year with China. I would start taxing goods that come in from China.
Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Fox Business Republican 2-tier debate

Bernie Sanders on Foreign Policy : Jan 7, 2016
Lean on China to deal with North Korea

Q: North Korea claims to have exploded another nuclear bomb, perhaps a hydrogen bomb. If you were in the Oval Office, what would you do about it?

SANDERS: First of all, we're going to have to lean on China. China is North Korea's closest ally. They're gonna have to push North Korea to start adhering to international agreements.

Q: How do we lean on China?

SANDERS: We have a relationship with China. China is equally concerned about what North Korea is doing. North Korea is a paranoid, isolated nation. When you have a hydrogen bomb, if that's true, you're a threat to China as well.

Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: Interview with ABC News' George Stephanopoulos

Donald Trump on Technology : Dec 15, 2015
Close our Internet up, to fight ISIS terrorist recruitment

Q: You recently suggested "closing that Internet up," as a way to stop ISIS from recruiting online. Some say that would put the US in line with China and North Korea.

TRUMP: ISIS is recruiting through the Internet. ISIS is using the Internet better than we are using the Internet, and it was our idea. I want to get our brilliant people from Silicon Valley and other places and figure out a way that ISIS cannot do what they're doing. You talk freedom of speech. I don't want them using our Internet to take our young, impressionable youth. We should be using our most brilliant minds to figure a way that ISIS cannot use the Internet. And then we should be able to penetrate the Internet and find out exactly where ISIS is and everything about ISIS. And we can do that if we use our good people.

Q: So, are you open to closing parts of the Internet?

TRUMP: I would certainly be open to closing areas where we are at war with somebody. I don't want to let people that want to kill us \use our Internet.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: 2015 CNN/Salem Republican two-tier debate

Donald Trump on Homeland Security : Nov 10, 2015
We worry about Iranian nukes but why not North Korean nukes?

It's not only Russia [that we're having trouble with]. We have problems with North Korea where they actually have nuclear weapons. You know, nobody talks about it, we talk about Iran, and that's one of the worst deals ever made. One of the worst contracts ever signed, ever, in anything, and it's a disgrace. But, we have somebody over there, a madman, who already has nuclear weapons we don't talk about that.
Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Fox Business/WSJ First Tier debate

Donald Trump on Foreign Policy : Sep 28, 2015
Reimbursement for US military bases in rich countries abroad

As for nations that host US. military bases, Trump said he would charge those governments for the American presence. "I'm going to renegotiate some of our military costs because we protect South Korea. We protect Germany. We protect some of the wealthies countries in the world, Saudi Arabia. We protect everybody and we don't get reimbursement. We lose on everything, so we're going to negotiate and renegotiate trade deals, military deals, many other deals that's going to get the cost down for running our country very significantly."

Trump then got into a specific example: Saudi Arabia, one of the more important US allies in the Middle East. Saudis "make a billion dollars a day. We protect them. So we need help. We are losing a tremendous amount of money on a yearly basis and we owe $19 trillion," he said.

Walking back trade deals and agreements that allow the US military to operate overseas is easier said than done. But Trump has tapped into a powerful anti-Washington populist sentiment.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Foreign Policy Magazine on 2016 presidential hopefuls

Donald Trump on Foreign Policy : Sep 16, 2015
We must deal with the maniac in North Korea with nukes

[With regards to the Iranian nuclear deal]: Nobody ever mentions North Korea where you have this maniac sitting there and he actually has nuclear weapons and somebody better start thinking about North Korea and perhaps a couple of other places. You have somebody right now in North Korea who has got nuclear weapons and who is saying almost every other week, "I'm ready to use them." And we don't even mention it.
Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: 2015 Republican two-tiered primary debate on CNN

Bernie Sanders on Homeland Security : Sep 5, 2015
Reduce nuclear budget by $100B; end proliferation worldwide

Bernie has stated unequivocally that we must limit nuclear proliferation and work towards a safer world free of nuclear weapons: "I strongly agree with President Obama's call for 'a world without nuclear weapons.' As has been made apparent by recent provocative actions by North Korea and Iran, the threat of nuclear weapons is a present threat to the security of America and the world. We must limit nuclear proliferation, now and in the future. We must end the production of weapons-grade uranium. And we must heed what President Obama has called our 'moral responsibility' to lead the way toward reducing, and eventually eliminating, nuclear weapons."

It is with this vision in mind that Bernie supports the Iran nuclear pact. Similarly, Bernie has been working to reduce nuclear weapons stockpiles around the world. In 2015, Bernie co-sponsored the Smarter Approach to Nuclear Expenditures Act, which would reduce the nuclear weapons budget by $100 billion over the next ten years.

Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: 2016 grassroots campaign website FeelTheBern.org, "Issues"

Amy Klobuchar on War & Peace : Aug 24, 2015
2006: turn over governance of Iraq to the Iraqis

[At the Oct. 15, 2006 Senate debate , my Republican opponent Mark Kennedy and I] first discussed North Korea and then spent a lot of time talking about the war in Iraq. Kennedy called the war the "number one issue in this race" and repeated his position that although we had made some mistakes, we should stay the course. I noted that we had already spent $300 billion on the war and that while we should not suddenly pull out, we needed to turn the governing of the country over to the Iraqis and over time withdraw our troops. When I was given a chance to ask Kennedy a question, I asked him if he believed he was wrong to vote for the war in Iraq. He said he wasn't.
Click for Amy Klobuchar on other issues.   Source: 2006 MN Senate Debate in The Senator Next Door, p.213

Hillary Clinton on Foreign Policy : Jun 10, 2014
Some world leaders are still misogynistic

At Ewha Woman's University in Seoul, South Korea, I saw how reaching out to young people was going to take me into territory beyond traditional foreign policy concerns. As I stepped onto the stage at Ewha, the audience erupted in cheers. Then the young women lined up at the microphone to ask me some highly personal questions--respectfully, but eagerly.

"Is it difficult to deal with misogynistic leaders around the world?"

I responded that I would guess that many leaders choose to ignore the fact that they're dealing with a woman when they're dealing with me. But I try not to let them get away with that. (Nonetheless, it is an unfortunate reality that women in public life still face an unfair double standard. Even leaders like former Prime Minister Julia Gillard of Australia have faced outrageous sexism, which shouldn't be tolerated in any country.)

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: Hard Choices, by Hillary Clinton, p. 50

Hillary Clinton on Foreign Policy : Jun 10, 2014
Get China involved with North Korea diplomacy

Many of North Korea's 25 million people live in abject poverty. Yet the regime devotes most of its limited resources to supporting its military, developing nuclear weapons, and antagonizing its neighbors.

In my public remarks [in Feb. 2009] in Seoul I extended an invitation to the North Koreans. If they would completely and verifiably eliminate their nuclear weapons program, we would be willing to normalize relations, and assist in meeting the economic and humanitarian needs of the North Korean people. If not, the regime's isolation would continue. It was an opening gambit that was not one I thought likely to succeed. But we started off with the offer of engagement knowing it would be easier to get other nations to pressure North Korea if and when the offer was rejected. It was particularly important for China, a longtime patron and protector of the regime in Pyongyang, to be part of a united international front. [The opening failed, as have numerous others since then].

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: Hard Choices, by Hillary Clinton, p. 53-4

Hillary Clinton on Foreign Policy : Jun 10, 2014
Balance American interests between China & Korea

I decided to use my first trip as Secretary to accomplish three goals: visit our key Asian allies, Japan and South Korea; reach out to Indonesia; an emerging regional power and the home of ASEAN; and begin our crucial engagement with China.

We talked about how to balance America's interests in Asia, which sometimes seemed in competition. For example, how hard could we push the Chinese on human rights or climate change and still gain their support on security issues like Iran and North Korea Q [to Gov. O'Malley]: How many Syrian refugees should the US take in?

O'MALLEY: I was the first person on this stage to say that we should accept the 65,000 Syrian refugees that were fleeing the sort of murder of ISIL, and I believe that that needs to be done with proper screening.

Q: Secretary Clinton, how do you propose we screen those coming in to keep citizens safe?

CLINTON: I think that is the number one requirement. I also said that we should take increased numbers of refugees.

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: Link

Bernie Sanders on Principles & Values : Mar 6, 2014
My form of democratic socialism is not Communism

Q: You identify as a democratic socialist. Polling suggests that Americans are not so bothered by the term, but that our media has a really hard time with it.

A: In Vermont, people understand exactly what I mean. They don't believe that democratic socialism is akin to North Korea communism. When I talk about democratic socialism, what I'm saying is that I do not want to see the US significantly dominated by a handful of billionaire families controlling the economic & political life of the country. That I do believe that in a democratic, civilized society, all people are entitled to health care as a right, all people are entitled to quality education as a right, all people are entitled to decent jobs and a decent income, and that we need a government which represents ordinary Americans and not just the wealthy and the powerful. Very sadly, the corporate media ignores some of the huge accomplishments that have taken place in Scandinavia, with a long history of democratic socialism.

Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: The Nation 2014 interview of 2016 presidential hopefuls

Barack Obama on Free Trade : Jan 24, 2012
Double US exports via deals with Panama, Colombia, & S.Korea

Two years ago, I set a goal of doubling US exports over five years. With the bipartisan trade agreements I signed into law, we are on track to meet that goal--ahead of schedule. Soon, there will be millions of new customers for American goods in Panama, Colombia, and South Korea. Soon, there will be new cars on the streets of Seoul imported from Detroit, and Toledo, and Chicago.

I will go anywhere in the world to open new markets for American products.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2012 State of the Union speech

Julian Castro on Foreign Policy : Oct 11, 2011
Sister city builds strong bonds to South Korea

A push by Texas business leaders for increased trade with South Korea gets a boost this week when Mayor Julian Castro attends a White House state dinner Thursday for President Lee Myung-bak of the Republic of Korea. San Antonio delegates, including Castro, are in South Korea this week as part of a mission to increase trade, particularly in the environmental energy, biomedical and biotechnology industries.

The San Antonio delegation will visit Korean sister city Gwangju. "The sister city relationship between San Antonio and Gwangju underscores the important trade relationship that exists between the US and South Korea," Castro said. "It will be an honor to cap off the trip at the White House dinner with President Myung-bak," Castro said.

A White House statement said the state visit "will highlight the strong alliance, global partnership and deep economic ties between the US and the Republic of Korea."

Click for Julian Castro on other issues.   Source: Houston Chronicle, "State dinner for Korean President"

Barack Obama on Foreign Policy : Aug 30, 2011
OpEd: North Korean behavior under Bush same as under Obama

Recent history with North Korea was a pretty effective guide to how they would behave. They signed the Agreed Framework in 1994 during the Clinton administration and immediately began violating its terms, demanding payment and looking for ways to use the negotiations to blackmail the United States.

They behaved the same way with us and have brought out all their threats and demands again for the Obama administration. They have learned now, through Republican and Democratic administrations, that this is an effective way to operate. It yields concessions from the West while they continue to develop nuclear weapons. I hope a future president and secretary of state will break the cycle. This is particularly important because in the area of nonproliferation, as in so much else, the United States must lead. If we do not hold the line, few others will.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: In My Time, by V.P. Dick Cheney, p.493

Barack Obama on Education : Feb 17, 2011
To make a difference for kids, become a teacher

President Obama [said in his] State of the Nation address: "Let's also remember that after parents, the biggest impact on a child's success comes from the man or woman at the front of the classroom," said President Obama. "In South Korea, teachers are known as 'nation builders.' Here in America, it's time we treated the people who educate our children with the same level of respect."

A short time later Obama continued, "In fact, to every young person who's listening tonight contemplating their career choice: if you want to make a difference in the life of our nation; if you want to make a difference in the life of a child--become a teacher. Your country needs you."

Notice that Obama said "after parents." The President recognizes that parents and the home environment are THE most important cog in a child's education and THEN comes the teacher. That is directly opposite what Christie believes. The Governor believes that teachers are at least 50% responsible for a student's test scores.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Teachers Under Attack!, by Mike Spina, p.199

Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Jan 27, 2011
OpEd: Selectively assassinated Iranian nuclear scientists

[Obama says], "Because of diplomatic effort to insist that Iran meet its obligations, the Iranian government now faces tougher sanctions, tighter sanctions than ever before. And on the Korean Peninsula, we stand with our ally South Korea, and insist that North Korea keeps its commitment to abandon nuclear weapons."

The president, as I observed, did not mention a single word about the selective assassination of Iranian scientists by the intelligence agencies of the US and its allies, about which he was well informed.

Instead, he expanded on his remarks saying: "This is just a part of how we're sharing a world that favors peace and prosperity. With our European allies, we revitalized NATO and increased our cooperation on everything from counterterrorism to missile defense."

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Castro on 2011 State of the Union, in "Obama & Empire" p.144

Barack Obama on Free Trade : Jan 26, 2011
Double our exports by 2014; starting with South Korea

To help businesses sell more products abroad, we set a goal of doubling our exports by 2014--because the more we export, the more jobs we create here at home. Already, our exports are up. Recently, we signed agreements with India and China that will support more than 250,000 jobs here in the US. And last month, we finalized a trade agreement with South Korea that will support at least 70,000 American jobs. This agreement has unprecedented support from business and labor, Democrats and Republicans--and I ask this Congress to pass it as soon as possible.

Before I took office, I made it clear that we would enforce our trade agreements, and that I would only sign deals that keep faith with American workers and promote American jobs. That's what we did with Korea, and that's what I intend to do as we pursue agreements with Panama and Colombia and continue our Asia Pacific and global trade talks.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2011 State of the Union speech

Bernie Sanders on Budget & Economy : Dec 10, 2010
Why did we bail out South Korea?

I think the American people are interested to know that the Fed bailed out the Korea Development Bank, the wholly owned, state-owned Bank of South Korea, by purchasing over $2 billion of its commercial paper. The sole purpose of the Korea Development Bank is to finance and manage major industrial projects to enhance the national economy not of the United States of America but of South Korea. I am not against South Korea. I wish the South Koreans all the luck in the world. But it should not be the taxpayers of the United States lending their banks' money to create jobs in South Korea. I would suggest maybe we want to create jobs in the United States of America. At the same time, the Fed also extended over $40 billion for the Central Bank of South Korea so that it had enough money to bail out its own banks.
Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: The Speech: A Historic Filibuster, by Bernie Sanders

Barack Obama on Jobs : Apr 13, 2010
OpEd: GM & Chrysler takeover put union needs ahead of others

Congressman John Carter (R-TX) compares Obama's seizure of GM and Chrysler stock and bonds to President Harry Truman's nationalization of the steel mills during the Korean War, an act the Supreme Court ruled to be unconstitutional. As Carter writes, the "Truman Administration's contention--much like the Obama Administration position today--was that the aggregate powers of the Constitution and acts of Congress created new, more far-reaching powers."

Carter points out that the "Court flatly rejected this contention, writing [in "Youngstown Sheet & Tube Company v Sawyer"] that 'nowhere in the Constitution is the executive granted the right to seize power.' The Court continued, 'Congress has not granted the President the power to take possession of property, and the Constitution does not grant the President' that power"

What Obama did in the takeover was simple. He put the rights of the unsecured stakeholders--the United Auto Workers--ahead of the bondholders, whose rights were legally secured.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Take Back America, by Dick Morris, p.116

Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Mar 2, 2010
OpEd: walked away from missile defense of Eastern Europe

Russia's burgeoning relationship with Venezuela has purpose beyond energy: anything that diminishes America pleases Putin, both because it weakens a competing power and because it gratifies his personal animus for the US. Russia's resistance to severe sanctioning of North Korea and Iran as they have pursued their nuclear programs are a stick in the eye for the US. So, too, is Russia's insistence that the world replace the dollar as the reserve currency. Putin also bitterly opposes any development that would strengthen the US such as missile defense, particularly in Eastern Europe, and admission of the former Soviet satellites into NATO. Pres. Obama's decision to walk way from our missile defense program in Poland and the Czech Republic was a huge concession to Putin, as is the stalling on admission of Georgia and the Ukraine into NATO. Russia welcomes concessions, and these, like their predecessors, were not repaid in kind. Russia takes, Pres. Obama gives, and Russia demands more.
Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: No Apology, by Mitt Romney, p. 18

Barack Obama on Free Trade : Jan 29, 2010
Enforce trade being reciprocal; not just a one-way street

Rep. ROSKAM: On job creation, you mentioned Colombia, you mentioned Panama, you mentioned South Korea. Are you willing to work with us [House Republicans] to make sure those FTAs get called, that's no-cost job creation? And ultimately, as you're interacting with world leaders, that's got to put more arrows in your quiver, and that's a very powerful tool for us. But the obstacle is, frankly, the politics within the Democratic caucus?

Pres. OBAMA: You're right, there are conflicts within the Democratic Party. I suspect some Republican constituencies may be pretty suspicious about new trade agreements, because the suspicion is somehow they're all one way. Part of what we've been trying to do is to make sure that we're getting the enforcement side, that if we've got a trade agreement with China or other countries, that they are abiding with it--they're not stealing our intellectual property. And my hope is, that trade is going to be reciprocal; that it's not just going to be a one-way street.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Obama Q&A at 2010 House Republican retreat in Baltimore

Barack Obama on Foreign Policy : Jan 27, 2010
Iran is more isolated and will face growing consequences

Diplomatic efforts have strengthened our hand in dealing with those nations that insist on violating international agreements in pursuit of nuclear weapons. That's why North Korea now faces increased isolation, and stronger sanctions--sanctions that are being vigorously enforced. That's why the international community is more united, and the Islamic Republic of Iran is more isolated. And as Iran's leaders continue to ignore their obligations: They, too, will face growing consequences.
Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2010 State of the Union Address

Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Dec 10, 2009
US has helped underwrite global security for 60 years

Whatever mistakes we have made, the plain fact is this: the United States of America has helped underwrite global security for more than six decades with the blood of our citizens and the strength of our arms. The service and sacrifice of our men and women in uniform has promoted peace and prosperity from Germany to Korea, and enabled democracy to take hold in places like the Balkans. We have borne this burden not because we seek to impose our will. We have done so out of enlightened self-interest--because we seek a better future for our children and grandchildren, and we believe that their lives will be better if other peoples' children and grandchildren can live in freedom and prosperity.

So yes, the instruments of war do have a role to play in preserving the peace. And yet this truth must coexist with another--that no matter how justified, war promises human tragedy.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech in Oslo, Norway

Barack Obama on Foreign Policy : Aug 4, 2009
2007: Pledged to meet with leaders of Iran & North Korea

In a June 2007 debate in South Carolina she again drew a sharp contrast with Obama when he unexpectedly pledged that, as president, he would willingly meet with the leaders of such rogue nations as Iran and North Korea without preconditions during his first term in office. "Well, I will not promise to meet with the leasers of these countries during my first year." Clinton interjected. "I will promise a very vigorous diplomatic effort because I think it is not that you promise a meeting at that high a level before you know what the intentions are. I don't want to be used for propaganda purposes. I don't want to make a situation even worse."

This looked like another Obama gaffe. The following day, her campaign recruited former secretary of state Madeleine Albright to lead the attack against Obama. During a telephone interview, she launched a personal attack on Obama, [saying], "I thought he was irresponsible and frankly naive."

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: The Battle for America 2008, by Balz & Johnson, p. 83-84

Hillary Clinton on Foreign Policy : Aug 4, 2009
2007: Naive to meet with leaders of Iran & North Korea

In a June 2007 debate in South Carolina she again drew a sharp contrast with Obama when he unexpectedly pledged that, as president, he would willingly meet with the leaders of such rogue nations as Iran and North Korea without preconditions during his first term in office. "Well, I will not promise to meet with the leasers of these countries during my first year." Clinton interjected. "I will promise a very vigorous diplomatic effort because I think it is not that you promise a meeting at that high a level before you know what the intentions are. I don't want to be used for propaganda purposes. I don't want to make a situation even worse."

This looked like another Obama gaffe. The following day, her campaign recruited former secretary of state Madeleine Albright to lead the attack against Obama. During a telephone interview, she launched a personal attack on Obama, [saying], "I thought he was irresponsible and frankly naive."

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: The Battle for America 2008, by Balz & Johnson, p. 83-84

Barack Obama on War & Peace : Apr 8, 2009
OpEd: Overreaction to North Korean rockets

There is a report that "Obama was woken up to be informed of the launching of a North Korean rocket that apparently flew over Japan. He requested that the UN Security Council respond strongly to the provocation in an emergency meeting."

On March 12, the Peoples' Republic of Korea had announced that between April 4 and 8 it would be launching a communications satellite as part of a peaceful space program. Obama drew up a statement that said: "Rules must be binding. Violations must be punished. Words must mean something."

Launching a rocket that will facilitate communications is not a crime unless done by the Peoples' Republic of Korea that does not belong to the club of the most powerful and those who have the resources to apply such sophisticated technology. Japan took advantage of the opportunity to adjust its anti-satellite missiles and to improve its defense without anybody questioning that right. I think it was an overreaction to wake up Obama in the early morning hours.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Obama and the Empire, by Fidel Castro, p. 48

Barack Obama on Energy & Oil : Feb 24, 2009
FactCheck: Chevy Volt uses Korean battery, but Ford's don't

Obama gave a few examples of how the U.S. isn't leading when it comes to "clean, renewable energy," saying at one point that "new plug-in hybrids roll off our assembly lines, but they will run on batteries made in Korea."

He's partly right. The Chevy Volt, if it comes to market as scheduled in 2010, would be the first American-made, plug-in hybrid car, and General Motors recently announced that the Volt will use battery systems from South Korea's LG Chem Ltd.

But the U.S. isn't a complete laggard in this department. Ford said earlier this month that batteries for its hybrid, due to be available in 2012, will be supplied by a joint venture between a U.S. company, Johnson Controls Inc., and France's Saft. At least initially, though, the battery cells will be made in France; they will be assembled into power packs in the U.S.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: FactCheck.org on 2009 State of the Union address

Barack Obama on Energy & Oil : Oct 15, 2008
Let’s build a fuel-efficient car in America, not abroad

Q: Can we reduce our dependence on foreign oil and by how much in the first term, in four years?

OBAMA: We can’t drill our way out of the problem. That’s why I’ve focused on putting resources into solar, wind, biodiesel, geothermal. It is absolutely critical that we develop a high fuel efficient car that’s built not in Japan and not in South Korea, but built here in the USA. We invented the auto industry and the fact that we have fallen so far behind is something that we have to work on.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2008 third presidential debate against John McCain

Barack Obama on Free Trade : Oct 15, 2008
We export only 4,000 cars to Korea; that’s not free trade!

McCAIN: When Sen. Obama said he would unilaterally renegotiate NAFTA, the Canadians said, “Yes, and we’ll sell our oil to China.”

OBAMA: For far too long, certainly during the course of the Bush administration with the support of Sen. McCain, the attitude has been that any trade agreement is a good trade agreement. And NAFTA did not have enforceable labor agreements and environmental agreements.

And what I said was we should include those and make them enforceable. In the same way that we should enforce rules against China manipulating its currency to make our exports more expensive and their exports to us cheaper.

And when it comes to South Korea, we’ve got a trade agreement up right now, they are sending hundreds of thousands of South Korean cars into the US. That’s all good. We can only get 4,000 to 5,000 into South Korea. That is not free trade. We’ve got to have a president who is going to advocate on behalf of American businesses and American workers and I make no apology for that

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2008 third presidential debate against John McCain

Mike Gravel on War & Peace : May 2, 2008
Intent of War Powers Act was to stop wars like Iraq

The United States overthrew monarchy, but discovered that a profit-motivated democracy can develop its own forms of tyranny. Prior to the Cold War, Congress followed the Constitution. It formally declared wars. But since Truman sent troops to Korea in 1950, Congress had abdicated perhaps its most serious responsibility. Presidential abuse of power in foreign affairs became routine and Nixon seized it with abandon.

[After Vietnam] the War Powers Act became law in 1973. Congress overrode Nixon’s expected veto. The Act gave a president sixty days to use force without a declaration of war. A declaration of war by Congress was then needed. But was Congress, the press, the courts or the public really serious about reining in the destructive power of our emperor-presidents?

The Act did little to deter major wars in Iraq in 1991 and 2003, which were undertaken with resolutions, but all without a Constitutional declaration of war.

Click for Mike Gravel on other issues.   Source: A Political Odyssey, by Mike Gravel, p.185-186

Hillary Clinton on Free Trade : Nov 11, 2007
Criticized trade pacts for weak labor standards

Now courting labor and the environmentalist crowd, Hillary Clinton has come out against a trade pact with South Korea, but as senator, she has voted in support of free trade pacts with Oman, Chile and Singapore, even though she criticized them for what she said was their weak enforcement of international labor standards. In fact, she’s voted for every trade agreement that has come before her except CAFTA, the Central American version of NAFTA, the pact the public has heard the most about.
Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: The Contenders, by Laura Flanders, p. 17

Joe Biden on War & Peace : Jul 31, 2007
Bush invaded Iraq as the weakest of the Axis of Evil

The Bush neo-cons identified the biggest threats--North Korea, Iran, & Iraq. Toppling the Taliban had been a nice start for the Neo-cons, but they thought the way to handle the world’s malcontents and to avoid war was to take out one of the “axis of evil leaders in a way that made the others quake. They wanted to leverage our nation’s awesome military power in a way that sent a strong message: enable terrorists and we’ll wipe you out. You’re either with us, Bush liked to say of his ”war on terror,“ or you’re against us.

I thought this approach was flawed. The facts showed that terrorist groups didn’t base their training camps in countries with strong governments or dictators; they found safe haven in failed states & grew stronger in the vacuum of power.

There was a lot of noise about overthrowing Saddam Hussein. Of the three Axis of Evil countries, Iraq was the country that could put up the least military resistance, and I believed Cheney & Rumsfeld were pushing the president toward an invasion

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: Promises to Keep, by Joe Biden, p.330-331

Barack Obama on Foreign Policy : Jul 23, 2007
Meet with enemy leaders; it’s a disgrace that we have not

Q: Would you be willing to meet separately, without precondition, during the first year of your administration, with the leaders of Iran, Syria, Venezuela, Cuba and North Korea?

OBAMA: I would. And the reason is this: the notion that somehow not talking to countries is punishment to them--which has been the guiding diplomatic principle of this administration--is ridiculous. Ronald Reagan constantly spoke to Soviet Union at a time when he called them an evil empire. He understood that we may not trust them and they may pose an extraordinary danger to this country, but we had the obligation to find areas where we can potentially move forward. And I think that it is a disgrace that we have not spoken to them.

CLINTON: I will not promise to meet with the leaders of these countries during my first year. I don’t want to be used for propaganda purposes. I don’t want to make a situation even worse. But I certainly agree that we need to get back to diplomacy.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2007 YouTube Democratic Primary debate, Charleston SC

Hillary Clinton on Foreign Policy : Jul 23, 2007
Diplomacy yes; propaganda no; when meeting enemy leaders

Q: Would you be willing to meet separately, without precondition, during the first year of your administration, with the leaders of Iran, Syria, Venezuela, Cuba & N.Korea?

OBAMA: I would. The notion that somehow not talking to countries is punishment to them is ridiculous. I think that it is a disgrace that we have not spoken to them.

CLINTON: I will not promise to meet with the leaders of these countries during my first year. I will promise a very vigorous diplomatic effort but not a high level meeting before you know what the intentions are. I don’t want to be used for propaganda purposes. But I certainly agree that we need to get back to diplomacy, which has been turned into a bad word by this administration. I will use a lot of high-level presidential envoys to test the waters, to feel the way. But certainly, we’re not going to just have our president meet with Fidel Castro & Hugo Chavez & the president of North Korea, Iran & Syria until we know better what the way forward would be.

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: 2007 YouTube Democratic Primary debate, Charleston SC

Joe Biden on Foreign Policy : Apr 26, 2007
Biggest threat to US is from North Korea, Iran, & Russia

Q: What three nations, other than Iraq, represent, to you, the biggest threat to the United States?

A: The biggest threat to the US is, right now, North Korea. Iran not as big a threat, but a long-term threat. And quite frankly, the tendency of Putin to move in a totalitarian direction, which would unhinge all that’s going on positively in Europe.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: 2007 South Carolina Democratic primary debate, on MSNBC

Amy Klobuchar on Foreign Policy : Oct 15, 2006
When North Korea crosses line, there have to be consequences

Q: Do we use military action to stop North Korea’s nuclear program?

KLOBUCHAR: As a prosecutor, I know that when people cross a line, there’s got to be consequences. And in foreign affairs, it’s the same thing. I believe these sanctions are incredibly important; we can’t have North Korea begin to be some kind of weapons factory.

Q: If the North Koreans ignore the sanctions, what do we do?

KLOBUCHAR: We have to keep ratcheting things up. We have to keep working with our partners. But one of the things that went wrong here is that these multilateral discussions broke down, North Korea walked away from the table, and I believe we have to keep talking. It’s good that China’s part of this, but if it’s moving in the right direction and if we believe it’s in our national security interests, we should be talking to them directly. I mean, even during the Cold War we kept talking to Russia. And so the discussions are important, and we need to keep the diplomatic pressure on.

Click for Amy Klobuchar on other issues.   Source: 2006 MN Senate debate, on Meet the Press

Mike Gravel on Foreign Policy : Aug 15, 2006
Bi-lateral plus multi-lateral talks with North Korea

My position on North Korea is unambiguous: I would initiate bi-lateral talks between the US and North Korea that complement the multi-lateral talks. I would make it clear to the North Korean government that proceeding with a nuclear program is not in its long term best interests while keeping other minor regional players abreast of negotiations. Artful and aggressive diplomacy can be even more lethal but less dangerous than the use of military force and thus will be the cornerstone of my foreign policy.
Click for Mike Gravel on other issues.   Source: The Gravel Report, vol. 1, no. 1, “The High Road”

Barack Obama on War & Peace : Jul 12, 2004
Engage North Korea in 6-party talks

[We should] address the threat posed by North Korea. By refusing to negotiate with North Korea for three and half years, experts believe that North Korea may now be close to having six to eight nuclear weapons. We must immediately insist on complete and verifiable elimination of North Korea’s nuclear capability, engage in Six-Party bilateral talks, and facilitate a reform agenda that is broader than denuclearization to address humanitarian concerns.
Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Press Release, “Renewal of American Leadership ”

Donald Trump on War & Peace : Jul 2, 2000
Use force to stop North Korean nuke development

[In a Trump presidency], North Korea would suddenly discover that its worthless promises of civilized behavior would cut no ice. I would let Pyongyang know in no uncertain terms that it can either get out of the nuclear arms race or expect a rebuke similar to the one Ronald Reagan delivered to Ghadhafi in 1986. I don’t think anybody is going to accuse me of tiptoeing through the issues or tap-dancing around them either. Who else in public life has called for a pre-emptive strike on North Korea?
Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: The America We Deserve, by Donald Trump, p.274

Barack Obama on Government Reform : Aug 1, 1996
Campaign race baiting works in both directions

Black politicians discovered what white politicians had known for a very long time: that race-baiting could make up for a host of limitations. Younger leaders, eager to make a name for themselves, upped the ante, peddling conspiracy theories all over tow -the Koreans were funding the Klan, Jewish doctors were injecting black babies with AIDS. It was a shortcut to fame, if not always fortune; like sex or violence on TV, black rage always found a ready market. Nobody I spoke with in the neighborhood seemed to take such talk very seriously. As it was, many had already given up the hope that politics could actually improve their lives, much less make demands on them. To them, a ballot, if cast at all, was simply a ticket to a good show. Black had no real power to act on the occasional slips into anti-Semitism or Asian-bashing, people would tell me; and anyway, black folks needed a chance to let off a little steam every once in a while-what do you think those folks say about us behind our backs?
Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Dreams from My Father, by Barack Obama, p.186

Joe Biden on War & Peace : Oct 2, 1975
With US troops in Korea, we are too committed to war

Q: Do you foresee any serious future involvements with regard to our troops in Korea?

BIDEN: Sure, I can see that happening. We have troops stationed in Korea. Now, if the U.S. is sitting there with its hands in its pockets, troops and military equipment there, and the madman in the north decides to reinstitute open hostilities and invades across the border--we are in a war. There's no time to sit and think about whether or not we want to get involved. We have 42,000 troops there, and you know how the public side of foreign policy works: TV shows American troops 1under siege, and right away the question becomes, "What do we need to do to protect the American boys there?" But what I'm getting at is that, in this situation, we have

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: People Paper (Newark DE) interview in Congressional Record

Mike Gravel on Foreign Policy : Jan 1, 1972
US should empower UN with stand-by peace force

The US has systematically undercut the power of the UN and used it for our own purposes. We use our influence to secure a UN cover for our intervention in Korea. We deliberately ignored efforts by the UN to produce a peaceful settlement in Vietnam.

The US, as the most powerful country, must now lead the way in building up the power and capacity of the UN to act effectively in areas of conflict.

In the long-run, I believe the UN must develop into the primary peace-keeping force on earth, and we should take the lead in this development.

A more powerful UN must grow slowly, applying its influence initially in regions where the conflicts of interest are limited and where the parties involved want to avoid war and seek peace. Beyond this, it can apply sanctions in cases of colonial oppression to permit independence movements to achieve legitimate ends. And it can maintain a permanent stand-by peace force, to serve as a presence whenever armed conflict threatens.

Click for Mike Gravel on other issues.   Source: Citizen Power, by Sen. Mike Gravel, p. 58-59

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