issues2000

Topics in the News: North Korea


Marco Rubio on War & Peace : Apr 14, 2013
Goal for Korea: denuclearize the peninsula and to unify it

Q: On North Korea, are we following the right policies?

RUBIO: I believe the administration has acted responsibly. I think they've done three things that are important:

  1. They've made very can clear that there is not going to be any food or any conceptions in exchange for downsizing these provocations.
  2. They've repositioned assets, to do two things--they protect the US and our territory, but they also let our allies understand clearly that we are going to live up to our security commitments.
  3. I'm also encouraged that Secretary Kerry went to China and met with the president of China. Hopefully we can get the Chinese to recalibrate their relationship to North Korea and realize that what's there now on that peninsula is unsustainable.
The ultimate solution to the Korean problem is to denuclearize the peninsula and to unify it. And that's the goal we should be working towards, because what North Korea has is not a government, what North Korea is being run by is a criminal syndicate.
Click for Marco Rubio on other issues.   Source: CBS Face the Nation 2013 series: 2016 presidential hopefuls

Jon Huntsman on War & Peace : Apr 7, 2013
North Korea manipulates world to get concessions

Q: What is your level of concern about North Korea?

HUNTSMAN: We've heard this music before. For anyone who's watched the region, the North Koreans have a way of manipulating not just the regional headlines, but indeed, global headlines and then asking for concessions. And sadly, people step up and give concessions and that just continues the cycle.

Q: The truth is we don't know very much about this new leader, do we?

HUNTSMAN: Nobody knows much about this new leader.

Q: So, we don't know what he's capable of.

HUNTSMAN: You don't know what he's capable of. You know what his father did historically, the same kind of provocative cycles. But I think what we do know for sure is that these external provocations that we have witnessed are pretty much indicative of internal political challenges, which is to say that young 29-year-old Kim Jong- Un is further trying to consolidate his power among the central military commission, among the political elite.

Click for Jon Huntsman on other issues.   Source: CNN SOTU 2013 interview series: 2016 presidential hopefuls

John Bolton on Foreign Policy : Feb 20, 2013
North Korea is unnatural relic of post-WWII deal; reunify it

First, Washington, Seoul and Tokyo should make it clear that they would do everything possible to prevent or mitigate a refugee crisis following the collapse of the North Korean state.

Second, the US doesn't need or want its military forces situated along the Yalu. The American objective, currently being implemented, is to have them near the peninsula's southern tip, available and mobile for use elsewhere in Asia & the Pacific.

North Korea is an unnatural relic of a "temporary" Moscow-Washington arrangement following Japan's defeat. It has no historical claim to legitimacy as a separate state. Its citizens have never freely consented to it. And its continued existence leaves 23 million people perennially close to starvation. North Korea cannot open and survive, as the regime itself well knows. But it almost has deliverable nuclear weapons. Persuading China to support reunification is the best answer. A reunification strategy should have been pressed decades ago, but better late than never.

Click for John Bolton on other issues.   Source: AEI Scholars column: North Korean threat

Barack Obama on Free Trade : Jan 24, 2012
Double US exports via deals with Panama, Colombia, & S.Korea

Two years ago, I set a goal of doubling US exports over five years. With the bipartisan trade agreements I signed into law, we are on track to meet that goal--ahead of schedule. Soon, there will be millions of new customers for American goods in Panama, Colombia, and South Korea. Soon, there will be new cars on the streets of Seoul imported from Detroit, and Toledo, and Chicago.

I will go anywhere in the world to open new markets for American products.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2012 State of the Union speech

Mitt Romney on Foreign Policy : Dec 19, 2011
Use opportunity for regime change in North Korea

Mitt Romney called on the US to take the opportunity of dictator Kim Jong-Il's death to push for regime change in North Korea, a distinctly different message than the calls for stability and caution coming from President Obama.

"Kim Jong-il was a ruthless tyrant who lived a life of luxury while the North Korean people starved. He recklessly pursued nuclear weapons, sold nuclear and missile technology to other rogue regimes, and committed acts of military aggression against our ally South Korea. He will not be missed," Romney said. "His death represents an opportunity for America to work with our friends to turn North Korea off the treacherous course it is on and ensure security in the region. America must show leadership at this time. The North Korean people are suffering through a long and brutal national nightmare. I hope the death of Kim Jong-il hastens its end."

Click for Mitt Romney on other issues.   Source: Josh Rogin in Foreign Policy Magazine

Donald Trump on Free Trade : Dec 5, 2011
Fair trade instead of embarrassing deal with South Korea

I'm for free and fair trade. After all, I do business all over the world. But look at the deal Obama cut with South Korea. It was so bad, so embarrassing, that you can hardly believe anyone would sign such a thing. In theory, the agreement Obama signed will do next to nothing to even out the trade imbalance, will further erode American manufacturing and kill more American jobs, and will wipe away the tariffs South Korea presently pays us to sell their stuff in our country. Why would Obama agree to these terms, especially when we hold all the cards?

Why is our president signing the trade bill that the South Koreans want him to sign instead of the one that gives us maximum advantage?

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Time to Get Tough, by Donald Trump, p. 5

Newt Gingrich on Foreign Policy : Sep 12, 2011
We have failed for a decade to deal with North Korea & Iran

Q: Do you believe high defense spending is essential to security?

GINGRICH: I think we are at the edge of an enormous crisis in national security. I think that we are greatly underestimating the threat to this country. And I think that the day after we celebrated the 10th anniversary of 9/11 we should be reminded exactly what is at stake if a foreign terrorist gets a nuclear weapon into this country. We have failed for a decade to deal with North Korea. We have failed for a decade to deal with Iran. We need, frankly, to ask for a very serious national dialogue.

I'd like to see Congress holding hearings on three levels of security. What do you do in Mexico where there's a civil war underway next door to us? What do you do in the Middle East where we have totally underestimated the scale of the threat? And what do you do about our national domestic industrial base which is crucial if we're going to be competitive with China? All three of those are a major threat to us.

Click for Newt Gingrich on other issues.   Source: 2011 GOP Tea Party debate in Tampa FL

Barack Obama on Foreign Policy : Aug 30, 2011
OpEd: North Korean behavior under Bush same as under Obama

Recent history with North Korea was a pretty effective guide to how they would behave. They signed the Agreed Framework in 1994 during the Clinton administration and immediately began violating its terms, demanding payment and looking for ways to use the negotiations to blackmail the United States.

They behaved the same way with us and have brought out all their threats and demands again for the Obama administration. They have learned now, through Republican and Democratic administrations, that this is an effective way to operate. It yields concessions from the West while they continue to develop nuclear weapons. I hope a future president and secretary of state will break the cycle. This is particularly important because in the area of nonproliferation, as in so much else, the United States must lead. If we do not hold the line, few others will.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: In My Time, by V.P. Dick Cheney, p.493

Barack Obama on Education : Feb 17, 2011
To make a difference for kids, become a teacher

President Obama [said in his] State of the Nation address: "Let's also remember that after parents, the biggest impact on a child's success comes from the man or woman at the front of the classroom," said President Obama. "In South Korea, teachers are known as 'nation builders.' Here in America, it's time we treated the people who educate our children with the same level of respect."

A short time later Obama continued, "In fact, to every young person who's listening tonight contemplating their career choice: if you want to make a difference in the life of our nation; if you want to make a difference in the life of a child--become a teacher. Your country needs you."

Notice that Obama said "after parents." The President recognizes that parents and the home environment are THE most important cog in a child's education and THEN comes the teacher. That is directly opposite what Christie believes. The Governor believes that teachers are at least 50% responsible for a student's test scores.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Teachers Under Attack!, by Mike Spina, p.199

Barack Obama on Free Trade : Jan 26, 2011
Double our exports by 2014; starting with South Korea

To help businesses sell more products abroad, we set a goal of doubling our exports by 2014--because the more we export, the more jobs we create here at home. Already, our exports are up. Recently, we signed agreements with India and China that will support more than 250,000 jobs here in the US. And last month, we finalized a trade agreement with South Korea that will support at least 70,000 American jobs. This agreement has unprecedented support from business and labor, Democrats and Republicans--and I ask this Congress to pass it as soon as possible.

Before I took office, I made it clear that we would enforce our trade agreements, and that I would only sign deals that keep faith with American workers and promote American jobs. That's what we did with Korea, and that's what I intend to do as we pursue agreements with Panama and Colombia and continue our Asia Pacific and global trade talks.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2011 State of the Union speech

Rick Perry on Homeland Security : Nov 15, 2010
Invest in defense to prepare for unpredictable threats

There is no reason to believe that armed conflict with any major power is imminent, but the world is rapidly changing, and the US must be prepared for the ramifications of shifting balances of power.

North Korea and Iran, in contrast, are utterly unpredictable and do present an imminent threat with their nuclear ambitions. Kim Jon Il's regime sunk a South Korean ship, the "Cheonan", for no apparent reason, killing 46 sailors. Iran is rattling its sabers and developing nuclear technology with impunity. Hugo Chavez is harboring communist rebels in Venezuela. All of these issues require our attention and investment in defense capabilities.

Yet it is clear that after decades of ignoring the constitutional division of authority, our bloated national government is distracted and running thin on resources to perform its central mission.

Defense spending is not being squeezed out of the budget because of the explosion in entitlement spending.

Click for Rick Perry on other issues.   Source: Fed Up!, by Gov. Rick Perry, p.125-6

Marco Rubio on Free Trade : Aug 11, 2010
Continue reducing barriers to free and fair trade

We must continue reducing barriers to free and fair trade. We should adopt the free trade agreements that have already been negotiated with Colombia, Panama, South Korea and other nations around the world. We should also insist that other countries reduce their own barriers to trade so that American goods can find new markets.
Click for Marco Rubio on other issues.   Source: 2010 Senate campaign website, marcorubio.com "Reclaim"

Barack Obama on Jobs : Apr 13, 2010
OpEd: GM & Chrysler takeover put union needs ahead of others

Congressman John Carter (R-TX) compares Obama's seizure of GM and Chrysler stock and bonds to President Harry Truman's nationalization of the steel mills during the Korean War, an act the Supreme Court ruled to be unconstitutional. As Carter writes, the "Truman Administration's contention--much like the Obama Administration position today--was that the aggregate powers of the Constitution and acts of Congress created new, more far-reaching powers."

Carter points out that the "Court flatly rejected this contention, writing [in "Youngstown Sheet & Tube Company v Sawyer"] that 'nowhere in the Constitution is the executive granted the right to seize power.' The Court continued, 'Congress has not granted the President the power to take possession of property, and the Constitution does not grant the President' that power"

What Obama did in the takeover was simple. He put the rights of the unsecured stakeholders--the United Auto Workers--ahead of the bondholders, whose rights were legally secured.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Take Back America, by Dick Morris, p.116

Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Mar 2, 2010
OpEd: walked away from missile defense of Eastern Europe

Russia's burgeoning relationship with Venezuela has purpose beyond energy: anything that diminishes America pleases Putin, both because it weakens a competing power and because it gratifies his personal animus for the US. Russia's resistance to severe sanctioning of North Korea and Iran as they have pursued their nuclear programs are a stick in the eye for the US. So, too, is Russia's insistence that the world replace the dollar as the reserve currency. Putin also bitterly opposes any development that would strengthen the US such as missile defense, particularly in Eastern Europe, and admission of the former Soviet satellites into NATO. Pres. Obama's decision to walk way from our missile defense program in Poland and the Czech Republic was a huge concession to Putin, as is the stalling on admission of Georgia and the Ukraine into NATO. Russia welcomes concessions, and these, like their predecessors, were not repaid in kind. Russia takes, Pres. Obama gives, and Russia demands more.
Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: No Apology, by Mitt Romney, p. 18

Sarah Palin on Foreign Policy : Feb 6, 2010
Reaching out to hostile regimes has not worked

Misguided thinking is seen throughout the administration's foreign policy decisions. Our president spent a year reaching out to hostile regimes, writing personal letters to dangerous dictators and apologizing for America, and what do we have to show for that? Here's what we have to show. North Korea tested nuclear weapons and longer-range ballistic missiles. Israel, a friend and critical ally, now questions the strength of our support. Plans for a missile defense system in Europe, they've been scrapped. Relations with China and Russia are no better. and relations with Japan, that key Asian ally, they are in the worst shape in years.

The administration cut support for democracy programs. And where the president has not been clear, I ask where is his clear and where his strong voice of support for the Iranians who are risking all in their opposition to Ahmedinijad? We need a foreign policy that distinguishes America's friends from her enemies and recognizes the true nature of the threats that we face

Click for Sarah Palin on other issues.   Source: 2010 Tea Party Convention speeches

Barack Obama on Free Trade : Jan 29, 2010
Enforce trade being reciprocal; not just a one-way street

Rep. ROSKAM: On job creation, you mentioned Colombia, you mentioned Panama, you mentioned South Korea. Are you willing to work with us [House Republicans] to make sure those FTAs get called, that's no-cost job creation? And ultimately, as you're interacting with world leaders, that's got to put more arrows in your quiver, and that's a very powerful tool for us. But the obstacle is, frankly, the politics within the Democratic caucus?

Pres. OBAMA: You're right, there are conflicts within the Democratic Party. I suspect some Republican constituencies may be pretty suspicious about new trade agreements, because the suspicion is somehow they're all one way. Part of what we've been trying to do is to make sure that we're getting the enforcement side, that if we've got a trade agreement with China or other countries, that they are abiding with it--they're not stealing our intellectual property. And my hope is, that trade is going to be reciprocal; that it's not just going to be a one-way street.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Obama Q&A at 2010 House Republican retreat in Baltimore

Barack Obama on Foreign Policy : Jan 27, 2010
Iran is more isolated and will face growing consequences

Diplomatic efforts have strengthened our hand in dealing with those nations that insist on violating international agreements in pursuit of nuclear weapons. That's why North Korea now faces increased isolation, and stronger sanctions--sanctions that are being vigorously enforced. That's why the international community is more united, and the Islamic Republic of Iran is more isolated. And as Iran's leaders continue to ignore their obligations: They, too, will face growing consequences.
Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2010 State of the Union Address

Sarah Palin on Foreign Policy : Jan 11, 2010
2008: Learned about two Koreas, and Saddam did not plan 9/11

In Sept. 2008, Palin prepped for her first network interview with ABC News's Charlie Gibson. The campaign advisers found that, although she'd made some progress with her studies, her grasp of rudimentary facts and concepts was minimal. Palin couldn't explain why South and North Korea were separate nations. She didn't know what the Fed did. Asked who attacked American on 9/11, she suggested several times that it was Saddam Hussein. Asked to identify the enemy that her son would be fighting in Iraq, she drew a blank. (Palin's horrified advisers provided her with scripted replies, which she memorized.)

But after cramming furiously, Palin managed to emerge intact from the Gibson interview--stumbling only over whether she agreed with the "Bush doctrine" ("In what respect, Charlie?") and in discussion why the proximity of Alaska to Russia afforded her insight into its behavior on the world stage. ("They're our next door next door neighbors, and you can actually see Russia from land here in Alaska").

Click for Sarah Palin on other issues.   Source: Game Change, by Heilemann & Halpern, p.397

Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Dec 10, 2009
US has helped underwrite global security for 60 years

Whatever mistakes we have made, the plain fact is this: the United States of America has helped underwrite global security for more than six decades with the blood of our citizens and the strength of our arms. The service and sacrifice of our men and women in uniform has promoted peace and prosperity from Germany to Korea, and enabled democracy to take hold in places like the Balkans. We have borne this burden not because we seek to impose our will. We have done so out of enlightened self-interest--because we seek a better future for our children and grandchildren, and we believe that their lives will be better if other peoples' children and grandchildren can live in freedom and prosperity.

So yes, the instruments of war do have a role to play in preserving the peace. And yet this truth must coexist with another--that no matter how justified, war promises human tragedy.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech in Oslo, Norway

Barack Obama on Foreign Policy : Aug 4, 2009
2007: Pledged to meet with leaders of Iran & North Korea

In a June 2007 debate in South Carolina she again drew a sharp contrast with Obama when he unexpectedly pledged that, as president, he would willingly meet with the leaders of such rogue nations as Iran and North Korea without preconditions during his first term in office. "Well, I will not promise to meet with the leasers of these countries during my first year." Clinton interjected. "I will promise a very vigorous diplomatic effort because I think it is not that you promise a meeting at that high a level before you know what the intentions are. I don't want to be used for propaganda purposes. I don't want to make a situation even worse."

This looked like another Obama gaffe. The following day, her campaign recruited former secretary of state Madeleine Albright to lead the attack against Obama. During a telephone interview, she launched a personal attack on Obama, [saying], "I thought he was irresponsible and frankly naive."

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: The Battle for America 2008, by Balz & Johnson, p. 83-84

Hillary Clinton on Foreign Policy : Aug 4, 2009
2007: Naive to meet with leaders of Iran & North Korea

In a June 2007 debate in South Carolina she again drew a sharp contrast with Obama when he unexpectedly pledged that, as president, he would willingly meet with the leaders of such rogue nations as Iran and North Korea without preconditions during his first term in office. "Well, I will not promise to meet with the leasers of these countries during my first year." Clinton interjected. "I will promise a very vigorous diplomatic effort because I think it is not that you promise a meeting at that high a level before you know what the intentions are. I don't want to be used for propaganda purposes. I don't want to make a situation even worse."

This looked like another Obama gaffe. The following day, her campaign recruited former secretary of state Madeleine Albright to lead the attack against Obama. During a telephone interview, she launched a personal attack on Obama, [saying], "I thought he was irresponsible and frankly naive."

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: The Battle for America 2008, by Balz & Johnson, p. 83-84

Newt Gingrich on Homeland Security : Feb 27, 2009
Be prepared in a very militant and aggressive way

We are not developing national security and homeland security at the margins. This is not about stopping two snipers or three car bombers...or 5 airplanes. We live in a world where if we gamble wrong, and the current proposed defense budget is much too small, if we gamble wrong whether it is a major power like China or Russia, a medium sized power like North Korea, Pakistan, and Iran, and North Korea is a medium sized power by possession of nuclear weapons. Or it is a fanatic group willing to die in the process of killing us.

We live in a world where there are weapons capable of ending civilization as we know it. And we need to be prepared in a very militant and aggressive way to defend America from having a catastrophic disaster of the first order.

Click for Newt Gingrich on other issues.   Source: Speech to 2009 Conservative Political Action Conference

Barack Obama on Energy & Oil : Feb 24, 2009
FactCheck: Chevy Volt uses Korean battery, but Ford's don't

Obama gave a few examples of how the U.S. isn't leading when it comes to "clean, renewable energy," saying at one point that "new plug-in hybrids roll off our assembly lines, but they will run on batteries made in Korea."

He's partly right. The Chevy Volt, if it comes to market as scheduled in 2010, would be the first American-made, plug-in hybrid car, and General Motors recently announced that the Volt will use battery systems from South Korea's LG Chem Ltd.

But the U.S. isn't a complete laggard in this department. Ford said earlier this month that batteries for its hybrid, due to be available in 2012, will be supplied by a joint venture between a U.S. company, Johnson Controls Inc., and France's Saft. At least initially, though, the battery cells will be made in France; they will be assembled into power packs in the U.S.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: FactCheck.org on 2009 State of the Union address

Rahm Emanuel on Homeland Security : Jan 5, 2009
We cannot win the War on Terror without more troops

From Iran to North Korea to the Arab street, America can't stop the emergence of new nuclear states, contain loose nukes, or disrupt Al Qaeda all on its own.

If we are to win the war that we have, we must rebuild the army we need. Our friend Paul Begala's motto has become "It Takes a Battalion"--and he's right. We cannot fight and win a long war without more troops. When George Bush ran for president in 2000, he complained that the military had been hollowed out. That wasn't true then, but it is true now. Under Donald Rumsfeld, the Pentagon engaged in a drawn-out debate about military transformation but gave short shrift to the basic needs of the soldiers, the heart and soul of our military might. The army doesn't have enough troops, the National Guard and the Reserves are exhausted to the breaking point, and the soldiers we send into battle don't always get the equipment they need to survive.

Click for Rahm Emanuel on other issues.   Source: The Plan, by Rahm Emanuel, p.150

Barack Obama on Energy & Oil : Oct 15, 2008
Let’s build a fuel-efficient car in America, not abroad

Q: Can we reduce our dependence on foreign oil and by how much in the first term, in four years?

OBAMA: We can’t drill our way out of the problem. That’s why I’ve focused on putting resources into solar, wind, biodiesel, geothermal. It is absolutely critical that we develop a high fuel efficient car that’s built not in Japan and not in South Korea, but built here in the USA. We invented the auto industry and the fact that we have fallen so far behind is something that we have to work on.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2008 third presidential debate against John McCain

Barack Obama on Free Trade : Oct 15, 2008
We export only 4,000 cars to Korea; that’s not free trade!

McCAIN: When Sen. Obama said he would unilaterally renegotiate NAFTA, the Canadians said, “Yes, and we’ll sell our oil to China.”

OBAMA: For far too long, certainly during the course of the Bush administration with the support of Sen. McCain, the attitude has been that any trade agreement is a good trade agreement. And NAFTA did not have enforceable labor agreements and environmental agreements.

And what I said was we should include those and make them enforceable. In the same way that we should enforce rules against China manipulating its currency to make our exports more expensive and their exports to us cheaper.

And when it comes to South Korea, we’ve got a trade agreement up right now, they are sending hundreds of thousands of South Korean cars into the US. That’s all good. We can only get 4,000 to 5,000 into South Korea. That is not free trade. We’ve got to have a president who is going to advocate on behalf of American businesses and American workers and I make no apology for that

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2008 third presidential debate against John McCain

Sarah Palin on Homeland Security : Oct 2, 2008
Economic sanctions on North Korea for nukes

Q: What should be the trigger for nuclear weapons use?

PALIN: Our nuclear weaponry here in the US is used as a deterrent. And that’s a safe, stable way to use nuclear weaponry. For North Korea under Kim Jong Il, we have got to make sure that we’re putting economic sanctions on these countries and that we have allies supporting us in this, to make sure that leaders like Kim Jong Il & Ahmadinejad are not allowed to acquire, to proliferate, or to use those nuclear weapons. It is that important.

Click for Sarah Palin on other issues.   Source: 2008 Vice Presidential debate against Sen. Joe Biden

Sarah Palin on Homeland Security : Sep 17, 2008
Any country that houses Islamic terrorists is a danger to US

Q: What countries today pose the most danger, in your view, to America?

A: Any country that is going to house violent Islamic terrorists. We have to keep our eye, of course, on Iran. We’ve got to keep our eye on some of the ongoing activities in Russia, also. North Korea under the leadership of Kim Jong Il--certainly there is a lot of concern there.

Click for Sarah Palin on other issues.   Source: 2008 Fox News interview on “Hannity & Colmes”

Hillary Clinton on Free Trade : Nov 11, 2007
Criticized trade pacts for weak labor standards

Now courting labor and the environmentalist crowd, Hillary Clinton has come out against a trade pact with South Korea, but as senator, she has voted in support of free trade pacts with Oman, Chile and Singapore, even though she criticized them for what she said was their weak enforcement of international labor standards. In fact, she’s voted for every trade agreement that has come before her except CAFTA, the Central American version of NAFTA, the pact the public has heard the most about.
Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: The Contenders, by Laura Flanders, p. 17

John Bolton on War & Peace : Nov 6, 2007
North Korea will never give up nuclear weapons voluntarily

[Under Clinton], their catechism was always the same: North Korea can be talked out of its nuclear weapons program.

The Democratic People Republic of Korea (DPRK) will never give up nuclear weapons voluntarily. If often promises to do so, as it did in the Clinton administration's 1994 Agreed Framework. It will even more readily BARGAIN over that promise, especially in exchange for items of tangible economic and political value, such as fuel, oil, nuclear reactors, "security assurances," or removal from our list of state sponsors of terrorism. The DPRK will gladly "engage" with us, accept our concession, and then violate its own commitments. The DPRK has followed this game plan successfully many times, and it has every reason to believe it will continue to succeed into the future.

In short, the Clinton policy and the Agreed Framework were classic illustrations of the delusion that a rogue state could be coaxed out of nuclear weapons, and were embarrassments to the US.

Click for John Bolton on other issues.   Source: Surrender is Not an Option, by John Bolton, p. 99-101

John Bolton on War & Peace : Nov 6, 2007
China likes a divided Korean peninsula

China likes a divided Korean peninsula, likes having North Korea as a vassal and a buffer state between its forces and those of the US & South Korea, and fears the collapse of the Kim Jung-il regime. This policy is widely divergent from what should be the US view, which is that the DPRK regime itself is the source of the problem, which will disappear only when the regime itself disappears. To date, China has been completely unwilling to apply sufficient pressure against North Korea to make it renounce its nuclear ambitions. There are two reasons, one short-term and one long-term:
  1. China fears a wave of Korean refugees across the Yalu River, with its attendant destabilizing political and economic consequences.
  2. China fears the loss of the DPRK itself, given that South Korea and American forces would undoubtedly move to fill the security vacuum that the DPRK's implosion would entail.
Nonetheless, reunification in inevitable, as it was for Germany. China must be confronted with this reality.
Click for John Bolton on other issues.   Source: Surrender is Not an Option, by John Bolton, p.434-435

Newt Gingrich on Homeland Security : Sep 1, 2007
Contain nuclear threats:China, Russia, Pakistan, North Korea

Every day, terrorists try to acquire weapons of mass destruction & weapons of mass murder. Iran & North Korea continue to develop their nuclear and other weapons programs. There is constant danger of a coup by radical Islamists in nuclear-armed Pakistan.

And the greatest danger for us in meeting this threat is the weakness of our intelligence services. We do not have any significant intelligence on the enemy’s plans, networks, & troop strength.

Second, we must contain powers that could threaten us, including China, Russia, North Korea, Iran, & Pakistan--all of which have weapons of mass destruction.

The greatest threat of rogue dictatorships, like Iran or North Korea, is that they will sell weapons of mass destruction. While North Korea--with nuclear, chemical, & biological weapons--is a big threat to South Korea & Japan, it is a very distant threat to the US. But an Iran or a North Korea willing to sell nuclear and biological weapons to terrorists is very dangerous to America.

Click for Newt Gingrich on other issues.   Source: Gingrich Communications website, www.newt.org, “Issues”

Joe Biden on War & Peace : Jul 31, 2007
Bush invaded Iraq as the weakest of the Axis of Evil

The Bush neo-cons identified the biggest threats--North Korea, Iran, & Iraq. Toppling the Taliban had been a nice start for the Neo-cons, but they thought the way to handle the world’s malcontents and to avoid war was to take out one of the “axis of evil leaders in a way that made the others quake. They wanted to leverage our nation’s awesome military power in a way that sent a strong message: enable terrorists and we’ll wipe you out. You’re either with us, Bush liked to say of his ”war on terror,“ or you’re against us.

I thought this approach was flawed. The facts showed that terrorist groups didn’t base their training camps in countries with strong governments or dictators; they found safe haven in failed states & grew stronger in the vacuum of power.

There was a lot of noise about overthrowing Saddam Hussein. Of the three Axis of Evil countries, Iraq was the country that could put up the least military resistance, and I believed Cheney & Rumsfeld were pushing the president toward an invasion

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: Promises to Keep, by Joe Biden, p.330-331

Barack Obama on Foreign Policy : Jul 23, 2007
Meet with enemy leaders; it’s a disgrace that we have not

Q: Would you be willing to meet separately, without precondition, during the first year of your administration, with the leaders of Iran, Syria, Venezuela, Cuba and North Korea?

OBAMA: I would. And the reason is this: the notion that somehow not talking to countries is punishment to them--which has been the guiding diplomatic principle of this administration--is ridiculous. Ronald Reagan constantly spoke to Soviet Union at a time when he called them an evil empire. He understood that we may not trust them and they may pose an extraordinary danger to this country, but we had the obligation to find areas where we can potentially move forward. And I think that it is a disgrace that we have not spoken to them.

CLINTON: I will not promise to meet with the leaders of these countries during my first year. I don’t want to be used for propaganda purposes. I don’t want to make a situation even worse. But I certainly agree that we need to get back to diplomacy.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2007 YouTube Democratic Primary debate, Charleston SC

Hillary Clinton on Foreign Policy : Jul 23, 2007
Diplomacy yes; propaganda no; when meeting enemy leaders

Q: Would you be willing to meet separately, without precondition, during the first year of your administration, with the leaders of Iran, Syria, Venezuela, Cuba & N.Korea?

OBAMA: I would. The notion that somehow not talking to countries is punishment to them is ridiculous. I think that it is a disgrace that we have not spoken to them.

CLINTON: I will not promise to meet with the leaders of these countries during my first year. I will promise a very vigorous diplomatic effort but not a high level meeting before you know what the intentions are. I don’t want to be used for propaganda purposes. But I certainly agree that we need to get back to diplomacy, which has been turned into a bad word by this administration. I will use a lot of high-level presidential envoys to test the waters, to feel the way. But certainly, we’re not going to just have our president meet with Fidel Castro & Hugo Chavez & the president of North Korea, Iran & Syria until we know better what the way forward would be.

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: 2007 YouTube Democratic Primary debate, Charleston SC

Newt Gingrich on Foreign Policy : May 20, 2007
We need a dramatically expanded use of statecraft

Sen. DODD: Why aren’t we using statecraft? What’s happened to the utilization of other tools available to us--our economic, our political, our diplomatic resources--which are almost been neglected in this entire process?

GINGRICH: I partially agree with Sen. Dodd. I am not comfortable either with the current situation in Iraq, nor am I comfortable around the world with our extraordinarily limited use of statecraft. The North Koreans are cheating on their agreement on nuclear weapons. We still do not have control of Waziristan in northwest Pakistan, where Bin Laden’s probably hiding. We have been told by the UN that the Iranians are now producing at least 1300 centrifuges, producing nuclear material, and that they almost certainly will have a nuclear weapon within a year. You look around the world, the forces of freedom are on retreat, the forces that are anti-freedom, pro-dictatorship, and, in some cases, purely evil are on offense. We need a dramatically expanded ability to use statecraft.

Click for Newt Gingrich on other issues.   Source: Meet the Press: 2007 “Meet the Candidates” series

Joe Biden on Foreign Policy : Apr 26, 2007
Biggest threat to US is from North Korea, Iran, & Russia

Q: What three nations, other than Iraq, represent, to you, the biggest threat to the United States?

A: The biggest threat to the US is, right now, North Korea. Iran not as big a threat, but a long-term threat. And quite frankly, the tendency of Putin to move in a totalitarian direction, which would unhinge all that’s going on positively in Europe.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: 2007 South Carolina Democratic primary debate, on MSNBC

Newt Gingrich on War & Peace : Nov 23, 2006
Critical of how Iraq war has been fought

The former House speaker has been critical of the war and the way it has been fought. He has said the United States should withdraw most of its troops from Iraq, leaving a small force behind similar to the postwar forces in Korea and Germany.
Click for Newt Gingrich on other issues.   Source: People’s Daily (China), “Contenders views on the war”

Bobby Jindal on War & Peace : Nov 2, 2004
Prevent the proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction

Fight terrorists wherever the hide, keeping them on the run with broad strategies to disrupt terrorist’s resources and operations. Prevent the proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction, as terrorist groups attempt to steal discarded or unprotected Cold War era weapons materials. Prevent countries such as North Korea and Iran from developing nuclear weapons and missile technologies. Continue to make the tracking of terrorist financing the center of America’s counterterrorism efforts.
Click for Bobby Jindal on other issues.   Source: 2004 House campaign website, BobbyJindal.com

Barack Obama on War & Peace : Jul 12, 2004
Engage North Korea in 6-party talks

[We should] address the threat posed by North Korea. By refusing to negotiate with North Korea for three and half years, experts believe that North Korea may now be close to having six to eight nuclear weapons. We must immediately insist on complete and verifiable elimination of North Korea’s nuclear capability, engage in Six-Party bilateral talks, and facilitate a reform agenda that is broader than denuclearization to address humanitarian concerns.
Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Press Release, “Renewal of American Leadership ”

Donald Trump on War & Peace : Jul 2, 2000
Use force to stop North Korean nuke development

[In a Trump presidency], North Korea would suddenly discover that its worthless promises of civilized behavior would cut no ice. I would let Pyongyang know in no uncertain terms that it can either get out of the nuclear arms race or expect a rebuke similar to the one Ronald Reagan delivered to Ghadhafi in 1986. I don’t think anybody is going to accuse me of tiptoeing through the issues or tap-dancing around them either. Who else in public life has called for a pre-emptive strike on North Korea?
Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: The America We Deserve, by Donald Trump, p.274

Barack Obama on Government Reform : Aug 1, 1996
Campaign race baiting works in both directions

Black politicians discovered what white politicians had known for a very long time: that race-baiting could make up for a host of limitations. Younger leaders, eager to make a name for themselves, upped the ante, peddling conspiracy theories all over tow -the Koreans were funding the Klan, Jewish doctors were injecting black babies with AIDS. It was a shortcut to fame, if not always fortune; like sex or violence on TV, black rage always found a ready market. Nobody I spoke with in the neighborhood seemed to take such talk very seriously. As it was, many had already given up the hope that politics could actually improve their lives, much less make demands on them. To them, a ballot, if cast at all, was simply a ticket to a good show. Black had no real power to act on the occasional slips into anti-Semitism or Asian-bashing, people would tell me; and anyway, black folks needed a chance to let off a little steam every once in a while-what do you think those folks say about us behind our backs?
Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Dreams from My Father, by Barack Obama, p.186

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Page last updated: Mar 06, 2014