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Paul Simon on Foreign Policy


Great nations should commit more abroad

People and nations do not follow weak leaders. Sounding an uncertain trumpet on political and economic matters does not galvanize or inspire followers. The economic reasons can be boiled down to one phrase: failure to address our financial problems-particularly our budget deficit. To lead the world toward greater stability and away from the threats of war, the US must show both political and economic strength.
Source: The Dollar Crisis, p. 48-49 Jul 2, 1996

Great nations should commit more abroad

of our national income that goes for foreign economic assistance.
  • We have asked other nations to contribute troops to United Nations peacekeeping efforts, but we have contributed few ourselves. (Jordan and Nepal are ahead of us!)The economic reasons can be boiled down to one phrase: failure to address our financial problems-particularly our budget deficit. To lead the world toward greater stability and away from the threats of war, the US must show both political and economic strength.
    Source: The Dollar Crisis, p. 48-49 Jul 2, 1996

    Pay attention to developing nations

    40% of our exports are sent to lesser-developed countries. For both economic and political reasons, we should be paying more attention to these nations. The political reason is that the great threat to the world is no longer nuclear annihilation but instability that can spill over from one nation to many nations. One way of encouraging stability is to meet the needs and hopes of people without violence. (The same is true within our own nation.) Trade is a way of helping to do that. Foreign aid is another. After being the world leader, the US now spends less as a percentage of its income on foreign economic assistance than any of he Western European nations or Japan. We spend less than 1% of our federal budget on foreign aid. Paying attention to the developing nations and their markets that will grow rapidly in the decades ahead is good for our economy and good for world stability.
    Source: The Dollar Crisis, p.107-108 Jul 2, 1996

    Pay attention to developing nations

    another. After being the world leader, the US now spends less as a percentage of its income on foreign economic assistance than any of he Western European nations or Japan. We spend less than 1% of our federal budget on foreign aid. Paying attention to the developing nations and their markets that will grow rapidly in the decades ahead is good for our economy and good for world stability.
    Source: The Dollar Crisis, p.107-108 Jul 2, 1996

    Voted NO on Strengthening of the trade embargo against Cuba.

    Strengthening of the trade embargo against Cuba.
    Status: Conf Rpt Agreed to Y)74; N)22; NV)4
    Reference: Conference Report on H.R. 927; Bill H.R. 927 ; vote number 1996-22 on Mar 5, 1996

    Voted YES on ending Vietnam embargo.

    Ending U.S. trade embargos on the country of Vietnam.
    Status: Amdt Agreed to Y)62; N)38
    Reference: For. Reltns. Auth. Act FY 94 & 95; Bill S. 1281 ; vote number 1994-5 on Jan 27, 1994

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