Search for...
Follow @ontheissuesorg
OnTheIssuesLogo

Bill Bradley on Technology

2000 Democratic Primary Challenger for President


Internet gives people control over political information

Television’s dominance of political communication is far from over, even though the Internet is beginning to play a larger role in politics. Unlike TV, the Internet isn’t exclusive; in the 2000 presidential campaign, my web site didn’t push aside anyone else’s [like TV ads would]. Web sites are also interactive. Most important, the Internet provides as much or as little information as a citizen needs; people who came to my web site could look at a 30-second video clip if that’s all they wanted, or they could read my speeches and press releases. Unlike broadcast media, the Internet gives people a measure of control over what they take in. With e-mail, a campaign can tailor information to the voter’s interest and provide regular updates. And it can do all these things at very little cost: After building and updating the web site, communicating the information to millions of people is virtually free. Once we bridge the digital divide, the Internet becomes a truly democratic tool for everyone.
Source: The Journey From Here, by Bill Bradley, p. 92 , Sep 9, 2000

We gave away spectrum; give back free campaign air time

Another way to reduce the role of money in politics is offering free airtime. TV networks have been granted one of the most valuable public trusts in the history of our nation-the right to use, for private gain, the public airwaves. Congress just gave broadcasters-gave, not auctioned off-a large portion of the new digital spectrum, which will be used in high-definition TV. This is a public trust we’ve handed them, and with a public trust like that comes public obligations.
Source: The Journey From Here, by Bill Bradley, p. 91 , Aug 15, 2000

Internet gives people control over political information

Web sites are interactive-you can talk both to candidates and to your neighbors. The Internet provides as much or as little information as a citizen needs. Unlike broadcast media, the Internet gives people a measure of control over what they take in. With e-mail, a campaign can tailor information to the voter’s interest and provide regular updates. After building and updating the Web site, communicating the information to millions of people is virtually free.
Source: The Journey From Here, by Bill Bradley, p. 92 , Aug 15, 2000

Govt encryption standards will protect Internet privacy

Q: Should the government regulate the Internet?
A: I think the government should play a role, but a small role. It’s an emerging technology. The Internet is going in directions that we don’t know. I think that trying to set a standard for encryption is very important, because the most important thing that could prevent the growth of the Internet is if people felt their privacy could be invaded.
Source: Democrat debate in Los Angeles , Mar 1, 2000

Close digital divide with teachers and “infostamp” vouchers

Q: How would you insure that minority communities gain access to technology? A: First, I would give 10,000 scholarships a year to people who would teach in an urban or rural school district in the areas of computer science, math, science or foreign languages. The next thing I would do is something I call “infostamps” which empowers people to acquire the equipment they need to be a part of the digital revolution. We have food stamps. We need infostamps to be able to accomplish this objective.
Source: Democrat debate in Harlem, NYC , Feb 21, 2000

Improve schools to remedy “digital divide”

The computer and the internet are ushering us into the age of the democratization of knowledge. But. the digital divide is real. To remedy that, we must radically improve our education system, for that is and always has been the engine of growth and change in our society. And we must create opportunities for life-long learning-not just to mold a person for a job but to mold a citizen who has the capacities and abilities to improve our democracy itself. We can’t afford to leave anyone behind.
Source: NYTimes.com, “In His Own Words” , Jan 4, 2000

Cautious moratorium on Internet sales taxes

Bradley supports the current moratorium on Internet sales taxes, but is wary of ceding a source of government revenue beyond that. Bradley recently hinted at support for an extension of the ban, but refused to endorse a “permanent” one.
Source: Newsweek, p. 31 , Dec 20, 1999

Supports research, but no bold step to Mars

Q: Are you willing to take a bold step and leave us with a legacy of having a man on Mars by 2010? A: I will not set a target to get to Mars by any particular date. I will not do that because I haven’t been convinced that we can do so in a period of time. I think investment in space is important, because of the research. I will continue to make an investment in space. I think we need research in all areas of our national government.
Source: Town Hall Meeting, Nashua NH , Dec 18, 1999

Television time is not the exclusive property of the rich

Q: Are you in favor of free and equal TV time for all candidates?

A: Yes. I’m in favor of abolishing soft money, and I support public financing of elections and free television time for candidates in the last six weeks of a campaign. The public airwaves belong to all of us. There’s a responsibility on the part of networks to facilitate open public discussions.

Source: Joint interview with Bradley & McCain , Dec 16, 1999

Internet connects politicians to voters

The Internet is special [in politics] for three reasons. First, it makes the politician be much more of who he or she is. When you do a chat on a website, you don’t know who’s listening. So you don’t have a recourse to any kind of marketing. You just have to be yourself. Second, the Internet gives voters a chance to really understand issues in depth. Third, it is a chance to invite people to participate in a serious debate about their futures in a way that makes a real difference.
Source: www.billbradley.com/ “On the Internet” 5/19/99 , May 19, 1999

For deregulation; consumer rights; limit media ownership

Source: Project Vote Smart -- Voting Record , Jun 15, 1995

Voted for V-Chip & telecomm self-censorship

Source: Project Vote Smart -- Voting Record , Jun 14, 1995

Voted YES on telecomm deregulation.

Deregulation of the telecommunications industry.
Status: Telecommunications Competition and Deregulation Act of 1995 Y)91; N)5; NV)3
Reference: Conference Report on S. 625, the; Bill S. 652 ; vote number 1996-8 on Feb 1, 1996

  • Click here for definitions & background information on Technology.
  • Click here for VoteMatch responses by Bill Bradley.
  • Click here for AmericansElect.org quiz by Bill Bradley.
Other candidates on Technology: Bill Bradley on other issues:
Former Presidents:
George W. Bush (R,2001-2009)
Bill Clinton (D,1993-2001)
George Bush Sr. (R,1989-1993)
Ronald Reagan (R,1981-1989)
Jimmy Carter (D,1977-1981)
Gerald Ford (R,1974-1977)
Richard Nixon (R,1969-1974)
Lyndon Johnson (D,1963-1969)
John F. Kennedy (D,1961-1963)

Former Contenders:
V.P.Al Gore
Pat Buchanan
V.P.Dick Cheney
Sen.Bob Dole
Ralph Nader
Gov.Sarah Palin

Political Thinkers:
Noam Chomsky
Milton Friedman
Arianna Huffington
Rush Limbaugh
Tea Party
Ayn Rand
Secy.Robert Reich
Donald Trump
Gov.Jesse Ventura
Abortion
Budget/Economy
Civil Rights
Corporations
Crime
Drugs
Education
Energy/Oil
Environment
Families/Children
Foreign Policy
Free Trade
Govt. Reform
Gun Control
Health Care
Homeland Security
Immigration
Infrastructure/Technology
Jobs
Principles/Values
Social Security
Tax Reform
War/Iraq/Mideast
Welfare/Poverty

Page last updated: Oct 08, 2013