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Paul Simon on Free Trade


Get other nations to lower import barriers

Tariffs are usually perceived as the major barrier to products moving from one nation to another. Where tariff barriers exist, the rates should be roughly equivalent. Where the rates are not equivalent, we should push for it.

While tariff barriers can be significant impediments to free trade, non-tariff barriers can prove to be equally or more troublesome. For example, some of our Asian trading partners cause endless delays in approving US-made products. In some cases, they virtually ban our products.

Source: The Dollar Crisis, p.104-105 Jul 2, 1996

Trade deficit is as bad as budget deficit

It is probably no coincidence that the beginning of the period of sustained trade deficits began in 1975-the same year that the budget deficits increased to a then-record high of $53 billion. By 1995, the accumulated trade deficit totaled approximately $1.1 trillion. This number is analogous to our national debt of $4.9 trillion. Like the national debt, the accumulated trade deficit will have to be paid, either by a lower standard of living or increased productivity and sales.
Source: The Dollar Crisis, p. 97 & 102-111 Jul 2, 1996

Trade deficit is as bad as budget deficit

will bring us closer to eliminating the trade deficit. [Some other things are]:
  • Train our workforce better.
  • Build quality into our products.
  • Bring more long-term professionalism to our trade negotiations.
  • Persuade other nations to remove non-tariff barriers.
  • Become more sensitive to other cultures.
  • Pay attention to developing nations. Analyze our potential on an industry-by-industry basis.
  • Stop blaming foreigners for our troubles.
  • Examine new tax policies, like a VAT.
    Source: The Dollar Crisis, p. 97 & 102-111 Jul 2, 1996

    Trade deficit improves if we understand foreign culture

    The Japanese, as do the British, drive on the left-hand side of the road. Therefore, for automobiles sold in Japan, the Japanese automakers build cars with the steering wheels on the right-hand side of the car. However, on automobiles bound for the US, they place the steering wheel on the left-hand side. It would seem that US automakers would reciprocate by building automobiles with right-hand steering for Japanese and British markets. But they donít!

    And we handicap ourselves by persisting in using the English units of measure for most of our manufacturing processes, when almost every other industrialized nation has adopted the metric system.

    Consider, too, that in many nations, people are accustomed to buying food products in smaller packages and quantities than we use. Sellers must learn to adapt to different markets. We must become more understanding of the cultures and buying habits of others.

    Source: The Dollar Crisis, p.105-106 Jul 2, 1996

    Trade deficit improves if we understand foreign culture

    in using the English units of measure for most of our manufacturing processes, when almost every other industrialized nation has adopted the metric system.

    Consider, too, that in many nations, people are accustomed to buying food products in smaller packages and quantities than we use. Sellers must learn to adapt to different markets. We must become more understanding of the cultures and buying habits of others.

    Source: The Dollar Crisis, p.105-106 Jul 2, 1996

    Voted YES on imposing trade sanctions on Japan for closed market.

    Resolution supporting sanctions on Japanese products if car parts markets don't open up; and seeking sharp reductions in the trade imbalances in car sales and parts through elimination of restrictive Japanese market-closing practices.
    Bill S Res 118 ; vote number 1995-158 on May 9, 1995

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