issues2000

Topics in the News: Global Warming


Hillary Clinton on Energy & Oil : Jun 10, 2014
$100B per year by 2020 for climate change mitigation

[At a climate change summit, I said] the US was prepared to lead a collective effort by developed countries to mobilize $100 billion annually by 2020 from a combination of public and private sources to help the most vulnerable nations mitigate the damage from climate change--if we could also reach a broad agreement on limiting emissions.

By offering a concrete commitment, I hoped to breathe new life into the talks, put pressure on China and the other "emerging emitters" to respond, and win support from developing countries.

In the end, the leaders fashioned a deal that, while far from perfect, put us on the road to future progress. For the first time all major economies, developed and developing alike, agreed to make national commitments to curb carbon emissions through 2020 and report transparently on their mitigation efforts. The world began moving away from the division between developed and developing countries that had defined the Kyoto agreement. This was a foundation to build on.

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: Hard Choices, by Hillary Clinton, p.498-500

Barack Obama on Energy & Oil : Jan 29, 2014
FactCheck: Yes, US reduced CO2 tonnage, but that's only 6%

Obama rehashed a boast first made in a major speech on climate change last summer, that "the United States has reduced our total carbon pollution more than any other nation on Earth." That's accurate in terms of the sheer tonnage of emissions reduced. But dozens of nations have reduced their carbon dioxide emissions by a larger percentage than the US.

The US emitted 5,491 million metric tons of carbon dioxide in 2011. That's 362 million metric tons fewer than what was emitted in the US in 2003.

But some perspective is in order. The US improvement results are different when the reduction amount is measured by the percentage change. By that measure, dozens of countries fared better than the US, which reduced its emissions by 6.2%, including Also noteworthy, the EIA credited most of the U.S. reduction in carbon pollution to slower economic growth, weather, higher gasoline prices and an increasing shift from coal to natural gas--not necessarily the government's energy policy, as claimed by Ob

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: FactCheck.org on 2014 State of the Union address

Barack Obama on Energy & Oil : Jan 28, 2014
Natural gas is a "bridge fuel"; then go solar

One of the biggest factors in bringing more jobs back is our commitment to American energy. The all-of-the-above energy strategy I announced a few years ago is working, and today, America is closer to energy independence than we've been in decades.

One of the reasons why is natural gas--if extracted safely, it's the bridge fuel that can power our economy with less of the carbon pollution that causes climate change.

It's not just oil and natural gas production that's booming; we're becoming a global leader in solar, too. Every four minutes, another American home or business goes solar; every panel pounded into place by a worker whose job can't be outsourced. Let's continue that progress with a smarter tax policy that stops giving $4 billion a year to fossil fuel industries that don't need it, so that we can invest more in fuels of the future that do.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2014 State of the Union address

Joe Biden on Energy & Oil : May 9, 2013
Pushed cap-and-trade early; but $90B tax credits passed

Q: Why doesn't the Obama administration use the bully pulpit to talk about climate change like it does for gun control?

A: We have. In his inaugural address, the president said, "We will respond to the threat of climate change, knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations." In the very beginning, we decided that we had to move on this. And we thought, cap-and-trade. But it got shut down, even when we had a Democratic Congress. So from that point on, the president has been trying to figure out how he can use his executive authority to make some real changes.

Q: Despite the congressional opposition, do you feel the Obama administration has made inroads in the climate fight?

A: The thing I'm proudest of that we were able to get done in the first term was the Recovery Act. It had $90 billion in clean-energy programs. We had a lot of money going into research and development, and also tax credits for wind and solar energy.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: Douglas Brinkley in Rolling Stone Magazine

Barack Obama on Energy & Oil : Feb 12, 2013
Bipartisan market-based solution to climate change

I urge this Congress to pursue a bipartisan, market-based solution to climate change, like the one John McCain and Joe Lieberman worked on together a few years ago. But if Congress won't act soon to protect future generations, I will. I will direct my Cabinet to come up with executive actions we can take, now and in the future, to reduce pollution, prepare our communities for the consequences of climate change, and speed the transition to more sustainable sources of energy.
Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2013 State of the Union Address

Joe Biden on Energy & Oil : Feb 4, 2013
Set out vision for young people to deal with global warming

I was impressed in the discussion [French President Hollande and I] had relative to climate change. The President pointed out that there is an obligation here that extends way beyond these administrations. There is a need to set out a vision for the young people in both our countries that we understand. It's a rallying cry that can be a call for a united effort and support in both our countries to deal with global warming.

President Obama is committed to do that. And he is going to have an interlocutor in John Kerry. There is no one in my country who has been, over the period of time he's been in the Senate, more concerned with or knowledgeable about the issues relating to global warming.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: Press Conference with V.P. Biden & French President Hollande

Jerry Brown on Technology : Jan 24, 2013
I signed high speed rail in 1982; finally done in 2013

In the years following World War II, California embarked on a vast program to build highway, bridges and roads. Most were constructed before we knew about climate change and the lethal effects of dirty air. We now expect more.

Last year, you authorized another big project: High Speed Rail. Electrified trains are part of the future. China already has 5000 miles of high speed rail and intends to double that. Spain has 1600 miles and is building more. More than a dozen other countries have their own successful high speed rail systems.

The first phase constructs 30 miles of tunnels and bridges [in the] Tehachapi Mountains . Then we will build another 33 miles of tunnels and bridges before we get the train to its destination at Union Station in the heart of Los Angeles.

It has taken great perseverance to get us this far. I signed the original high speed rail Authority in 1982--over 30 years ago. In 2013, we will finally break ground and start construction.

Click for Jerry Brown on other issues.   Source: 2013 State of the State address to California Legislature

Barack Obama on Energy & Oil : Sep 4, 2012
First-ever carbon pollution limits for new oil & coal plants

Q: What is your position on cap-and-trade, carbon taxes, and other policies proposed to address global climate change--and what steps can we take to improve our ability to tackle challenges like climate change that cross national boundaries?

A: Climate change is the one of the biggest issues of this generation, and we have to meet this challenge by driving smart policies that lead to greater growth in clean energy generation and result in a range of economic and social benefits. Since taking office I have established historic standards limiting greenhouse gas emissions from our vehicles for the first time in history. My administration has made unprecedented investments in clean energy, proposed the first-ever carbon pollution limits for new fossil-fuel-fired power plants & reduced carbon emissions within the Federal Government. Since I took office, the US is importing an average of 3 million fewer barrels of oil every day, & our dependence on foreign oil is at a 20-year low.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: The Top American Science Questions, by sciencedebate.org

Mitt Romney on Energy & Oil : Sep 4, 2012
No consensus on extent of global warming or human activity

Q: What is your position on cap-and-trade, carbon taxes, and other policies proposed to address global climate change--and what steps can we take to improve our ability to tackle challenges like climate change that cross national boundaries?

A: I am not a scientist myself, but my best assessment of the data is that the world is getting warmer, that human activity contributes to that warming, and that policymakers should therefore consider the risk of negative consequences. However, there remains a lack of scientific consensus on the issue--on the extent of the warming, the extent of the human contribution, and the severity of the risk--and I believe we must support continued debate and investigation within the scientific community. Ultimately, the science is an input to the public policy decision; it does not dictate a particular policy response.

Click for Mitt Romney on other issues.   Source: The Top American Science Questions, by sciencedebate.org

Paul Ryan on Principles & Values : Aug 27, 2012
Side-by-side issue comparison to Joe Biden

Does the Democratic Vice President Joe Biden agree with Republican Vice-Presidential nominee Paul Ryan on anything? Nope, not among international issues like those listed below. We researched their voting records; their political biographies; their speeches and websites; and present their issue stances side-by-side on each of the following topics (and economic issues and social issues as well):
Click for Paul Ryan on other issues.   Source: Paperback: Obama-Biden vs. Romney-Ryan On The Issues

Marco Rubio on Energy & Oil : Jun 19, 2012
I dislike cap-&-trade, but it is inevitable as national law

The previous summer the governor had issued a series of executive orders instituting global warming cap-and-trade regulations, which would become law unless the legislature overrode them. We passed a bill that instructed Florida's Dept. of Environmental Protection to create an outline of cap-and-trade plan for the state. However, the plan couldn't take effect unless the legislature approved it. The governor signed it because he could claim he got a signature initiative passed by the legislature. The legislature passed it because we knew we could stop it later.

[During the Senate primary], Crist falsely claimed I had supported cap and trade. He cited an interview in which I made the assumption that some form of cap and trade would eventually become national law. I suggested that Florida should prepare for the inevitable by adopting a policy of its own. But I didn't support cap and trade. I wrote an opinion piece denouncing the governor's executive orders shortly after he announced them.

Click for Marco Rubio on other issues.   Source: An American Son, by Marco Rubio, p.157-158

Barack Obama on Energy & Oil : Feb 28, 2012
2009: Spark a clean energy transformation

On Friday, June 26, 2009, Democrats made history. For the 1st time, a cap and trade bill--sponsored by Representatives Henry Waxman and Ed Markey--passed in the House of Representatives. Notably absent in Obama's ringing endorsement of the bill was any mention of global warming or climate change--or cap and trade for that matter:

"This week, the House of Representatives is moving ahead on historic legislation that will transform the way we produce and use energy in America. This legislation will spark a clean energy transformation that will reduce our dependence on foreign oil and confront the carbon pollution that threatens our planet.

This energy bill will create a set of initiatives that will spur the development of new sources of energy, including wind, solar, and geothermal power. It will also spur new energy savings, like efficient windows and other materials that reduce heating costs in the winter and cooling costs in the summer."

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: The Greatest Hoax, by James Inhofe, p.109

Newt Gingrich on Energy & Oil : Feb 28, 2012
2008: Our country must take action to address climate change

In 2008, Newt Gingrich sat on a couch in front of the Capitol holding hands with Nancy Pelosi, saying while he and Pelosi rarely agreed, "We do agree our country must take action to address climate change," and "If enough of us demand action from our leaders, we can spark the innovation that we need." Al Gore's Alliance for Climate Protection sponsored the ad. I applaud Newt for saying 3 years after the couch episode, "That is probably the dumbest single thing I've done in recent years."
Click for Newt Gingrich on other issues.   Source: The Greatest Hoax, by James Inhofe, p. 72

Barack Obama on Government Reform : Feb 28, 2012
OpEd: Achieve via regulation what was blocked in legislation

Even though global warming hysteria and cap and trade are long dead, the fight is far from over because President Obama is now moving forward with a plan to achieve through regulation what could not be achieved through legislation. In December of 2009, the Obama EPA issued what it called the "endangerment finding"--a finding that greenhouse gases harm public health and welfare. Armed with this "finding" the EPA is planning to regulate greenhouse gases instead through the Clean Air Act, which was never meant to regulate carbon. Like cap and trade, this plan will have the same $300-$400 billion pricetag, it will put the same amount of jobs in jeopardy, and it will cause the same amount of havoc for our economy. My fight today is to stop them from achieving this cap and trade agenda through the back door.
Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: The Greatest Hoax, by James Inhofe, p. ix

Newt Gingrich on Energy & Oil : Dec 1, 2011
1989: prevent global warming; 2012: unclear if warming real

Gingrich said it's unclear whether man-made global warming is real. "I believe we don't know," he told Fox News' Sean Hannity in an interview.

In 2008 Gingrich appeared in an ad with then-House Speaker Nancy Pelosi urging action on climate change. "Our country must take action to address climate change," he said in 2008. Gingrich recently said that the ad was "the dumbest thing I've done in recent years."

Earlier in his career, Gingrich co-sponsored a 1989 bill stating that climate change was "resulting from human activities."

    Findings in the Global Warming Prevention Act of 1989 (HR.1078): The Congress finds that:
  1. the Earth's atmosphere is being changed at an unprecedented rate by pollutants resulting from human activities
  2. global warming will accelerate the present sea level rise and thereby threaten to inundate low-lying coastal lands
  3. global warming imperils human health and well-being
  4. global warming will jeopardize prospects for sustainable development.
Click for Newt Gingrich on other issues.   Source: Huffington Post, "Global Warming"

Mitt Romney on Energy & Oil : Nov 22, 2011
Humans contribute to world getting warmer

Romney is no flat-earth reactionary, acknowledging the realities of global warming and calling for new, tough international energy and greenhouse gas policies "that both reduce greenhouse gas emissions and global dependence on oil."

In summer 2010, he delivered an unequivocal response to questions about his views on the deterioration of the environment: "I don't speak for the scientific community, of course, but I believe the world's getting warmer. I can't prove that, but I believe based on what I read that the world is getting warmer. And number two, I believe that humans contribute to that. I don't know how much our contribution is to that, because I know that there have been periods of greater heat and warmth in the past, but I believe we contribute to that. And so I think it's important for us to reduce our emissions of pollutants and greenhouse gases that may well be significant contributors to the climate change and the global warming that you're seeing."

Click for Mitt Romney on other issues.   Source: An Inside Look, by R.B.Scott, p.195

Condoleezza Rice on Energy & Oil : Nov 1, 2011
Kyoto Protocol fatally flawed, but address climate change

The first confrontation with our European allies was climate change. During the 2000 campaign the governor had been clearly opposed to the Kyoto Protocol.

In 2001, the President wrote to four Republican senators who had asked the administration to clarify its position on limiting greenhouse pollutants. I told the President we needed to change one sentence, which criticized the Kyoto Protocol in the harshest possible terms and suggested we would have nothing to do with it. I wanted to add mitigatin language saying that even though we could not support the treaty because it was fatally flawed, we would work with our allies to address the problem of climate change. But the President said, "It's too late."

In fairness to the President, I think he had thought of the letter as addressing a DOMESTIC issue for our Congress. But I knew better. We suffered through this issue over the years: drawing that early line in the sand helped to establish our reputation for "unilateralism." We handled it badly.

Click for Condoleezza Rice on other issues.   Source: No Higher Honor, by Condoleezza Rice, p. 41-42

Sarah Palin on Environment : Sep 20, 2011
2007: Opposed listing polar bears as endangered species

She took time to oppose the listing of polar bears as an endangered species. "The polar bear has become a metaphor in the highly charged climate debate," she said. Her stance on the issue was clear: only snake oil science suggested that man-made carbon emissions were responsible for global warning, not that she believed in global warming. In Sarah's mind, God managed the earth's climate and he'd done pretty darned good job up to now.
Click for Sarah Palin on other issues.   Source: The Rogue, by Joe McGinniss, p.228

Rick Perry on Energy & Oil : Sep 7, 2011
Don't put economy in jeopardy based on unsettled science

Q: You said scientists are coming forward to question the idea that human activity is behind climate change.

PERRY: The science is not settled on this. The idea that we would put Americans' economy in jeopardy based on scientific theory that's not settled yet, to me, is just nonsense. I mean, Galileo got outvoted for a spell. But asking us to cut back in areas that would have monstrous economic impact on this country is not good economics and I will suggest to you is not necessarily good science. Find out what the science truly is before you start putting the American economy in jeopardy.

Q: Are there specific theories that you've found especially compelling?

PERRY: Let me tell you what I find compelling, is what we've done in the state of Texas. Not by some scientist somewhere saying, "Here is what we think is happening out there." The science is not settled on whether or not the climate change is being impacted by man to the point where we're going to put America's economics in jeopardy.

Click for Rick Perry on other issues.   Source: 2011 GOP debate in Simi Valley CA at the Reagan Library

Rick Perry on Energy & Oil : Sep 7, 2011
FactCheck: Yes, climate change is settled science

Perry said on global warming, "The science is not settled on this. The idea that we would put Americans' economy at jeopardy based on scientific theory that's not settled yet, to me, is just, is nonsense. Find out what the science truly is before you start putting the American economy in jeopardy."

THE FACTS: The scientific consensus on climate change is about as settled as any major scientific issue can be. Perry's opinion runs counter to the view of an overwhelming majority of scientists that pollution released from the burning of fossil fuels is heating up the planet. The National Academy of Sciences, in an investigation requested by Congress, concluded last year: "Climate change is occurring, is very likely caused primarily by human activities, and poses significant risks to humans and the environment."

Click for Rick Perry on other issues.   Source: AP FactCheck on 2011 GOP debate in Simi Valley CA

Rick Perry on Environment : Sep 7, 2011
We reduced NO2 and ozone in TX without scientists dictating

Q: Are there specific scientists that you've found especially compelling on climate change?

PERRY: Let me tell you what I find compelling, is what we've done in Texas, using our ability to regulate our clean air. We cleaned up our air in the state of Texas, more than any other state in the nation during the decade. Nitrous oxide levels, down by 57%. Ozone levels down by 27%. That's the way you need to do it, not by some scientist somewhere saying, "Here is what we think is happening out there."

Click for Rick Perry on other issues.   Source: 2011 GOP debate in Simi Valley CA at the Reagan Library

Gary Johnson on Energy & Oil : Jun 15, 2011
I accept global warming but not cap-and-trade

Q: What about climate?

A: I accept the fact that there is global warming and I accept the fact that it's man caused. That said, I am opposed to cap and trade. I'm a free market guy when it comes to the clean environment the number-one factor when it comes to the clean environment is a good economy.

Q: You don't think there's a policy response? It's making people richer that would help?

A: Good economies results in cleaner environment. That's been the history of the planet till this point.

Click for Gary Johnson on other issues.   Source: Tim Dickinson in Rolling Stone Magazine

Deval Patrick on Energy & Oil : Apr 12, 2011
At Texaco: stop arguing about climate change & seek solution

I'd like to think that my commitment to social justice remained consistent even when I wasn't in the public sector. When I became a corporate executive, I tried to maintain a personal pledge to do good.

I worked to make Texaco the first major oil company to stop arguing about the science of climate change and to join those in search of solutions.

At Coca Cola, I learned that I need not and would not leave my conscience at the door for any job. Most of the people I worked with shared those values.

Social justice was never far from my mission, even in those corporate settings. I know we made the workplace in both companies more fair and transparent.

Click for Deval Patrick on other issues.   Source: A Reason to Believe, by Gov. Deval Patrick, p.161-163

Jesse Ventura on Energy & Oil : Apr 4, 2011
Military agrees: climate change represents a serious threat

Back in 2006, the Center for Naval Analyses (CNA), a federally funded R&D center for the Navy and Marine Corps, brought together a Military Advisory Board of eleven retired three-star and four-star admirals and generals. Their task was to examine the impact of global climate change for future national security. The report came out in April 2007. Its conclusion is that climate represents "a serious threat" that is likely to create "instability in some of the most volatile regions of the world."

I find it very chilling that the U.S. military would recognize this situation and begin preparations for us how to deal with it, when many of our elected officials are still prepared to think climate change is some kind of hoax! We're like the proverbial ostrich with its head buried in the sand.

Click for Jesse Ventura on other issues.   Source: 63 Documents, by Gov. Jesse Ventura, p.157

Bobby Jindal on Energy & Oil : Nov 15, 2010
Cap-and-trade is a jobs bill for other countries

The liberal attack on fossil fuels doesn't even make sense in the context of global warming--destroying our domestic energy production and manufacturing base and expanding our jobs abroad won't cut the world's carbon emissions. In fact, these jobs will go to countries like Mexico, China, & India, while more of our oil and natural gas will come from countries like Venezuela, Saudi Arabia, & Russia--all of which have much weaker environmental laws than we do. Do you really think a smokestack in Tijuana will produce fewer emissions than one in San Diego?

Keep that in mind next time you hear the Democrats' proposals for a "cap and trade" scheme. In addition to increasing utility costs of homeowners, charging our own companies for releasing carbon will provoke a lot of them simply to relocate to countries that don't charge these fees. Still, at least the Democrats' rhetoric is honest on this issue. Cap and trade IS a jobs bill--for other countries. It is a win/win--for the rest of the world

Click for Bobby Jindal on other issues.   Source: Leadership and Crisis, by Bobby Jindal, p.209

John Bolton on Energy & Oil : May 18, 2010
Increased taxation is not the answer to global warming

The mother of all such plans is in the environmental area: the Kyoto/Copenhagen global warming enterprise. Buried in the failed Copenhagen negotiations were critical provisions to generate funding for "climate change" activities completely free of congressional action.

There are many grounds to oppose Copenhagen's statist agenda, but the issue of taxation should be one of the most important. Whatever the reality of the earth's changing temperature and humanity's role in it, the fundamental debate should be over the proposed solutions. If increased taxation, regulation, and control at the national or international levels are the answers, we are clearly asking the wrong questions.

Click for John Bolton on other issues.   Source: Obama is Endangering our Sovereignty, by John Bolton, p. 35

Barack Obama on Technology : May 18, 2010
Network clean energy transmission lines like highway network

Obama offered the climate change czarina billions more in the stimulus for construction of the so-called smart grid. Obama agreed with Al Gore that boosting clean energy wouldn't mean much without building a new network of modern national transmission lines for electricity. The real goal, he thought, should be to make the grid akin to the Interstate Highway system in the 1950s or the Internet in the 1990s: a prime engine of growth for the economy. He liked to talk about thousands of miles of transmission lines and 40 million "smart meters" across the country.

But reality soon intruded. The NIMBY ("not in my backyard") problem afflicted the smart-grid debate. The regulatory hurdles to modernizing the grid were beyond belief; it turned out that no fewer than 31 different state and local regulators had to sign off on modernization. Obama was appalled. "We went to the moon!" he said. "We can do better than this! Go back and talk to more people."

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: The Promise: Obama Year One, by Jonathan Alter, p. 89

Newt Gingrich on Energy & Oil : May 17, 2010
Doomsday climate theory pushes massive wealth transfer

A global, left-wing environmental movement organized around a doomsday theory of climate change is pushing for a massive wealth transfer for the West to developing nations, and an enormous increase in bureaucratic control but governments. Meanwhile, UN-designated experts and an alliance of global bureaucrats are lobbying for treaties to enforce international climate change regulations within a system of global taxation. This entire "solution" is a kind of class warfare applied to nation states.

With our historical emphasis on free enterprise and national sovereignty, Americans have resisted these extreme measures. But we believe genuine environmental problems, many of them ignored due to the global warming obsessions, cannot be resolved without U.S. leadership.

Click for Newt Gingrich on other issues.   Source: To Save America, by Newt Gingrich, p.235-236

Barack Obama on Environment : May 17, 2010
Greenhouse gases declared dangerous to public health

As the UN's annual climate change conference began in Copenhagen on December 7, 2009, Obama's EPA chief, Lisa Jackson, announced the EPA now considers six greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide and methane, dangerous to the environment and public health, and that the EPA would begin drawing up new regulations to arbitrarily reduce them.

The announcement deliberately coincided with the climate change conference, which aims to establish an international treaty to reduce greenhouse emissions. Of course, the president cannot implement a treaty by himself; he needs the approval of two-thirds of the U.S. Senate. So the EPA's announcement was actually a threat to circumvent the Senate's constitutional prerogatives. Obama was indicating he would commit the United States to carbon-cutting goals reached at Copenhagen, and if the Senate refused to approve a carbon-cutting treaty or to pass capo and trade, Obama would simply use the EPA to regulate carbon whether the Senate likes it or not.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: To Save America, by Newt Gingrich, p. 81

Mitt Romney on Energy & Oil : Mar 2, 2010
Climate change is occurring, with SOME human contribution

I believe that climate change is occurring--the reduction in the size of global ice caps is hard to ignore. I also believe that human activity is a contributing factor.

I am uncertain how much of the warming, however, is attributable to man and how much is attributable to factors out of our control. I do not support radical feel-good policies like a unilateral US cap-and-trade mandate. Such policies would have little effect on the climate but could cripple economic growth.

Oil is purported to be one of the primary contributors to rising global temperatures. If in fact global warming is importantly caused by our energy appetite, it's yet one more reason for going on an energy diet.

Scientists are nearly unanimous in laying the blame for rising temperatures on greenhouse gas emissions. Of course there are also reasons for skepticism. The earth may be getting warmer, but there have been numerous times in the earth's history when temperatures have been warmer than they are now.

Click for Mitt Romney on other issues.   Source: No Apology, by Mitt Romney, p.227

Mitt Romney on Energy & Oil : Mar 2, 2010
Nuclear power is a win-win: no CO2 and no imports

As nations like China and India make available to their citizens the automobiles, home heaters, air conditioners and appliances that we take for granted in the West, their energy demands--and their emissions--will rise dramatically. Internationally, we should work to limit the increase in emissions in global greenhouse gases.

Whether global warming or energy security is one's primary concern, everyone agrees that finding substitute fuels for oil is a good thing.

Nuclear power is a win-win; it's a domestic energy source with zero greenhouse emissions. Nuclear power poses the single largest opportunity to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. Without increased nuclear generation, global temperatures cannot achieve the two-degree Celsius goal. So if you're serious about global warming, you have to say yes to nuclear; and if like me you're serious about energy security, you get to the same place.

Click for Mitt Romney on other issues.   Source: No Apology, by Mitt Romney, p.230&239-240

Mitt Romney on Principles & Values : Mar 2, 2010
President should proudly defend US, not apologize for her

President Obama's presupposition is that America is in a state of inevitable decline. A recurring theme in Pres. Obama's rhetoric is that "more than at any point in human history, the interest of nations and peoples are shared" and that the "common interests of human beings"--ending global warming, stopping nuclear proliferation, achieving peace and prosperity--is stronger than the differences among nations. Pres. Obama envisions himself as the world's great bridge builder and synthesizer.

In a world composed of nations that are filled with rage and hate for the US, our president should proudly defend her rather than continually apologize for her.

I reject the view that America must decline. I believe in American exceptionalism. I am convinced that we can act together to strengthen the nation, to preserve our global leadership, and to protect freedom where it exits and promote it where it does not.

Click for Mitt Romney on other issues.   Source: No Apology, by Mitt Romney, p. 28-29

Barack Obama on Energy & Oil : Nov 30, 2009
Cap-and-trade: lower CO2 levels by fees on carbon emissions

Obama's solution to climate change is an ambitious new regulatory scheme called "cap-and-trade."

The point of cap-and-trade is to lower the earth's CO2 levels by forcing people to pay to produce or emit carbon. A carbon tax would be the most straightforward way to achieve this, but industry lobbyists and most politicians, including Barack Obama and John McCain, favor cap-and-trade., We can guess a few of the reasons.

First, cap-and-trade is not called a "tax," which makes it easier to sell, even though it functions much like a tax. Probably more important--cap-and-trade necessarily involves more political tinkering and more lobbying.

Cap-and-trade requires an emitter to pay for his emissions with special permits. The government would dictate how many permits are in circulation.

But this basic groundwork leaves many questions--and corporate lobbyists are eager to help Congress and the Obama administration answer them.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Obamanomics, by Timothy P. Carney, p.105-106

Sarah Palin on Energy & Oil : Nov 13, 2009
FactCheck: Yes, Obama climate law costs consumers $145/year

PALIN: Says Obama has admitted that the climate change policy he seeks will cause people's electricity bills to "skyrocket."

THE FACTS: She correctly quotes a comment attributed to Obama in January 2008, when he told San Francisco Chronicle editors that under his cap-and-trade climate proposal, "electricity rates would necessarily skyrocket" as utilities are forced to retrofit coal burning power plants to reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

Obama has argued since then that climate legislation can blunt the cost to consumers. Democratic legislation now before Congress calls for a variety of measures aimed at mitigating consumer costs. Several studies predict average household costs probably would be $100 to $145 a year.

Click for Sarah Palin on other issues.   Source: AP Fact Check about "Going Rogue", in NY Times

Barack Obama on Energy & Oil : Sep 22, 2009
History will pass judgment on our response to climate change

Recently, I acknowledged 2 positive actions: his attempt to make health care available to the 47 million Americans who don't have access to it, and his concern about climate change. The views of many heads of state on the ignored and neglected issue of climate change are still unknown. As the representative of the country hosting the UN high-level meeting on the issue, Obama was the 1st to express his opinion. What did he say? I will refer to the substance of his remarks:
Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Obama and the Empire, by Fidel Castro, p. 91-2

Jeb Bush on Energy & Oil : Aug 1, 2009
I'm a skeptic about global warming

Q: Do you believe global warming is primarily man-made?

A: I'm a skeptic. I'm not a scientist. I think the science has been politicized. I would be very wary of hollowing out our industrial base even further. It may be only partially man-made. It may not be warming by the way. The last six years we've actually had mean temperatures that are cooler. I think we need to be very cautious before we dramatically alter who we are as a nation because of it.

Click for Jeb Bush on other issues.   Source: Tucker Carlson interview of Jeb Bush in Esquire

Rahm Emanuel on Energy & Oil : Jan 5, 2009
Backing away from Kyoto was policy error & economic error

Backing away from the Kyoto agreement on climate change was not only a foreign policy blunder, but an economic one. A climate change agreement would force the US to adopt a real energy plan, and to seize the lead in development of energy-efficient technologies. Energy efficiency can enable our economy to keep growing, even as we begin to curb our contribution to climate change. For example, the average efficiency of America's 10,000 electric power plants--33%--hasn't improved since 1960. Transmission losses on power lines have doubled since 1970. Distributed energy systems like solar and wind power have the potential to achieve efficiencies as high as 90%.
Click for Rahm Emanuel on other issues.   Source: The Plan, by Rahm Emanuel, p.165-166

Joe Biden on Energy & Oil : Oct 2, 2008
Obama believes in investing in alternative energy

BIDEN: We have 3 percent of the world’s oil reserves. We consume 25% of the oil. John has voted 20 times in the last decade-and-a-half against funding alternative energy sources, clean energy sources, wind, solar, biofuels. Obama believes by investing in clean coal and safe nuclear, we can not only create jobs in wind and solar here, we can export it.

PALIN: I was the first governor to form a climate change sub-cabinet to start dealing with the impacts. We’ve got to reduce emissions. John McCain is right there with an “all of the above” approach to deal with climate change impacts. As we rely more on other countries that don’t care as much about the climate as we do, we’re allowing them to produce and to emit and even pollute more than America would ever stand for. It’s all the more reason that we have an “all of the above” approach, tapping into alternative sources of energy and conserving fuel, conserving our petroleum products and our hydrocarbons so that we can clean up this planet

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: 2008 Vice Presidential debate against Sarah Palin

Sarah Palin on Energy & Oil : Oct 2, 2008
Cyclical temperature changes affect climate change

Q: What is true and what is false about what we have heard about the causes of climate change?

PALIN: As governor of the nation’s only Arctic state, Alaska feels & sees impacts of climate change more so than any other state. And we know that it’s real. I’m not one to attribute every activity of man to the changes in the climate. There is something to be said also for man’s activities, but also for the cyclical temperature changes on our planet. But there are real changes going on in our climate. And I don’t want to argue about the causes. What I want to argue about is, how are we going to get there to positively affect the impacts? We have got to clean up this planet. We have got to encourage other nations also to come along with us with the impacts of climate change, what we can do about that.

BIDEN: Well, I think it’s clearly manmade. If you don’t understand what the cause is, it’s virtually impossible to come up with a solution. We know what the cause is. The cause is manmade.

Click for Sarah Palin on other issues.   Source: 2008 Vice Presidential debate against Sen. Joe Biden

Sarah Palin on Energy & Oil : Oct 2, 2008
All-of-the-above approach to deal with climate change

PALIN: I was the first governor to form a climate change sub-cabinet to start dealing with the impacts. We’ve got to reduce emissions. John McCain is right there with an “all of the above” approach to deal with climate change impacts. As we rely more on other countries that don’t care as much about the climate as we do, we’re allowing them to produce and to emit and even pollute more than America would ever stand for. It’s all the more reason that we have an “all of the above” approach, tapping into alternative sources of energy and conserving fuel, conserving our petroleum products and our hydrocarbons so that we can clean up this planet.

BIDEN: We have 3% of the world’s oil reserves. We consume 25% of the oil. John has voted 20 times in the last decade-and-a-half against funding alternative energy sources, clean energy sources, wind, solar, biofuels. Obama believes by investing in clean coal and safe nuclear, we can not only create jobs in wind and solar here, we can export it.

Click for Sarah Palin on other issues.   Source: 2008 Vice Presidential debate against Joe Biden

Joe Biden on Energy & Oil : Oct 2, 2008
Cause of global warming is clearly Man-made

Q: What is true and what is false about what we have heard about the causes of climate change?

PALIN: As governor of the nation’s only Arctic state, Alaska feels & sees impacts of climate change more so than any other state. And we know that it’s real. I’m not one to attribute every activity of man to the changes in the climate. There is something to be said also for man’s activities, but also for the cyclical temperature changes on our planet. But there are real changes going on in our climate. And I don’t want to argue about the causes. What I want to argue about is, how are we going to get there to positively affect the impacts?

BIDEN: Well, I think it is manmade. I think it’s clearly manmade. If you don’t understand what the cause is, it’s virtually impossible to come up with a solution. We know what the cause is. The cause is manmade. That’s the cause. That’s why the polar icecap is melting.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: 2008 Vice Presidential debate against Gov. Sarah Palin

Sarah Palin on Energy & Oil : Aug 29, 2008
Global warming affects Alaska, but is not man-made

Q: What is your take on global warming and how is it affecting our country?

A: A changing environment will affect Alaska more than any other state, because of our location. I’m not one though who would attribute it to being man-made.

Click for Sarah Palin on other issues.   Source: Q&A with Newsmax.com’s Mike Coppock

Joe Biden on Foreign Policy : Aug 27, 2008
The US is less secure and more isolated in recent history

Our country is less secure and more isolated that it has been any time it has in recent history. The Bush foreign policy has dug us into a very deep hole, with very few friends to help us climb out. For the last seven years, the administration has failed to face the biggest forces shaping this century. The emergence of Russia, China and India’s great powers, the spread of lethal weapons, the shortage of secure supplies of energy, food and water. The challenge of climate change and the resurgence of fundamentalism in Afghanistan and Pakistan, the real central front in the war on terror. We once again see the consequences of the neglect of Russia challenging the very freedom of a new democratic country of Georgia. Barack and I will end that neglect. We will hold Russia accountable for its action and we will help Georgia rebuild. I have been on the ground in Georgia, Iraq, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and I can tell you in no uncertain terms, this administration’s policy has been an abysmal failure.
Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: Speech at 2008 Democratic National Convention

Barack Obama on Energy & Oil : May 4, 2008
Figure out how to sequester carbon and burn clean coal

Q: In terms of global warming, you’ve talked about wind and solar and biofuels. What about nuclear?

A: I think we do have to look at nuclear, and what we’ve got to figure out is can we store the material properly? Can we make sure that they’re secure? Can we deal with the expense? My attitude when it comes to energy is there’s no silver bullet. We’ve got to look at every possible option. You know, I’ve said the same thing about coal. I have a aggressive goal of reducing carbon emissions, and coal is a dirty fuel right now. But if we can figure out how to sequester carbon and burn clean coal, we’re the Saudi Arabia of coal, and I don’t think that we can dismiss out of hand the use of coal as part of our energy mix. What we are going to have to understand, though, is that global warming is real, it is serious and that whatever options we come up with, if they are not addressing the fact that the planet is getting warmer, then we are failing not just this generation, but future generations.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Meet the Press: 2008 “Meet the Candidates” series

Hillary Clinton on Energy & Oil : Apr 13, 2008
Cap-and-trade as president; compact fluorescents at home

Q: Can we address global poverty and climate change without changing our standard of living?

A: I believe there is so much we can do that would not demonstrably undermine our standard of living, but it would give us the opportunity to set an example an to be a model. There are simple steps any one of us can take--turning off lights when one leaves a room, unplugging appliances, changing to compact fluorescent bulbs--my husband and I have done that & we feel like we’re making a small contribution to limiting the amount of greenhouse gas emissions. I hope that, as president, I can model that and lead that effort so that people don’t feel so threatened by the changes we’re talking about when it comes to dealing with global warming. And we can do more. Now there’s so much that I have to do as president with the cap-and-trade system, with moving away from our dependence on foreign oil, but I’m going to look for ways that will cushion the costs on middle class and working and poor people.

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: 2008 Democratic Compassion Forum at Messiah College

Barack Obama on Environment : Apr 13, 2008
Genesis teaches stewardship of earth: sacrifice for future

Q: Could you give an example of how you relate your faith to science policy?

A: One of the things I draw from the Genesis story is the importance of us being good stewards of the land, of this incredible gift. And I think there have been times where we haven’t been [good stewards], and this is one of those times where we’ve got to take the warning seriously [about climate change]. And part of what my religious faith teaches me is to take an intergenerational view, to recognize that we are borrowing this planet from our children and our grandchildren. And this is where religious faith and the science of global warming converge: We have to find resources in ourselves to make sacrifices so we don’t leave it to the next generation. We’ve got to be less wasteful, both as a society and in our own individual lives. I think religion can actually bolster our desire to make those sacrifices now. As president, I hope to rally the entire world around the importance of us being good stewards of the land.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2008 Democratic Compassion Forum at Messiah College

Rick Perry on Energy & Oil : Feb 12, 2008
Manmade global warming: "It's-All-Our-Fault" theory

You can't have rational discussions with the left about nature versus nurture or global warming because they claim science has already weighed in. Yet, science reveals new discoveries all the time. Here we are again at a well-worn crossroads: The left advocates tolerance while crushing dissenting views.

When it comes to manmade global warming, many scientists who once advocated it is caused by human activity have abandoned that theory after closer study. Where are the stories on this growing SCIENTIFIC movement? Alas, many in the news media have already invested too much in a particular storyline, just as some scientists continue promoting It's-All-Our-Fault theory because their research grants are dependent on it. In 25 years, when this theory has been discarded alongside other ideas that didn't stand the test of time, perhaps there will be a one-day story announcing its demise. Then the left will be on to its next theory created to advance a particular political agenda.

Click for Rick Perry on other issues.   Source: On My Honor, by Gov. Rick Perry, p.185-186

Mike Bloomberg on Energy & Oil : Feb 11, 2008
Cities are taking the lead on climate change

Serious carbon targets will not hamper growth, and it will leave us all better off. If the US and the developing nations make such commitments, then the prospects for a new international global warming accord improve greatly. The world cannot wait for 2009. Global warming demands immediate action. The world’s great cities recognize that. Leaders in local governments around the globe are already moving aggressively and creatively to fight climate change.

It’s why, even though our national government has yet to approve the Kyoto Protocol, more than 700 cities in the US, representing more than 80 million Americans, have pledged to meet its goals. And it’s why, later this year, NYC will convene a 2-day conference of representatives from more than 20 major world cities. It will feature experts in such fields as transportation, city planning, public health; and it will address the challenges that the world’s cities share in reducing urban air pollution and curbing climate change.

Click for Mike Bloomberg on other issues.   Source: Speech to the United Nations on tropical hardwoods

Mike Bloomberg on Energy & Oil : Feb 11, 2008
US must set real and binding carbon reduction targets

The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in Bali, which was my privilege to address, was an historic gathering. It set the stage for a global compact that advances the progress begun some 10 years ago at Kyoto.

However, between now and the Copenhagen Conference next year, we must establish, I think, the preconditions for such progress. Both developed and developing nations must recognize the need to alter their policies and make serious commitments to change. And I believe that our experience in New York City, and the experience of many of the world’s other great cities, too, can help guide that process.

The first precondition for making the Copenhagen negotiations a success, I believe, is that the US, which leads the world in greenhouse gas production, must finally set real and binding carbon reduction targets. And I believe the American people are prepared to accept our responsibility to lead by example.

Click for Mike Bloomberg on other issues.   Source: Speech to the United Nations on tropical hardwoods

Mitt Romney on Energy & Oil : Jan 13, 2008
Need worldwide global warming solutions; not CAFE or US tax

Q: What about the domestic auto industry?

A: Look at Washington. They gave it CAFE standards, which hurt. Some Senators are talking about a new form of tax on energy in this country, which would make it even harder on the domestic companies.

Q: Well, their point is that you have got to do something about global warming. Isn’t that your understanding?

A: Oh, sure. And there’s nothing wrong with dealing with global warming. But there is a big difference between talking about global warming, which requires global solutions, and the idea of America warming. No one talks about America warming. If we’re going to have solutions that deal, for instance, with a cap in trade program or a BTU tax or anything of that nature, it has to be global in its sweep. But Sen. McCain’s proposition is that we do this as America only. A unilateral effort would only cause higher costs here, and give the advantage to nations that already have a substantial cost advantage.

Click for Mitt Romney on other issues.   Source: CNN Late Edition: 2008 presidential series with Wolf Blitzer

Hillary Clinton on Environment : Dec 13, 2007
Advocate a cap and trade system

I advocate a cap and trade system. What the auction of pollution permits is taking that money and invest in new technologies, new ways of getting to our objectives that I’ve outline inside my energy plan. I want to use some of it to cushion the costs tha will come on to the US consumer. It’s not just enough to tackle global warming, we’ve got to enlist the help of the next generation. My fifth grade teacher said it was to study math and science, but it gave me an idea of contributing to my country.
Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: 2007 Des Moines Register Democratic Debate

Hillary Clinton on Foreign Policy : Dec 13, 2007
Establish leadership & moral authority via multilateralism

Q: When future historians write of your administration’s foreign policy pursuits, what will be noted as your doctrine and the vision you cast for U.S. diplomatic relations?

A: It will be a doctrine of restoring America’s leadership and moral authority through multilateral organizations, through attempts to come to agreements on issues ranging from global warming to stopping the proliferation of nuclear weapons and other dangerous weapons. It will be a doctrine that demonstrates that the United States is not afraid to cooperate; that through cooperation in our interdependent world, we actually can build a stronger country and a stronger world that will be more reflective of our values.

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: 2007 Des Moines Register Democratic debate

Mitt Romney on Energy & Oil : Dec 12, 2007
Invest in new technologies to get us off of foreign oil

Confronting climate change is going to help our economy because we’re going to invest in new technologies to get ourselves off of foreign oil, and as we get ourselves off of foreign oil, we also dramatically reduce our CO2 emissions. That’s good for the environment; it’s also good for our economy. Because $300 to $400 billion worth of oil a year from other people who use it against us, that’s bad for our economy, it’s also bad for the environment. We can do these things in a way that help both the environment and the economy and national security. Is global warming an issue for the world? Absolutely. Is it something we can deal with by becoming energy independent and energy secure? We sure can. At the same time, we call it global warming, not America warming. So let’s not put a burden on us alone and have the rest of the world skate by without having to participate in this effort. It’s a global effort, but our independence is something we can do unilaterally.
Click for Mitt Romney on other issues.   Source: 2007 Des Moines Register Republican Debate

Barack Obama on Energy & Oil : Dec 4, 2007
Aggressively address accelerating climate change

Q: What do you think the toughest choice you have left to make is? What haven’t you made up your mind on yet? And why haven’t you?

A: The issue of climate change. I’ve put forward one of the most aggressive proposals out there, but the science seems to be coming in indicating it’s accelerating even more quickly with every passing day. And by the time I take office, I think we’re going to have to have a serious conversation about how drastic steps we need to take to address it.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2007 Democratic radio debate on NPR

Jon Huntsman on Energy & Oil : Nov 16, 2007
Congress should cap greenhouse-gas pollution

Huntsman appeared in a new TV ad urging Congress to act on climate change. The commercial, sponsored by the conservation group Environmental Defense, says states have taken action to help reduce pollution that leads to global warming.

Huntsman appears in the 30-second commercial along with Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger (R-CA), and Gov. Brian Schweitzer (D-MT), who take turns finishing each other's statements:

Huntsman's office issued a statement: "We are already wrestling with the critical issue of greenhouse-gas emissions. This ad is an effort to encourage congressional action, which is imperative to a nationwide, comprehensive approach to clean our air and create new economic-development opportunities for our state and nation."
Click for Jon Huntsman on other issues.   Source: The Salt Lake Tribune, "Huntsman appears in climate ad"

Joe Biden on Energy & Oil : Nov 11, 2007
Supports cap-and-trade for greenhouse gases

On climate change Biden occupies what has become the conventional liberal middle-ground, supporting “a ‘cap-and-trade’ approach to regulating emissions and investment in technologies” to reduce greenhouse gasses.
Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: The Contenders, by Laura Flanders, p.180

Mike Bloomberg on Energy & Oil : Nov 2, 2007
While greenhouse gas pollution is free, it will be abundant

We have to stop ignoring the laws of economics. As long as greenhouse gas pollution is free, it will be abundant. If we want to reduce it, there has to be a cost for producing it. The voluntary targets suggested by Pres. Bush would be like voluntary speed limits--doomed to fail. If we’re serious about climate change, the question is not whether we should put a value on greenhouse gas pollution, but how we should do it. [I prefer a direct charge over cap-and-trade].
Click for Mike Bloomberg on other issues.   Source: Keynote Address to the US Conference of Mayors

Mike Bloomberg on Energy & Oil : Nov 2, 2007
PlaNYC: convert 13,000 taxis to hybrids or high-efficiency

I think illegal guns and climate change are two of the best examples of cities leading where Washington has not. On both issues, those in Washington prefer talk to action. The Second Amendment [is used as] a political duck-and-cover that allows legislators to escape responsibility for fixing a serious problem.

On climate change, the duck-and-cover usually involves pointing the finger at others. It’s China-this & India-that. But wait a second. This is the United States of America. When there’s a major challenge, we don’t wait for others to act. We lead. And we lead by example. That’s what all of us here are doing.

When we developed our long-term sustainability plan in NYC, which we call PlaNYC, we made no apologies for stealing the very best ideas--and we came up with some of our own, including converting our 13,000 taxis to hybrids or high-efficiency vehicles. This will not only help clean our air and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, it will save each driver about $4,500 a year in gas costs

Click for Mike Bloomberg on other issues.   Source: Keynote Address to the US Conference of Mayors

Mike Bloomberg on Energy & Oil : Nov 2, 2007
Direct charge over cap-and-trade, to raise cost of carbon

If we’re serious about climate change, the question is not whether we should put a value on greenhouse gas pollution, but how we should do it. To raise the cost of carbon, we can take either an indirect approach--creating a cap-and-trade system of pollution credits--or a direct approach: charging a fee for greenhouse gas pollutants.

Cap-and-trade is an easier political sell because the costs are hidden--but they’re still there. There are also logistical issues: The market for trading carbon credits will be much more difficult to police than the market for the sulfur dioxide credits that greatly reduced acid rain.

A direct charge would eliminate the uncertainty that companies would face in a cap-and-trade system. It would be easier to implement and enforce, it would prevent special interests from opening up loopholes, & it would create an opportunity to cut taxes.

Click for Mike Bloomberg on other issues.   Source: Keynote Address to the US Conference of Mayors

Hillary Clinton on Energy & Oil : Sep 4, 2007
Led delegation, with McCain, to see effects of polar warming

Virtually the entire Senate voted for a resolution opposing the Kyoto Climate Change Treaty even before I could submit it for ratification.

All that changed after 9/11 and the Iraqi War. With oil prices soaring and mounting evidence of the destructive impacts of climate change, everyone began to take the issue more seriously. Sen. John McCain and Hillary led delegations of more skeptical senators to northern Norway and Alaska to see the already clear impact of warming for themselves. Other countries proved that clean efficient energy use could be profitable. While the US government was condemning Kyoto as a threat to growth, the United Kingdom determined to beat its Kyoto reduction target by 25% to 50%, and in so doing created enough good jobs to enjoy something we Americans didn't--rising wages and declining inequality. Germany is now the number one producer of wind energy, and Japan leads the world in the production and installation of solar panels.

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: Giving, by Bill Clinton, p.154-155

Mitt Romney on Energy & Oil : Aug 31, 2007
Exporting carbon emissions to China hurts US and planet

On Global Warming: “I want to make sure we don’t do something which costs hundreds of billions of dollars in this country and makes us less competitive with China and India. If carbon-emitting manufacturing moves to other countries, we’ve done nothing for the planet and we’ve hurt ourselves immeasurably.
Click for Mitt Romney on other issues.   Source: The Man, His Values, & His Vision, p.113

Barack Obama on Foreign Policy : Aug 26, 2007
Strengthen NATO to face 21st-century threats

Barack Obama will restore America’s leadership abroad, reform and enhance international organizations and strengthen our alliances. He will strengthen NATO to face 21st-century threats, forge a new and lasting framework for collective security in Asia, and work with other countries around the world to combat global climate change.
Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2008 Presidential campaign website, BarackObama.com “Flyers”

Mike Bloomberg on Energy & Oil : Jun 18, 2007
Reduce NYC carbon emissions by 30% by 2030

An increasing number of people on both sides of the aisle now recognize a major problem: global warming. The science is undeniable and more than any other issue, climate change highlights the need for long-term plans that begin tackling the causes of the problem now.

In New York, we’ve laid out our own detailed plans for reducing carbon emissions by 30% by 2030, investing in more clean energy sources and creating a truly sustainable 21st century city. And we’re going to hold ourselves accountable for meeting interim goals.

Anybody can set goals for 2050 or 2070--but we’ll never reach them unless we start taking real action now. That’s what California and New York are doing, along with many other cities and states. But the federal legislators, as usual, are way behind the curve--laughably setting goals for some far off time when they’ll all be dead and can’t be held accountable!

Click for Mike Bloomberg on other issues.   Source: Speech at “Ceasefire! Bridging The Political Divide” meeting

Hillary Clinton on Energy & Oil : Jun 8, 2007
Extensive funding into alternative energy

At a Sept. 2005 global warming conference, Hillary told the audience there had been an “absence of leadership” by the Bush administration on climate change. She offered her own solution: “I would advocate a much more concerted effort on our government’s part to fund an extensive research project into alternative forms of energy.”

The next day there was a plenary session on global warming. The marquee attraction was Al Gore. Hillary and Gore had vied for Bill’s attention during his presidency, and that rivalry had only intensified after the Clintons left the White House. Bill privately told confidants that he believed that if Hillary emerged as the likely Democratic presidential nominee, Gore would enter as a left-of-Hillary alternative.

One month later, Hillary unveiled a comprehensive clean-energy plan, along the lines she had mentioned at the conference. She suffered the same fate as Gore: Nobody paid attention.

Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: Her Way, by Jeff Gerth & Don Van Natta, p.276-277

Mitt Romney on Energy & Oil : Jun 3, 2007
No-regrets policy: biofuel, nuclear power, drill ANWR

Q: Is science wrong on global warming? And what, if any, steps would you take as president to address the issue of climate change?

GIULIANI: I think we have to accept the view that scientists have that there is global warming and that humans contribute to that. It’s frustrating and really dangerous for us to see money going to our enemies because we have to buy oil from certain countries. We should be supporting all the alternatives. We need a project similar to putting a man on the moon.

ROMNEY: Rudy Giuliani is right in terms of an Apollo project to get us energy independent, and the effects of that on global warming are positive. It’s a no-regrets policy. It’s a great idea. [We need,] as a strategic imperative, energy independence for America. And it takes that Apollo project. It also takes biodiesel, biofuel, cellulosic ethanol, nuclear power, more drilling in ANWR. We have to be serious also about efficiency and that’s going to allow us to become energy independent.

Click for Mitt Romney on other issues.   Source: 2007 GOP debate at Saint Anselm College

Mike Huckabee on Environment : May 3, 2007
Follow Boy Scout rule: leave earth better than we found it

Q: Thousands of reputable scientists have concluded with almost certainly that human activity is responsible for the warming of the Earth. Do you believe global warming exists?

A: The most important thing about global warming is this. Whether humans are responsible for the bulk of climate change is going to be left to the scientists, but it’s all of our responsibility to leave this planet in better shape for the future generations than we found it. It’s the old Boy Scout rule of the campsite: You leave the campsite in better shape than you found it. I believe that even our responsibility to God means that we have to be good stewards of this Earth, be good caretakers of the natural resources that don’t belong to us, we just get to use them. We have no right to abuse them.

Click for Mike Huckabee on other issues.   Source: 2007 GOP primary debate, at Reagan library, hosted by MSNBC

Joe Biden on Energy & Oil : Apr 26, 2007
Make every automobile sold be a flex-fuel automobile

We have to make an equivalent of a Manhattan Project [on energy & climate change]. We have to fundamentally shift the way we do it. Barack and I have a bill to make sure that every automobile sold in the US is a flex-fuel automobile; every gas station in America, by the year 2009, has to have 10% of it’s pumps pumping E85 ethanol.

We also have legislation in requiring we invest $100 million a year for the next couple of years in order to be able to find lithium battery technology to be able to power our cars.

We also have legislation talking about capping emissions. Cap them now; not wait. Cap them where they are now. Time’s running out.

But you have to be willing to make multi-billion dollar investments over the next 10 years and set hard goals in order to be able to get to the point where we are no longer dependent.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: 2007 South Carolina Democratic primary debate, on MSNBC

Barack Obama on Principles & Values : Feb 15, 2007
Replace partisan bickering with politics of hope

Obama called for universal health care, energy independence, an effective policy to stem global warming, and an end to loud and uncivil, Rush-Limbaugh-like public discourse. “We have come to be consumed by a 24-hour, slash-and-burn, negative-ad, bickering, small-minded politics that does not move us forward,” he said in Portsmouth, aiming his critique at both Republicans and his own party as they glowered across a gaping, ever-widening partisan gulf. “Sometimes one side is up, and the other side is down. But there is not sense that they are coming together in a common-sense, practical, nonideological way to solve the problems that we face.”
Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Hopes and Dreams, by Steve Dougherty, p. 17-18

Martin O`Malley on Environment : Jan 31, 2007
Adopt the Clean Cars Act to fight global warming

We should accept our responsibility in the fight against global warming by supporting stricter pollution emission standards for cars sold in Maryland by adopting the Clean Cars Act. By taking action, we are not only going to be able to help children who suffer everyday from asthma, we are also going to be able to remove pollutants from the air, and be able, to a degree, to remove those pollutants from the Bay. We can join 11 other states in getting this done, and getting it done this year.
Click for Martin O`Malley on other issues.   Source: 2007 State of the State Address

Mike Huckabee on Energy & Oil : Jan 4, 2007
Kyoto was a mistake, but “Earth in the Balance” is not

You do not have to hug a tree to appreciate one. It would have been a mistake to sign the Kyoto Treaty since it would have given foreign nations the power to impose standards on us. But Al Gore was not entirely wrong when he spoke of earth “in the balance.” Balance is exactly what we need more of in this discussion. All of us need to have a healthy respect for our resources, a responsible level of use of those resources, and a comprehensive plan for either preserving or renewing those resources.
Click for Mike Huckabee on other issues.   Source: From Hope to Higher Ground, by Mike Huckabee, p. 70

Sarah Palin on Energy & Oil : Oct 22, 2006
Analyze potential costs associated with climate change

Q: What role does state government have, if any, in addressing global warming and climate change?

A: We need to analyze the potential economic costs, needs and opportunities associated with climate change. Let’s be cautious in how we react--to make sure we don’t overreact. The Alaska Climate Impact Assessment Commission is supposed to assess the situation and issue a report on March 1, 2007. This is a good start.

Click for Sarah Palin on other issues.   Source: Anchorage Daily News: 2006 gubernatorial candidate profile

Barack Obama on Energy & Oil : Oct 1, 2006
We cannot drill our way out of our addiction to oil

It is hard to overstate the degree to which our addiction to oil undermines our future. Without any change to energy policy, US demand for oil will jump 40% in 20 years. Over the same period, worldwide demand will jump 30%.

A large portion of the $800 million we spend on foreign oil every day goes to some of the world’s most volatile regimes. And there are the environmental consequences. Just about every scientist outside the White House believes climate change is real.

We cannot drill our way out of the problem. Instead of subsidizing the oil industry, we should end every single tax break the industry currently receives and demand that 1% of the revenues from oil companies with over $1 billion in quarterly profits go toward financing alternative energy research and infrastructure.

Over the last 30 years, countries like Brazil have used a mix of regulation and direct government investment to develop a biofuel industry; 70% of its new vehicles run on sugar-based ethanol.

Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: The Audacity of Hope, by Barack Obama, p.167-169

Condoleezza Rice on Energy & Oil : Feb 17, 2005
Bring to market transformational energy technologies

Addressing climate change requires a sustained effort by all nations over many generations. Developing & bringing to the marketplace transformational energy technologies will be key. To this end, the US has launched 5 important multilateral partnerships:
  1. The International Methane to Markets Partnership
  2. The International Partnership for a Hydrogen Economy
  3. The Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum
  4. The Generation IV International Forum
  5. The Global Earth Observation initiative.
Click for Condoleezza Rice on other issues.   Source: Congressional testimony, on www.4condi.com, “Issues”

Andrew Cuomo on Energy & Oil : Oct 14, 2003
Repower old power plants to increase efficiency

Greenhouse gas emissions--principally CO2--have accelerated a global warming trend that threatens our agricultural and tourism industries and produces harmful health effects.

The truth is that technology has provided several ways to increase our energy supply dramatically while preserving our environment. In New York State, for example, many older power plants remain in operation despite their inefficiency and resultant polluting. A process known as "repowering" is available to retrofit these plants with new technologies that boost power production while cutting emissions dramatically. Unfortunately, neither states nor the federal government have provided support for repowering by private-sector energy companies during this credit crunch.

To address this problem, our federal and state governments should provide tax credits to existing power plants to offset the costs of repowering older, less efficient power plants with newer, cleaner, more efficient technology.

Click for Andrew Cuomo on other issues.   Source: Crossroads, by Andrew Cuomo, p. 75-76

Hillary Clinton on Energy & Oil : Sep 9, 2000
Ratify Kyoto; more mass transit

As Senator, I will work for New York to get its fair share of federal mass transit funds and to increase the amount of money that goes to transit funds. And, I will vote to ratify the Kyoto Protocol to bring all nations together to address global warming and build a better future for us all.
Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: www.hillary2000.org, “Environment”

  • Additional quotations related to Global Warming issues can be found under Energy & Oil.
  • Click here for definitions & background information on Energy & Oil.
Candidates on Energy & Oil:
Incumbents:
Pres.Barack Obama
V.P.Joe Biden
Secy.John Kerry
Secy.Chuck Hagel

 Related issues:
Alternative Energy
Energy Independence
Natural Resources
Nuclear Energy & Weapons

2016 Presidential contenders:
Mayor Michael Bloomberg(I-NYC)
Amb.John Bolton(R-MD)
Gov.Jeb Bush(R-FL)
Dr.Ben Carson(T-MD)
Gov.Chris Christie(R-NJ)
Secy.Hillary Clinton(D-NY)
Sen.Ted Cruz(T-TX)
Gov.Andrew Cuomo(D-NY)
Mayor Rahm Emanuel(D-IL)
Gov.Bobby Jindal(R-LA)
Gov.Nikk Haley(R-SC)
Rep.Peter King(R-NY)
Gov.Martin O`Malley(D-MD)
Gov.Deval Patrick(D-MA)
Sen.Rand Paul(R-KY)
Sen.Rob Portman(R-OH)
Sen.Marco Rubio(R-FL)
Gov.Jesse Ventura(I-MN)
2012 Presidential:
Rep.Michele Bachmann(T-MN)
Rep.Newt Gingrich(R-GA)
Gov.Mike Huckabee(R-AR)
Gov.Jon Huntsman(R-UT)
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Gov.Sarah Palin(R-AK)
Rep.Ron Paul(R-TX)
Gov.Rick Perry(R-TX)
Gov.Mitt Romney(R-MA)
Rep.Paul Ryan(R-WI)
Sen.Rick Santorum(R-PA)
Donald Trump(I-NY)
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Page last updated: Oct 02, 2014