issues2000

Topics in the News: Vouchers


Ben Carson on Education : Apr 15, 2013
School choice increases competitive nature of education

School choice obviously plays a huge role [in making the education system more competitive]. I think having charter schools, having school vouchers, things of that nature are extremely good because unless you are competing for those students, it's very likely you're going to become complacent. Schools, and teachers, educators are no different than anybody else. People tend to respond to stimulation, and when there's no stimulation, they tend to kind of relax. So we need to put the appropriate stimulation there to increase the competitive nature of education.
Click for Ben Carson on other issues.   Source: NewsMaxTV: Carson on school choice

Ben Carson on Education : Apr 15, 2013
School choice increases competitive nature of education

I think having charter schools, having school vouchers, things of that nature are extremely good because unless you are competing for those students, it's very likely you're going to become complacent. So we need to put the appropriate stimulation there to increase the competitive nature of education. Q
Click for Ben Carson on other issues.   Source: Transcribed from NewsmaxTV on YouTube

Jeb Bush on Education : Nov 30, 2012
Florida Formula: schools graded A-to-F; extra funding for A

Bush's "Florida formula" rests on the principles of increasing accountability and expanding parental choice. Among its tenets:
Click for Jeb Bush on other issues.   Source: Stephanie Simon on Reuters, "Bush Foundation"

Paul Ryan on Health Care : Oct 11, 2012
Nobody is proposing vouchers; it's a check in the mailbox

Q: What is your specific plan for seniors who really can't afford to make up the difference in the value of what you call a premium support plan and others call a voucher?

RYAN: A hundred percent coverage for them.

Q: How do you pay for it?

RYAN: The premium support payments? By taking down the subsidies for wealthy people.

BIDEN: We will not be part of any voucher [that says] when you're 65, go out there, shop for the best insurance you can get; you're out of Medicare. You can buy back in, if you want, with this voucher, which will not keep pace with health care costs, because if it did keep pace with health care costs, there would be no savings. We will be no part of a voucher program or the privatization of Social Security.

RYAN: A voucher is you go to your mailbox, get a check and buy something. Nobody's proposing that.

Click for Paul Ryan on other issues.   Source: 2012 Vice Presidential debate

Mitt Romney on Health Care : Oct 3, 2012
No change to near-retirees; Medicare vouchers for young

Q: You don't support Medicare vouchers?

OBAMA: I don't.

ROMNEY: Again, that's for future people, not for current retirees.

OBAMA: In fairness, what Gov. Romney has now said is he'll maintain traditional Medicare alongside it. But those insurance companies are pretty clever at figuring out who are the younger and healthier seniors. They recruit them, leaving the older, sicker seniors in Medicare. And the traditional Medicare system will collapse.

ROMNEY: What I support is no change for current retirees and near-retirees to Medicare. And the president supports taking $716 billion out of that program.

Q: And what about the vouchers?

ROMNEY: For people coming along that are young, what I do to make sure that we can keep Medicare in place for them is to allow them either to choose the current Medicare program or a private plan. Their choice.

Click for Mitt Romney on other issues.   Source: First Obama-Romney 2012 Presidential debate

Mitt Romney on Health Care : Oct 3, 2012
Give young people a choice of Medicare or private insurer

OBAMA: Vouchers wouldn't necessarily keep up with health care inflation; it would cost the average senior about $6,000 a year.

ROMNEY: For people coming along that are young, allow them either to choose the current Medicare program or a private plan. Their choice. They get to choose--and they'll have at least two plans that will be entirely at no cost to them. So they don't have to pay additional money, no additional $6,000. That's not going to happen. And if the government can be as efficient as the private sector and offer premiums that are as low, people will be happy to get traditional Medicare or they'll be able to get a private plan. I know my own view is I'd rather have a private plan. I'd just as soon not have the government telling me what kind of health care I get. I'd rather be able to have an insurance company. If I don't like them, I can get rid of them.

OBAMA: Medicare has lower administrative costs than private insurance; private insurers have to make a profit.

Click for Mitt Romney on other issues.   Source: First Obama-Romney 2012 Presidential debate

Barack Obama on Health Care : Oct 3, 2012
I don't think Medicare vouchers are the way to go

ROMNEY: With regards to young people coming along, I've got proposals to make sure Medicare and Social Security are there for them without any question.

OBAMA: I think it's important for Governor Romney to present this plan that he says will only affect folks in the future. And the essence of the plan is that you would turn Medicare into a voucher program. It's called premium support, but it's understood to be a voucher program.

Q: And you don't support that?

OBAMA: I don't. And let me explain why.

ROMNEY: Again, that's for future people, not for current retirees.

OBAMA: The idea, which was originally presented by Congressman Ryan, your running mate, is that we would give a voucher to seniors and they could go out in the private marketplace and buy their own health insurance. The problem is that because the voucher wouldn't necessarily keep up with health care inflation, it was estimated that this would cost the average senior about $6,000 a year.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: First Obama-Romney 2012 Presidential debate

Gary Johnson on Education : Aug 1, 2012
Vouchers OK for church childcare & church schools

I've got news for anybody who criticizes vouchers as being unconstitutional or says that government can't be spending money on religious institutions. In essence, we have a voucher system for child care. For those mothers who are on welfare, we give them what in essence is a voucher which allows them to choose where to send their children to child care, and in many cases that child care is religious. That's a state-funded program. We don't call it a "voucher" but we might as well.
Click for Gary Johnson on other issues.   Source: Seven Principles, by Gary Johnson, p. 96-97

Gary Johnson on Education : Aug 1, 2012
$3,500 voucher for every K-12 student

I proposed that every K-12 student in the state of NM, all 300,000 of them, get a $3,500 voucher to attend whatever school the family wanted.

I realized that many people believed vouchers take money away from the public school system. But my plan would have increased the per capita funding for kids who remained in public schools because we were actually spending about $5,500/child--so each public school district would get an extra $2,000 for each student who opted out.

I used this example to explain: If every student in Santa Fe were to opt out of public schools, which would never happen, Santa Fe public schools would be left with about 40% of their budget and no students. Tell me how that takes away from public education.

I believe that we should treat K-12 education more like higher education. The reason higher education in the US is the best in the world is because these institutions compete with each other for tuition dollars. We need that same competition in public education.

Click for Gary Johnson on other issues.   Source: Seven Principles, by Gary Johnson, p. 68-69

Gary Johnson on Education : Aug 1, 2012
Vouchers are as constitutional as pre-school and day-care

The argument that vouchers favor the rich is absurd. People with money live in good neighborhoods that have good schools. Vouchers are for the poor, for those that don't have money, who live in the worst neighborhoods, go to the worst schools, and can't get away from them.

The argument that vouchers are unconstitutional because you're giving money to private schools is bogus. If you want to start calling vouchers unconstitutional, then every single state has got a lot of unconstitutional programs. We give low-income parents money so they can take their pre-school children to day-care centers of their choice. Many are church-affiliated. We don't tell them where they have to take their child.

This is not about getting rid of or weakening public education, it's about providing alternatives that will force public schools to react very quickly. Public schools will get better if they have to compete.

Click for Gary Johnson on other issues.   Source: Seven Principles, by Gary Johnson, p. 69

Gary Johnson on Education : Aug 1, 2012
Competition would make our schools better

A poll came back on the issue of school vouchers that said we shouldn't use the term "voucher," that we should use "choice" or "opportunity scholarship" instead. But we were talking about vouchers!.

I didn't want to try to circumvent or dilute the issue. Instead, we took it to every part of the state, to the teachers' convention, to the parents, and made our case that, with so much money pouring into our schools, we had little to show for it. Competition would make our schools better.

When I sought re-election, my opponent thought the school voucher issue would be the death of me. I wasn't.

Business is about "Best product, best service, lowest price." If you can combine all three of those elements, then you're successful. Period.

I see vouchers as a way of bringing those three business elements into education: Best product, best service, lowest price.

Click for Gary Johnson on other issues.   Source: Seven Principles, by Gary Johnson, p. 93-95

Barack Obama on Budget & Economy : Jan 8, 2012
Obama economic stances compared to Romney

Do Obama and Romney disagree on school vouchers? (Yes). Do they both like "No Child Left Behind"? (No). We cite details from Romney's books and speeches, and Obama's, so you can compare them, side-by-side, on issues like these:

Romney vs. Obama on Economic Issues

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Paperback: Romney vs. Obama On The Issues

Newt Gingrich on Education : Jan 1, 2012
Gingrich's education stances compared to Ron Paul's

Do Gingrich and Paul agree on school vouchers? (No; Paul opposes them). Do they agree on college loans? (Yes, both oppose them, but for different reasons). We cite details from Paul's books and speeches, and Gingrich's, so you can compare them, side-by-side, on issues like these:

Gingrich vs. Paul on Social Issues

Click for Newt Gingrich on other issues.   Source: Paperback: Gingrich vs. Paul On The Issues

Jon Huntsman on Education : Aug 11, 2011
No Child Left Behind has failed; we need vouchers

Q: [to Huntsman]: This week, the Obama administration announced that they would grant waivers to some failing public school systems that couldn't meet the standard of the No Child Left Behind program. If you were president, would you return to full enforcement of this Bush-era law?

HUNTSMAN: No Child Left Behind hasn't worked for this country. It ought to be done away with. We need to take education to the local level, where parents and local elected officials can determine the destiny of these schools. Nobody wants their schools to succeed more than local elected officials and their parents. We need choice. We need vouchers. We need more technology in the classroom.

Q: [to Cain]: Would you return to the full enforcement of NCLB?

CAIN: No. I believe in education starting at the local. No Child Left Behind had some faults. I don't believe in unfunded mandates. I believe that the federal government should be out of the business of trying to micromanage the education of our children.

Click for Jon Huntsman on other issues.   Source: Iowa Straw Poll 2011 GOP debate in Ames Iowa

Gary Johnson on Education : Jul 21, 2011
Give every student in New Mexico vouchers worth $3,500

Governor Johnson proposed giving every student in the entire state of New Mexico vouchers worth $3,500. He once compared the program to child-care vouchers, saying "For those mothers who are on welfare, we give them what in essence is a voucher which allows them to choose where to send their children to child care, and in many cases that child care is religious. That's a state-funded program. We don't call it a voucher but it might just as well be called a voucher." He wants universal school choice.
Click for Gary Johnson on other issues.   Source: Club for Growth 2012 Presidential White Paper #9: Johnson

Bobby Jindal on Education : Nov 15, 2010
I favor whatever works, including vouchers & charters

While liberals hysterically claim school choice would destroy public education, their real concern is their fear of the teacher unions, which lose power to parents through school choice. Liberals also reflexively opposed any policy that might benefit religious schools.

Schools choice takes many forms--vouchers, tax credits, charters, student scholarships, and transfers to better public schools are a few. I favor whatever works, depending on the needs of the community. The successful methods we're using in New Orleans--charter schools and scholarship programs--could serve as a model for other cities looking to secure a good education for their poorest, most vulnerable kids. I'm for what works.

Communities with failing education systems nationwide need to act fast to expand school choice. Telling parents to wait to the failing school in their neighborhood to improve on its own is offensive and absurd.

Click for Bobby Jindal on other issues.   Source: Leadership and Crisis, by Bobby Jindal, p. 76-77

Paul Ryan on Health Care : Jan 29, 2010
Medicare is a $38 trillion unfunded liability--add vouchers

Pres. OBAMA: The major driver of our long-term liabilities, is Medicare and Medicaid and our health care spending. That's going to be what our children have to worry about. Now, [Rep. Paul Ryan's] approach--if I understand it correctly, would say we're going to provide vouchers of some sort for current Medicare recipients at the current level.

Rep. RYAN: No.

Pres. OBAMA: No?

Rep. RYAN: People 55 and above are grandfathered in.

Pres. OBAMA: But just for future beneficiaries, the basic idea would be that at some point we hold Medicare cost per recipient constant as a way of making sure that that doesn't go way out of whack, right?

Rep. RYAN: We drew it as a blend of inflation and health inflation. Medicare is a $38 trillion unfunded liability-- it has to be reformed for younger generations because it's going bankrupt. And the premise of our idea is, why not give people the same kind of health care plan we here have in Congress?

Click for Paul Ryan on other issues.   Source: Obama Q&A at 2010 House Republican retreat in Baltimore

Barack Obama on Health Care : Jan 29, 2010
Medicare is major driver of our long-term liabilities

Pres. OBAMA: The major driver of our long-term liabilities, is Medicare and Medicaid and our health care spending. That's going to be what our children have to worry about. Now, [Rep. Paul Ryan's] approach--if I understand it correctly, would say we're going to provide vouchers of some sort for current Medicare recipients at the current level.

Rep. RYAN: No.

Pres. OBAMA: No?

Rep. RYAN: People 55 and above are grandfathered in.

Pres. OBAMA: But just for future beneficiaries, the basic idea would be that at some point we hold Medicare cost per recipient constant as a way of making sure that that doesn't go way out of whack, right?

Rep. RYAN: We drew it as a blend of inflation and health inflation. Medicare is a $38 trillion unfunded liability-- it has to be reformed for younger generations because it's going bankrupt. And the premise of our idea is, why not give people the same kind of health care plan we here have in Congress?

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Obama Q&A at 2010 House Republican retreat in Baltimore

Jeb Bush on Health Care : Dec 11, 2009
Provide risk-adjusted premiums (insurance vouchers)

Announced in his State of the State Address, the governor's reform was to provide each person in the program with a risk-adjusted allotment of funds (a voucher which the state called a premium) with which to purchase health care. Using this voucher, enrollees were required to purchase a health-care plan from a participating managed-care organization. The benefit package offered had to be actuarially equivalent to the existing Medicaid benefit.

To entice companies to insure some of Florida's sickest and poorest citizens, the state proposed to cap Medicaid benefits, and set a ceiling on spending for each recipient. Managed-care companies and other health-care networks would design alternative health plans that Medicaid patients would use. Beyond that, different managed-care networks could attract patients by offering additional services. However, patients would have a choice only among managed-care plans and no longer have access to traditional fee-for-service health care.

Click for Jeb Bush on other issues.   Source: Aggressive Conservatism in Florida, by Robert Crew, p. 38

Barack Obama on Education : Oct 15, 2008
I doubled charter schools in Illinois; but no vouchers

McCAIN: Choice and competition amongst schools is one of the key elements that’s already been proven in places in like New Orleans and New York City and other places, where we have charter schools. We have to be able to give parents the same choice, frankly, that Sen. Obama and Mrs. Obama had and Cindy and I had to send our kids & their kids to the school of their choice.

Charter schools aren’t the only answer, but they’re providing competition. They are providing the kind of competitions that have upgraded both types of schools.

OBAMA: Sen. McCain and I actually agree on charter schools. I doubled the number of charter schools in Illinois despite some reservations from teachers unions. I think it’s important to foster competition inside the public schools. Where we disagree is on the idea that we can somehow give out vouchers as a way of securing the problems in our education system.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2008 third presidential debate against John McCain

Barack Obama on Education : Oct 15, 2008
Vouchers don’t solve the problems of our schools

McCAIN: I’m sure you’re aware, Sen. Obama, of the program in the Washington, D.C., school system where vouchers are provided. It’s a thousand and some 9,000 parents asked to be eligible for that.

OBAMA: The D.C. school system is in terrible shape, and it has been for a very long time. And we’ve got a wonderful new superintendent there who’s working very hard with the young mayor.

McCAIN: Who supports vouchers.

OBAMA: Actually, she supports charters.

McCAIN: She supports vouchers, also.

OBAMA: Even if Sen. McCain were to say that vouchers were the way to go--I disagree with him on this, because the data doesn’t show that it actually solves the problem--the centerpiece of Sen. McCain’s education policy is to increase the voucher program in D.C. by 2,000 slots. That leaves all of you who live in the other 50 states without an education reform policy from Sen. McCain.

McCAIN: Because there’s not enough vouchers; therefore, we shouldn’t do it, even though it’s working. I got it.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2008 third presidential debate against John McCain

Barack Obama on Education : Oct 15, 2008
FactCheck: McCain for national reforms & also DC vouchers

The Statement:Obama criticized McCain’s education proposals, saying, “The centerpiece of Senator McCain’s education policy is to increase the voucher program in D.C. by 2,000 slots,” Obama said. “That leaves all of you who live in the other 50 states without an education reform policy from Senator McCain.”

The Facts:McCain does support expanding what’s called The D.C. Opportunity Scholarship Program. But McCain’s other proposals for education, as detailed on his campaign Web site, include expanding funding for at least one Head Start center in each state; requiring all federally supported preschools to offer comprehensive teaching in subjects including literacy, math readiness and social skills; and funding to provide bonuses to teachers who move to underperforming schools.

The Verdict:False. While education has been less prominent than other issues, McCain has several education proposals other than school vouchers.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: CNN FactCheck on 2008 third presidential debate

Barack Obama on Education : Jul 12, 2008
Fight for social & economic justice begins in the classroom

We’ll make sure that every child in this country gets a world-class education from the day they’re born until the day they graduate from college. What McCain is offering amounts to little more than the same tired rhetoric about vouchers. We need to move beyond the same debate we’ve been having for the past 30 years when we haven’t gotten anything done. We need to fix & improve our public schools, not throw our hands up and walk away from them. We need to uphold the ideal of public education, but we also need reform. That’s why I’ve introduced a comprehensive strategy to recruit an army of new quality teachers to our communities--and to pay them more & give them more support. We’ll invest in early childhood education programs so that our kids don’t begin the race of life behind the starting line and offer a $4,000 tax credit to make college affordable for anyone who wants to go. Because as the NAACP knows better than anyone, the fight for social justice and economic justice begins in the classroom.
Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: McCain-Obama speeches at 99th NAACP Convention

Jeb Bush on Abortion : Feb 15, 2007
Created divisive "Choose Life" license plates

Jeb injected religion into state government at seemingly every opportunity. He insisted that religious schools be allowed to take state money in the form of tuition vouchers, even though the Florida constitution prohibited the practice. He signed into law a divisive "Choose Life" Florida license plate that helps antiabortion groups raise money. He used state money to set up so-called "faith-based" prisons. He pushed through money to let his office fund antiabortion billboards along state highways.
Click for Jeb Bush on other issues.   Source: America's Next Bush, by S.V. Date, p.294-295

Jeb Bush on Education : Feb 15, 2007
Make school plan more punitive and more vouchers

As Lt. Governor, Jeb ultimately went with Frank Brogan, the sitting education commissioner. Brogan helped immensely both during the 1998 campaign as well as the 1st term by softening Jeb's hard edge. In the end, he predictably had little influence on Jeb's policies. Jeb is such a domineering personality, it was hard to imagine otherwise. Jeb's much-vaunted "A-plus" education plan is a perfect example. Brogan, a former teacher, a former school administrator, a former education commissioner, had drawn up the 1st draft. Jeb rejected it out of hand because it wasn't punitive enough and didn't generate a sufficient number of school vouchers quickly enough.
Click for Jeb Bush on other issues.   Source: America's Next Bush, by S.V. Date, p.111

Sarah Palin on Education : Oct 22, 2006
Support charters & home schools; not private school vouchers

Q: Would you support amending the state constitution to allow private school vouchers?

A: My priorities are to support options for education as allowable within the current funding formula--including home schools, charter schools and vocational training. This doesn’t require amending the constitution.

Click for Sarah Palin on other issues.   Source: Anchorage Daily News: 2006 gubernatorial candidate profile

Hillary Clinton on Education : Oct 11, 2006
Supports public school choice; but not private nor parochial

In 2006, Hillary disparaged vouchers partly on the worry that vouchers enabling parents to send their children to parochial schools could be used to train children to become terrorists. A Cato Institute Education specialist pointed out that “under federal law no one would be permitted to open a school that advocates violence against the country.” Thus vouchers could not go to a “School of Jihad.”

Years earlier, Hillary tried to play centrist on the school choice debate. In It Takes a Village she said she supported “choice among public schools” but redefined “school choice.” Instead of helping provide choice between public and private schools, she uses choice to mean choice among public schools. She wrote “some critics of public schools urge greater competition among schools as a way of returning control from bureaucrats and politicians to parents and teachers. I find their arguments persuasive, and that’s why I strongly favor promoting choice among public schools.”

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy, by Amanda Carpenter, p. 89-90

Barack Obama on Education : Oct 1, 2006
More teacher pay in exchange for more teacher accountability

Conservatives argue that the problems in schools are caused by bureaucracies and teachers’ unions; and that the only solution is to hand out vouchers. Those on the left find themselves defending an indefensible status quo, insisting that more spending will improve education.

Both assumptions are wrong. Money does matter in education. But there is no denying that the way many public schools are managed poses at least as big a problem as how well they’re funded.

Our task is to identify those reforms that have the highest impact on achievement, fund them, and eliminate those programs that don’t produce results. We are going to have to take the teaching profession seriously. This means paying teachers what they are worth. There is no reason why an experienced, highly qualified teacher shouldn’t earn $100,000. In exchange for more money, teachers need to become more accountable for their performances, and school districts need to have greater ability to get rid of ineffective teachers.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: The Audacity of Hope, by Barack Obama, p.161-163

Andrew Cuomo on Education : Oct 14, 2003
Vouchers undermine existing public schools

Republicans stress lack of accountability while Democrats claim inadequate resources. Democrats must stick to their principles of supporting our public schools, but they also must not be afraid to embrace new solutions and increased accountability to improve them.

Vouchers for private school are not the panacea that the Republicans would have people believe, and they threaten to undermine our existing public schools. Charter schools hold selective promise, but are only a part of the answer. We must embrace comprehensive reform of our public school system that does not continually seek, as the Republicans often do, simply to remove children from, or undermine, those systems.

We must be willing to close persistently failing schools that have not responded to help, in favor of new schools with new staff and new approaches. Democrats are the party of public education and therefore we must be the party that demands the most from public education.

Click for Andrew Cuomo on other issues.   Source: Crossroads, by Andrew Cuomo, p. 72

Rick Perry on Education : Jun 28, 2002
Start a pilot voucher program in Texas

The Supreme Court’s ruling that government-funded vouchers can be used for tuition at religious schools may settle the question of constitutionality, but the fight will shift to state courts, in legal battles over state constitutional objections to voucher programs, and to state legislatures and the ballot box.

Texas is among several states expected to seriously consider creating a voucher program. Rick Perry, who said he supports the court’s decision, said a voucher program could be developed next year in the Legislature, where similar bills have stalled before. “What it says is that parents have a place and role in the decision-making process about where their children go to school,” he said. “It’s about parental choice.” Perry said he favors starting with a pilot program.

Click for Rick Perry on other issues.   Source: Dallas Morning News

Mitt Romney on Education : Mar 21, 2002
Supported means-tested vouchers for public & private schools

Click for Mitt Romney on other issues.   Source: Boston Globe review of 1994 canpaign issues

Hillary Clinton on Education : Oct 28, 2000
More teachers, smaller classes, no vouchers

I’ve been involved with schools now for 17 years, working on behalf of education reform. And I think we know what works. We know that getting classroom size down works. That’s why I’m for adding 100,000 teachers to the classroom. We know that modernizing and better equipping our schools works. And we know that high standards works. But what’s important is to stay committed to the public school system, not siphon off money, as my opponent would, with vouchers.
Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: NY Senate debate on NBC

Hillary Clinton on Education : Oct 8, 2000
Vouchers would take money from public schools

Q: Why don’t you support vouchers for low-income parents?

CLINTON: I could not support vouchers that would take money away from schools where teachers are in partitioned hallways, where the teacher has the only textbook in the classroom. If we can get class size down, if we can provide qualified teachers, we can make a difference. I support adding 100,000 teachers to lower class size. I support the bipartisan school construction funding authority that would permit New York to have school construction without raising taxes.

LAZIO: I have voted twice to support hiring additional teachers. Under my plan, New York would not get shortchanged. Under Mrs. Clinton’s plan, New Yorkers would be subsidizing Southern states. I think it’s immoral to force a child to go to a school where they can’t learn. Poor parents want to have the choice to give their children the education that I want for my children. I trust parents to make that decision, and that’s a major philosophical difference.

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: Senate debate in Manhattan

Brian Schweitzer on Education : Sep 27, 2000
Opposes parents choosing schools via vouchers

Brian does not support school vouchers. Brian wants Montana’s schools to be more than best in the country, we need to be best in the world. We need to create a logical, sequential system to evaluate new educational systems, not just throw more money at a problem.
Click for Brian Schweitzer on other issues.   Source: www.brianschweitzer.com

Hillary Clinton on Education : Sep 13, 2000
Vouchers drain money from public schools

Q: Do you support vouchers for private schools?

CLINTON: I’ve visited schools throughout the state and some of them are among the finest in the world that you could find anywhere. But others are overcrowded, under-resourced. That’s why I put forth a plan to try to get the teachers that we need and to provide the funds that are required for modernizing our schools, as well as setting high standards, making them safe from violence. I do not support vouchers. And the reason I don’t is because I don’t think we can afford to siphon dollars away from our underfunded public schools.

LAZIO: I believe that it’s immoral to ask a child to go to a school where they can’t learn or where they’re not safe. 80 percent of African-American and Hispanic parents feel that they need it. Why should we trap poor kids in failing schools simply because the teachers unions won’t agree with it?

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: Clinton-Lazio debate, Buffalo NY

Jesse Ventura on Education : Jul 10, 2000
Public dollars belong to public schools

We eliminated the word “vouchers” from our vocabulary. Public dollars belong to public schools. We’ve fought to uphold a controversial set of high standards that redefines what it means to be educated. We insisted that students need to pass high stakes standards in order to prove they have learned something.
Click for Jesse Ventura on other issues.   Source: Speech to Education Commission of the States

Hillary Clinton on Education : Jul 5, 1999
Vouchers will not improve our public schools

I know there are some who believe that vouchers are the way to improve our public schools; I believe they are dead wrong. There is simply no evidence that vouchers improve student achievement. We’ve been experimenting with vouchers in some jurisdictions for a couple of years-we’ve found no evidence that these have made any difference in student achievement. But what they have done is to divert much-needed public funds for the few and have weakened the entire system.
Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: Remarks to NEA in Orlando, Florida

Rick Perry on Education : May 28, 1999
Supports vouchers, but didn't push proposal through

On March 29 Perry forced a vote on an ill-fated school voucher proposal. It’s perhaps the issue with which Perry’s campaign was most closely associated, and the one he was expected to push for the hardest. Perry’s campaign was famously funded by a $1 million loan guaranteed by Jim Leininger, the conservative millionaire who champions school vouchers and tort reform.

Perry watchers have varying explanations for the fate of school vouchers this session -- and for Perry’s failure to fight harder or more publicly on their behalf: The first theory holds that he’s not really a true believer in vouchers. The second explanation is that he is a true believer in the voucher issue?among others?but that he’s laying low until assumption of the governorship allows him to reveal his true colors. Yet a third explanation is that Perry is simply learning the ropes and building relationships with legislators before making a serious run at an issue that has proved controversial among voters and politicos alike.

Click for Rick Perry on other issues.   Source: Jenny Staff, The Austin Chronicle, vol. 18. no. 39

Jesse Ventura on Education : Nov 1, 1998
Public schools are inefficient; but fix them, don’t end them

I am a proud product of the Minnesota public school system. Instead of giving families vouchers, tax credits or deductions to help their children get into private schools, I believe we should be supporting our public school systems. A recent survey showed that 72% of the respondents preferred improving public schools to vouchers. 21% wanted vouchers and 7% were unsure. When a good system becomes inefficient or ineffective, the best solution is not necessarily to just get rid of the system. The best solution is to identify the problem areas and promptly implement solutions to fix them. Instead of bashing our public school system, we should be identifying what works and why it works. We should then be copying or adapting that solution in the problem areas. If the parents, businesses and communities all work together to support our teachers and schools, we can conquer the problems.
Click for Jesse Ventura on other issues.   Source: 1998 campaign web site, jesseVentura.org/98campaign

Hillary Clinton on Education : Aug 4, 1998
Vouchers siphon off much-needed resources

Charter schools are a way of bringing teachers and parents and communities together-instead of other efforts-like vouchers-which separate people out-siphon much needed resources; and weakening the school systems that desperately need to be strengthened.
Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: Remarks at Charter School Meeting, Washington DC

Jeb Bush on Education : Jul 2, 1998
Supports charter schools & vouchers

Click for Jeb Bush on other issues.   Source: 1998 Florida National Political Awareness Test

Jesse Ventura on Education : Feb 10, 1998
Choosing private school includes responsility to pay

Q: Do you favor charter schools, vouchers and private sector involvement in schools?

A: I grew up in South Minneapolis and am a product of the public school system. I believe in supporting the public schools. If individuals don’t want to go to the public schools, they have the choice to go to private schools. But it is their responsibility to pay for that option, not taxpayers.

I place much of the blame that falls on the public schools today on the parents. If your kid is 12 or 13 years old and doesn’t know how to read, where have the parents been? Why didn’t they figure out that their kid can’t read when the kid was in first or second grade? Why weren’t they in the schools doing something about it then, instead of blaming the schools now?

As Governor, I will say no to vouchers and no to public tax support for private schools. I will work to strengthen the public schools. And I will work to get parents more involved in the education of their kids.

Click for Jesse Ventura on other issues.   Source: E-Democracy Debate

Newt Gingrich on Education : Jul 2, 1996
Adopt vouchers to break unionized monopoly of inner city

The greatest single misallocation of taxpayers' money has been the unionized monopolies of inner-city education. It is astonishing how much is spent per child on these cumbersome, red-tape-ridden bureaucracies--and how little ever gets to the individual child.

The Wisconsin legislature adopted a voucher system that allows inner-city children to attend private schools at state expense. The Wisconsin teachers' union and the traditional liberals fought bitterly, but Republicans led a broad bipartisan coalition that seeks to break the public-school monopoly and find new ways to educate poor children.

From home schooling to vouchers, from a drastic overhaul of the present system to allowing private companies to take over whole school distracts-- we simply have to take whatever steps are necessary to ensure that poor children can participate in the Information Age. There is no other strategy that will give them a full opportunity to pursue happiness.

Click for Newt Gingrich on other issues.   Source: Renew America, by Newt Gingrich, p. 82-83

Newt Gingrich on Education : Jun 1, 1995
Voucherize inner-city programs from schools to groceries

In a speech in March, 1995, to business leaders in suburban Atlanta, Gingrich noted that the public school system in the District of Columbia spends $9,600 a year per pupil, nearly double the national average. He suggested that for such a high level of spending, each could have private tutors and personal transportation to school--plus lunch. He advocates vouchers to parents so they can choose the schools, public or private, their children will attend.

"I think we ought to voucherize every program in the inner city with cash payments to parents allowing them to decide where and what to purchase, be it an elementary school, health care, or groceries." Some in his audience thought he was exaggerating to make a point. In a later interview, he was willing to go even further. "Suppose you need to get children away from failed teachers. What if we called on the home-schoolers in Maryland and Virginia to come to D.C. for a massive home schooling program, teaching parents how to teach their children."

Click for Newt Gingrich on other issues.   Source: Newt!, by Dick Williams, p. 51-52

Newt Gingrich on Welfare & Poverty : Jun 1, 1995
Welfare vouchers allow choice & reduce bureaucracy

In Gingrich's 1984 book Window of Opportunity, welfare programs received a scant three pages. Gingrich proposed that recipients receive cash and credit card vouchers directly in order to allow more choices and, not coincidentally, chip away at the bureaucracy. It was a precursor of the plank in the Contract With America to turn programs into block grants for the states.

In 1984, Gingrich said, "No one must fall beneath a certain level of poverty, even if we must give away food and money to keep that from happening." He urged the creation of day care centers for welfare mothers who would be forced to leave home to work or study. But in another preview of the Contract With America, Gingrich suggested that minor girls should be ineligible for Aid to Families With Dependent Children if they became pregnant. Aid would go first to their parents or guardians.

Click for Newt Gingrich on other issues.   Source: Newt!, by Dick Williams, p. 39

  • Additional quotations related to Vouchers issues can be found under Education.
  • Click here for definitions & background information on Education.
Candidates on Education:
Incumbents:
Pres.Barack Obama
V.P.Joe Biden
Secy.John Kerry
Secy.Chuck Hagel

 Related issues:
NCLB
School Prayer

2016 Presidential contenders:
Mayor Michael Bloomberg(I-NYC)
Amb.John Bolton(R-MD)
Gov.Jeb Bush(R-FL)
Dr.Ben Carson(T-MD)
Gov.Chris Christie(R-NJ)
Secy.Hillary Clinton(D-NY)
Sen.Ted Cruz(T-TX)
Gov.Andrew Cuomo(D-NY)
Mayor Rahm Emanuel(D-IL)
Gov.Bobby Jindal(R-LA)
Gov.Nikk Haley(R-SC)
Rep.Peter King(R-NY)
Gov.Martin O`Malley(D-MD)
Gov.Deval Patrick(D-MA)
Sen.Rand Paul(R-KY)
Sen.Rob Portman(R-OH)
Sen.Marco Rubio(R-FL)
Gov.Jesse Ventura(I-MN)
2012 Presidential:
Rep.Michele Bachmann(T-MN)
Rep.Newt Gingrich(R-GA)
Gov.Mike Huckabee(R-AR)
Gov.Jon Huntsman(R-UT)
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Gov.Sarah Palin(R-AK)
Rep.Ron Paul(R-TX)
Gov.Rick Perry(R-TX)
Gov.Mitt Romney(R-MA)
Rep.Paul Ryan(R-WI)
Sen.Rick Santorum(R-PA)
Donald Trump(I-NY)
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Page last updated: Oct 03, 2014