issues2000

Topics in the News: Armed Forces Personnel


Donald Trump on Homeland Security : Aug 28, 2020
FactCheck: Obama signed Veterans Choice, not Trump

Trump falsely claimed he passed the Veterans Choice program. The Veterans Choice bill, a bipartisan initiative led by Sens. Bernie Sanders and the late John McCain was signed into law by President Barack Obama in 2014.

In 2018, Trump signed the VA Mission Act, which expanded and changed the Choice program. Trump has told this lie more than 150 times.

Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: CNN Fact-Check on 2020 Republican Convention speech

Donald Trump on War & Peace : Aug 28, 2020
Unlike predecessors, I have kept America OUT of new wars

Unlike previous administrations, I have kept America OUT of new wars -- and our troops are coming home. We have spent nearly $2.5 trillion on completely rebuilding our military, which was very badly depleted when I took office. This includes three separate pay raises for our great warriors. We also launched the Space Force, the first new branch of the United States military since the Air Force was created almost 75 years ago.
Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Speech at 2020 Republican National Convention

Mike Pence on Homeland Security : Aug 26, 2020
Fact Check: Takes credit for Veterans Choice passed in 2014

Pence said: "After years of scandal that robbed our veterans of the care that you earned in the uniform of the United States, President Trump kept his word again. We reformed the VA, and Veterans Choice is now available for every veteran in America."

The Veterans Choice program was a bipartisan initiative enacted by Obama in 2014. The Trump administration "reformed the VA" by signing the VA MISSION Act of 2018, which boosted funding for the choice program and expanded the eligibility criteria.

Click for Mike Pence on other issues.   Source: NBC News Fact-Check on 2020 Republican Convention speech

Joe Biden on Homeland Security : Aug 21, 2020
Don't turn a blind eye to Russian bounties on US soldiers

One of Trump's more recent foreign policy scandals was the suggestion that Russia had been paying bounties to Taliban fighters in Afghanistan for dead U.S. troops, which is believed to be linked to several American deaths in Afghanistan. "Under President Biden, America will not turn a blind eye to Russian bounties on the heads of American soldiers," the former vice president said. "Nor will I put up with foreign interference in our most sacred democratic exercise: voting."
Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: D.Brennan/Newsweek on 2020 Democratic National Convention

Jo Jorgensen on War & Peace : Jul 26, 2020
Turn America into One Giant Switzerland: Armed and Neutral

Turn America into One Giant Switzerland: Armed and Neutral--with the military force to defend America's shores and soil against any foreign attackers or invaders. Protected by an armed citizenry and by a military laser-focused on defending America. No US involvement in foreign wars. Bring home our 200,000+ American military personnel stationed in foreign countries. No US military aid to foreign governments. No US blockades or embargoes of non-military trade. Peace.
Click for Jo Jorgensen on other issues.   Source: 2020 Presidential campaign website jo20.com

Mike Bloomberg on Homeland Security : Feb 25, 2020
We've stopped making weapons for the last war; good job

This is a dangerous world. And if we haven't learnt that after 9/11, I don't know what's going to teach us what to do. We have to do something, and I think the things that I've seen recently convinced me that the military today is better prepared than they have been in an awful long time, and that the monies they are spending on the war of weapons we need for the next war and not for the last, a common mistake that they're not making now.
Click for Mike Bloomberg on other issues.   Source: 10th Democratic Primary debate on eve of S.C. primary

Bernie Sanders on Homeland Security : Feb 8, 2020
FactCheck: $1.8 trillion on all military, not just weapons

In discussing his hope to galvanize international support to collectively combat climate change, Sanders inaccurately characterized a statistic on global military spending. "Here is my dream--maybe it's a radical dream," Sanders said. "But maybe, just maybe, given the crisis of climate change, the world can understand that instead of spending $1.8 trillion a year, collectively, on weapons of destruction, designed to kill each other, maybe we pool our resources and fight our common enemy, which is climate change."

That $1.8 trillion represents spending on more than just weapons. The figure is the 2018 total world military expenditure, as calculated by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. "Military expenditure" refers to all government spending on current military forces and activities, including salaries and benefits, operational expenses, arms and equipment purchases, military construction, research and development, and central administration, command and support.

Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: FactCheck.org on 8th Democrat 2020 primary debate

Tom Steyer on Homeland Security : Feb 7, 2020
Need to change world view from war to climate change

This view of the world, that our response should be military is driven by our gigantic military complex and ignores the biggest problem that we face, which is climate change. It can only be solved with diplomacy and allies. So in fact, what we are listening to is a discussion of 20 years of failed military action and how we should continue spending $700 billion dollars a year on defense when we spend $70 billion dollars a year at the federal level on education.
Click for Tom Steyer on other issues.   Source: 8th Democrat 2020 primary debate, St. Anselm College in NH

Bernie Sanders on Homeland Security : Feb 7, 2020
We spend $1.8T on collective military; spend it on climate

Here is my dream, maybe it's a radical dream, but maybe just may be given the crisis of climate change, the world can understand that instead of spending $1.8 trillion dollars a year collectively on weapons of destruction designed to kill each other, maybe we pool our resources and fight our common enemy, which is climate change.
Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: 8th Democrat 2020 primary debate, St. Anselm College in NH

Donald Trump on Homeland Security : Feb 4, 2020
$400B more from NATO members for military expenses

To safeguard American Liberty, we have invested a record-breaking $2.2 trillion in the United States Military. We have purchased the finest planes, missiles, rockets, ships, and every other form of military equipment--all made in the United States of America. We are also finally getting our allies to help pay their fair share. I have raised contributions from the other NATO members by more than $400 billion, and the number of allies meeting their minimum obligations has more than doubled.
Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: 2020 State of the Union address to Congress

Elizabeth Warren on Homeland Security : Jan 14, 2020
Fight to get military benefits, but cut defense budget

WARREN: The job of the commander-in-chief is to keep America safe. I think that's about judgment. It starts with knowing our military. I sit on the Senate Armed Services Committee. I work with military leaders, but I also visit our troops. I make sure they get their pay, the housing and medical benefits they've been promised. We have a problem with a revolving door between the defense industry and the Pentagon. We need to block that revolving door, and we need to cut our defense budget.

CEO Tom STEYER: It isn't so much about experience, it's about judgment. What we are hearing is 20 years of mistakes by the government in the Middle East. So the real question is judgment. If you look who had the judgment, it was a state senator from Illinois with no experience named Barack Obama who opposed the war. An outside perspective, looking at this and actually dealing with the problems as they are is what we're looking for now.

Click for Elizabeth Warren on other issues.   Source: 7th Democrat primary debate, on eve of Iowa caucus

Rocky De La Fuente on Homeland Security : Dec 31, 2019
Address broken VA hospital system

The Department of Veterans Affairs is broken. Some of our veterans are dying as they wait for care; others receive inferior treatment when they receive it. Yet, VA officials think it is appropriate to compare the "inconvenience" to "waiting in line at Di
Click for Rocky De La Fuente on other issues.   Source: Ballotpedia.org review of 2016 Florida Senate race

Tom Steyer on Homeland Security : Dec 24, 2019
Refocus and reduce U.S. military spending

Steyer criticizes Trump for losing the trust of military leadership, unnecessarily increasing Pentagon spending, and appointing "incompetent" officials in the Department of Veterans Affairs He backs an overall reduction in U.S. military spending, but says he will ensure the U.S. military is the "best-trained and best-equipped fighting force in the world." He argues that more defense spending should go toward emerging threats, including information warfare and climate change.
Click for Tom Steyer on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2019 Democratic primary

Mike Bloomberg on Homeland Security : Dec 24, 2019
Argued against increasing military spending

Bloomberg has taken few stances on defense issues, but he has argued against increasing military spending. As mayor, he pursued a range of initiatives to help veterans. He has argued that overall military spending is "about where it should be," and dismisses claims that significant Pentagon budget increases are needed to sustain military readiness. He says the focus should be on developing high-tech equipment and "an effective cyberwar service."

He advocates for a new congressional authorization for overseas military operations, many of which currently rely on two-decade-old legislation, to put them "on sound legal footing."

He points to his mayoral record on veterans' issues. His administration's programs included job placement and career assistance services, a veteran-run job center, and a joint program with the Department of Veterans Affairs to combat veteran homelessness in New York.

Click for Mike Bloomberg on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2019 Democratic primary

Pete Buttigieg on Homeland Security : Nov 20, 2019
Re-prioritize runaway growth in military spending

Q: Would you cut military spending? Or would you keep it on the same upward trajectory?

BUTTIGIEG: We need to re-prioritize our budget as a whole and our military spending in particular. It's not just how much, although we certainly need to look at the runaway growth in military spending. It's also where. Right now, we are spending a fraction of the attention and resources on things like the artificial intelligence research that China is doing right now. If we fall behind on artificial intelligence, the most expensive ships that the United States is building just turned into bigger targets. We do not have a 21st century security strategy coming from this president. After all, he's relying on 17th century security technologies, like a moat full of alligators or a big wall. There is no concept of strategic planning for how civilian, diplomatic, and military security work needs to take place for the future.

Click for Pete Buttigieg on other issues.   Source: November Democratic primary debate in Atlanta

Tulsi Gabbard on War & Peace : Nov 20, 2019
Oppose Bush-Clinton-Trump policy of regime-change wars

I want to rebuild our Democratic Party, takes it out of the hands of the foreign policy establishment in Washington, and truly puts it in the hands of the people of this country. A party that actually hears the voices of Americans who are struggling all across this country and puts it in the hands of veterans and fellow Americans who are calling for an end to this ongoing Bush-Clinton-Trump foreign policy doctrine of regime change wars, overthrowing dictators in other countries, needlessly sending my brothers and sisters in uniform into harm's way to fight in wars that actually undermine our national security and have cost us thousands of American lives.

These are wars that have cost us as American taxpayers trillions of dollars since 9/11 alone. As president, I will end this foreign policy, end these regime change wars, work to end this new cold war and arms race, and instead invest our hard-earned taxpayer dollars actually into serving the needs of the American people right here at home.

Click for Tulsi Gabbard on other issues.   Source: November Democratic primary debate in Atlanta

Bernie Sanders on War & Peace : Nov 20, 2019
Rethink War on Terror and make deal with Taliban

Q: Would you cut a deal with the Taliban to end the war, even if it means the collapse of the Afghan government?

SANDERS: After spending trillions of dollars on these endless wars, which have resulted in dislocation and mass migrations and pain in that region, it is time to bring our troops home. Unlike Trump, I will not do it through a tweet at 3 o'clock in the morning. I will do it working with the international community. If it's necessary to negotiate with the Taliban, we will do that.

Q: What about other military spending?

SANDERS: One of the big differences between the vice president and myself is he supported the terrible war in Iraq and I helped lead the opposition against it. And not only that, I voted against the very first Gulf War, as well I think we need a foreign policy which understands who our enemies are, that we don't have to spend more money on the military than the next 10 nations combined.

Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: November Democratic primary debate in Atlanta

Joe Biden on War & Peace : Oct 15, 2019
Troop withdrawal from Syria was shameful

I would not have withdrawn the troops [from the Kurdish areas of northern Syria, under threat from a Turkish invasion]. It has been the most shameful thing that any president has done in terms of foreign policy. I would be making it real clear to Assad that he's going to have a problem because Turkey is the real problem here. I would be having a real lockdown conversation with Erdogan and letting him know that he's going to pay a heavy price for what he has done.
Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: October Democratic CNN/NYTimes Primary debate

Joe Walsh on War & Peace : Oct 3, 2019
Congress must have a say in military force overseas

On presidential war power: "On the matter of the military and use of force, our founders assigned to Congress the power to declare war and to support the military, as a means to ensure that the President could not abuse his role as Commander-in-Chief. This balance reflects very practical logic: Through our elected representatives, we, the people, should have a say before we use military force overseas, imperil the lives of our men and women in uniform, and spend taxpayer money on expensive wars."
Click for Joe Walsh on other issues.   Source: Council on Foreign Relations on 2020 presidential hopefuls

Bernie Sanders on Homeland Security : Sep 12, 2019
We spend $750B on military & don't know who our enemy is

As the former chairman of the Senate Committee on Veterans Affairs, we cannot express our gratitude to all of the men and women who have put their lives on the line to defend us, who have responded to the call of duty. But I think, also, I am the only person up here to have voted against all three of Trump's military budgets.

I don't think we have to spend $750 billion a year on the military when we don't even know who our enemy is.

I think that what we have got to do is bring this world together-bring it together on climate change, bring it together in fighting against terrorism. And make it clear that we as a planet, as a global community, will work together to help countries around the world rebuild their struggling economies and do everything that we can to rid the world of terrorism. But dropping bomb on Afghanistan and Iraq was not the way to do it.

Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: September Democratic Primary debate in Houston

Andrew Yang on Homeland Security : Sep 4, 2019
Military dumps oil at end of year, to avoid losing budget

We're spending $750 billion that we know of on our military industrial complex every year. And I'm going to share a story that I heard secondhand. But there was a fighter pilot who said that his least favorite time of the year is at the end of the fiscal year, because he flies over the Pacific Ocean and dumps oil into the ocean.

Now, why is he doing that? Because they have to use all the oil that's budgeted, or else they won't get the same amount budgeted the following year.

So this broke my heart to even hear this story. We have to take some of that $750 billion and start channeling it towards our infrastructure.

We know we need to make our infrastructure more sustainable over time. Right now, there are hundreds of billions being spent on our military that is generating a ton of emissions and pollution. And so if we take a significant portion of that budget and channel it towards infrastructure, we can make a good out of right now a huge net negative.

Click for Andrew Yang on other issues.   Source: CNN Climate Crisis Town Hall marathon (10 Democrats)

Bernie Sanders on Homeland Security : Sep 4, 2019
Cut military spending to pay for fixing climate change

Q: Your climate plan is specific about how you will spend $16 trillion [over 15 years]. Can you be equally specific about where that money is coming from?

SANDERS: We have a moral responsibility to act boldly, and to do that, yes, it is going to be expensive. This is how we get the money.

  1. Insanely, right now we are giving the fossil fuel industry approximately $400 billion every single year in subsidies and tax breaks. Obviously, we end that.
  2. We believe that the federal government is the best way to move aggressively to produce sustainable energy, like wind and solar. We will expand public power concepts like the TVA.
  3. We are not going to have to spend money on the military defending oil interests around the world. We can cut military spending there, as well.
  4. Our program will create up to 20 million good- paying jobs over the period of the 15 years. And when we do that, you're going to have a lot of taxpayers out there who will be paying more in taxes
Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: CNN Climate Crisis Town Hall marathon (10 Democrats)

Beto O`Rourke on Homeland Security : Jul 30, 2019
We addressed suicide epidemic in El Paso VA & nationally

When I learned that the El Paso V.A. had the worst wait times for mental health care in the country, and was related to the suicide epidemic, we made it our priority. We took that lesson nationally and I worked with Republican and Democratic colleagues to expand medical health care to veterans, to show that, at the end of the day, we will put the American people first before party, before any other concern.
Click for Beto O`Rourke on other issues.   Source: July Democratic Primary debate (first night in Detroit)

Tim Ryan on Homeland Security : Jul 17, 2019
Boost the defense budget

Tim Ryan on Defense Spending: Boost the defense budget.

EIGHT CANDIDATES HAVE SIMILAR VIEWS: Michael Bennet; Joseph Biden, Jr.; Cory Booker; Peter Buttigieg; John Hickenlooper; Amy Klobuchar; Seth Moulton; Beto O`Rourke; Tim Ryan.

Other Democratic contenders align with the more moderate--or even hawkish--wing of the Democratic party and support larger defense budgets, especially in key areas they consider high priorities.

Click for Tim Ryan on other issues.   Source: Politico "2020Dems on the Issues"

Amy Klobuchar on Homeland Security : Jul 17, 2019
Boost the defense budget

Amy Klobuchar on Defense Spending: Boost the defense budget.

EIGHT CANDIDATES HAVE SIMILAR VIEWS: Michael Bennet; Joseph Biden, Jr.; Cory Booker; Peter Buttigieg; John Hickenlooper; Seth Moulton; Beto O`Rourke; Tim Ryan.

Other Democratic contenders align with the more moderate--or even hawkish--wing of the Democratic party and support larger defense budgets, especially in key areas they consider high priorities.

Click for Amy Klobuchar on other issues.   Source: Politico "2020Dems on the Issues"

Kirsten Gillibrand on Homeland Security : Jul 17, 2019
Slash the defense budget

Kirsten Gillibrand on Defense Spending: Slash the defense budget.

SIX CANDIDATES HAVE SIMILAR VIEWS: Tulsi Gabbard; Kamala Harris; Bernard Sanders; Eric Swalwell; Elizabeth Warren; Andrew Yang.

A sizable number of Democratic presidential candidates are doves with long track records of advocating deep cuts in the Pentagon budget in order to pay for what they consider more important domestic programs or diplomatic initiatives.

Click for Kirsten Gillibrand on other issues.   Source: Politico "2020Dems on the Issues"

Pete Buttigieg on Homeland Security : Jul 17, 2019
Boost the defense budget

Peter Buttigieg on Defense Spending: Boost the defense budget.

EIGHT CANDIDATES HAVE SIMILAR VIEWS: Michael Bennet; Joseph Biden, Jr.; Cory Booker; John Hickenlooper; Amy Klobuchar; Seth Moulton; Beto O`Rourke; Tim Ryan.

Other Democratic contenders align with the more moderate--or even hawkish--wing of the Democratic party and support larger defense budgets, especially in key areas they consider high priorities.

Click for Pete Buttigieg on other issues.   Source: Politico "2020Dems on the Issues"

John Hickenlooper on Homeland Security : Jul 17, 2019
Boost the defense budget

John Hickenlooper on Defense Spending: Boost the defense budget.

EIGHT CANDIDATES HAVE SIMILAR VIEWS: Michael Bennet; Joseph Biden, Jr.; Cory Booker; Peter Buttigieg; Amy Klobuchar; Seth Moulton; Beto O`Rourke; Tim Ryan.

Other Democratic contenders align with the more moderate--or even hawkish--wing of the Democratic party and support larger defense budgets, especially in key areas they consider high priorities.

Click for John Hickenlooper on other issues.   Source: Politico "2020Dems on the Issues"

Beto O`Rourke on Homeland Security : Jul 17, 2019
Boost the defense budget

Beto O`Rourke on Defense Spending: Boost the defense budget.

EIGHT CANDIDATES HAVE SIMILAR VIEWS: Michael Bennet; Joseph Biden, Jr.; Cory Booker; Peter Buttigieg; John Hickenlooper; Amy Klobuchar; Seth Moulton; Beto O`Rourke; Tim Ryan.

Other Democratic contenders align with the more moderate--or even hawkish--wing of the Democratic party and support larger defense budgets, especially in key areas they consider high priorities.

Click for Beto O`Rourke on other issues.   Source: Politico "2020Dems on the Issues"

Kamala Harris on Homeland Security : Jul 17, 2019
Slash the defense budget

Kamala Harris on Defense Spending: Slash the defense budget.

SIX CANDIDATES HAVE SIMILAR VIEWS: Tulsi Gabbard; Kirsten Gillibrand; Bernard Sanders; Eric Swalwell; Elizabeth Warren; Andrew Yang.

A sizable number of Democratic presidential candidates are doves with long track records of advocating deep cuts in the Pentagon budget in order to pay for what they consider more important domestic programs or diplomatic initiatives.

Click for Kamala Harris on other issues.   Source: Politico "2020Dems on the Issues"

Seth Moulton on Homeland Security : Jul 17, 2019
Boost the defense budget

Seth Moulton on Defense Spending: Boost the defense budget.

EIGHT CANDIDATES HAVE SIMILAR VIEWS: Michael Bennet; Joseph Biden, Jr.; Cory Booker; Peter Buttigieg; John Hickenlooper; Amy Klobuchar; Seth Moulton; Beto O`Rourke; Tim Ryan.

Other Democratic contenders align with the more moderate--or even hawkish--wing of the Democratic party and support larger defense budgets, especially in key areas they consider high priorities.

Click for Seth Moulton on other issues.   Source: Politico "2020Dems on the Issues"

Joe Biden on Homeland Security : Jul 17, 2019
Boost the defense budget

Joseph Biden on Defense Spending: Boost the defense budget.

EIGHT CANDIDATES HAVE SIMILAR VIEWS: Michael Bennet; Cory Booker; Peter Buttigieg; John Hickenlooper; Amy Klobuchar; Seth Moulton; Beto O`Rourke; Tim Ryan.

Other Democratic contenders align with the more moderate--or even hawkish--wing of the Democratic party and support larger defense budgets, especially in key areas they consider high priorities.

Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: Politico "2020Dems on the Issues"

Eric Swalwell on Homeland Security : Jul 17, 2019
Slash the defense budget

Eric Swalwell on Defense Spending: Slash the defense budget.

SIX CANDIDATES HAVE SIMILAR VIEWS: Tulsi Gabbard; Kirsten Gillibrand; Kamala Harris; Bernard Sanders; Elizabeth Warren; Andrew Yang.

A sizable number of Democratic presidential candidates are doves with long track records of advocating deep cuts in the Pentagon budget in order to pay for what they consider more important domestic programs or diplomatic initiatives.

Click for Eric Swalwell on other issues.   Source: Politico "2020Dems on the Issues"

Michael Bennet on Homeland Security : Jul 17, 2019
Boost the defense budget

Michael Bennet on Defense Spending: Boost the defense budget.

EIGHT CANDIDATES HAVE SIMILAR VIEWS: Michael Bennet; Joseph Biden, Jr.; Cory Booker; Peter Buttigieg; John Hickenlooper; Amy Klobuchar; Seth Moulton; Beto O`Rourke; Tim Ryan.

Other Democratic contenders align with the more moderate--or even hawkish--wing of the Democratic party and support larger defense budgets, especially in key areas they consider high priorities.

Click for Michael Bennet on other issues.   Source: Politico "2020Dems on the Issues"

Mark Sanford on Homeland Security : Jul 16, 2019
Biggest national security threat is debt and deficit

Sanford said he was considering a run for the presidency because he believes "we're walking away toward the most predictable financial crisis in the history of man."

"There is no discussion of debt, deficit and government spending these days," he said. "I've watched two Democratic presidential debates and there's been zero discussion on both of them as to this issue. The President said we're not going to touch the very things that drive debt and spending. So I think that we're walking away into one heck of a financial storm, and there's no discussion, and yet presidential years have historically been the year in which we do discuss these things."

Sanford says America will spend more on interest than on its national defense bill in just three years. When national security issues are discussed, Sanford says, what's left out of the discussion is a prediction of Adm. Mike Millen, former chairman of Joint Chiefs of Staff, who called the debt and deficit as the biggest security threat.

Click for Mark Sanford on other issues.   Source: MSN.com coverage of 2020 presidential hopefuls

Seth Moulton on War & Peace : Jul 10, 2019
AdWatch: Don't send troops back to Iraq

Click for Seth Moulton on other issues.   Source: OnTheIssues.org AdWatch: 2020 Democratic primary

Joe Sestak on Homeland Security : Jun 23, 2019
More funding for veterans and for cyberspace

Click for Joe Sestak on other issues.   Source: 2020 presidential campaign website JoeSestak.com

Howie Hawkins on Homeland Security : May 28, 2019
Cut military budget 75%; withdraw from 800 foreign bases

We want to cut the military budget by 75%. The biggest security threat we face is climate change. A $250 billion military budget will still be the world's largest. It is far less costly in terms of personnel and weapons to defend a home territory than to invade and occupy foreign territory. We are demanding that the US adopt a non-offensive defense posture, withdraw from over 800 foreign military bases, and be the world's humanitarian superpower instead of its global military empire.
Click for Howie Hawkins on other issues.   Source: Declaration of Candidacy for the Green Party Nomination

Tulsi Gabbard on War & Peace : May 19, 2019
Ending regime change wars allows investment at home

I will end these counterproductive and wasteful regime change wars, work to end this new Cold War and nuclear arms race. And take the trillions of dollars that we've been spending, would continue to spend and invest those resources on serving the needs of the American people, things like healthcare, education, rebuilding our crumbling infrastructure, protecting our environment. There are many urgent needs here that we need to address and we've got to get our priorities straight.
Click for Tulsi Gabbard on other issues.   Source: ABC This Week 2019 interview of presidential hopefuls

Mike Gravel on War & Peace : Apr 9, 2019
Split DoD into Department of War and Department of Peace

The Department of Defense has benefitted from its Orwellian moniker for too long: who could justify cutting "defense" spending? The Founders recognized that "Department of War," a name that accurately reflected the purpose and activities of the body, was a more fitting name. But that's not enough to push back on the overwhelming power of the Department of Defense. A Department of Peace, as proposed in 1793 by Benjamin Rush, should exist to promote peacebuilding and conflict prevention whenever necessary.
Click for Mike Gravel on other issues.   Source: 2020 Presidential campaign website MikeGravel.com

Marianne Williamson on Homeland Security : Apr 8, 2019
Make suicide prevention a top priority for veterans & VA

Every day, an average of 20 U.S. veterans commit suicide. We must not stop working until every veteran and service member has access to the best mental health care and community support. I will direct my VA Secretary to make suicide prevention a top priority.

When our service members come home from service, it is critical that they get the support they deserve. As our brave women and men of the military are transitioning out of service and reintegrating back into society, the right support can make all the difference during their transition and in the ensuing months and years. Many veterans don't even know about the variety of services that are available to support them, nor do they know how to take advantage of them. Solving this lack of outreach to veterans will involve coordinating efforts between the military, the veteran's administration, and outside non-profit groups and community centers.

Click for Marianne Williamson on other issues.   Source: 2020 presidential campaign website Marianne2020.com

Andrew Yang on Homeland Security : Mar 29, 2019
Military spending on modern threats, not decades-old ones

Click for Andrew Yang on other issues.   Source: 2020 presidential campaign website Yang2020.com

John Delaney on Homeland Security : Mar 27, 2019
Voted for 25 out of 28 military spending bills

Former Rep. John Delaney voted for 25 out of 28 military spending bills since 2013, earning a 53 percent Peace Action voting record.
Click for John Delaney on other issues.   Source: Truthout.org, "War and Peace," on 2020 presidential hopefuls

Cory Booker on Homeland Security : Mar 27, 2019
Supports military spending on Foreign Affairs Committee

Click for Cory Booker on other issues.   Source: Truthout.org, "War and Peace," on 2020 presidential hopefuls

Beto O`Rourke on Homeland Security : Mar 27, 2019
Supported 11th aircraft carrier; opposed 1% military cut

Click for Beto O`Rourke on other issues.   Source: Truthout.org, "War and Peace," on 2020 presidential hopefuls

Tulsi Gabbard on Homeland Security : Mar 27, 2019
Don't cut military budget; fund weapons systems & ABMs

Click for Tulsi Gabbard on other issues.   Source: Truthout.org, "War and Peace," on 2020 presidential hopefuls

Andrew Yang on Homeland Security : Mar 27, 2019
Too much military spending focuses in decades-old threats

Yang promises to "bring our military spending under control," to "make it harder for the U.S. to get involved in foreign engagements with no clear goal," and to "reinvest in diplomacy."

He believes that much of the military budget "is focused on defending against threats from decades ago as opposed to the threats of 2020."

Click for Andrew Yang on other issues.   Source: Truthout.org, "War and Peace," on 2020 presidential hopefuls

Amy Klobuchar on Homeland Security : Mar 27, 2019
Voted for 95% of military spending bills in Congress

Click for Amy Klobuchar on other issues.   Source: Truthout.org, "War and Peace," on 2020 presidential hopefuls

Elizabeth Warren on Homeland Security : Mar 27, 2019
End stranglehold of defense contractors on military policy

  • Her campaign website says that she supports "cutting our bloated defense budget and ending the stranglehold of defense contractors on our military policy." But she has voted to approve over 2/3 of the military spending bills that have come before her in the Senate.
  • Her website also says, "It's time to bring the troops home," and that she supports "reinvesting in diplomacy." She has come out in favor of the U.S. rejoining the Iran nuclear agreement and has also proposed legislation that would prevent the United States from using nuclear weapons as a first-strike option, saying she wants to "reduce the chances of a nuclear miscalculation."
    Click for Elizabeth Warren on other issues.   Source: Truthout.org, "War and Peace," on 2020 presidential hopefuls

    Bernie Sanders on War & Peace : Mar 27, 2019
    Cut military spending, except F-35 at Vermont air base

    Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: Truthout.org, "War and Peace," on 2020 presidential hopefuls

    Kirsten Gillibrand on War & Peace : Mar 27, 2019
    Withdraw from Yemen; Withdraw from Afghanistan

    Click for Kirsten Gillibrand on other issues.   Source: Truthout.org, "War and Peace," on 2020 presidential hopefuls

    Tulsi Gabbard on War & Peace : Mar 12, 2019
    No more wars for regime change, like Syria and Afghanistan

    Her big idea: A central part of Ms Gabbard's campaign has been her call for an end to US-led "regime change wars"--in Syria and Afghanistan. She also condemns runaway military spending as a "new arms race". As a major in the US Army reserve and a veteran of the Iraq War, Ms Gabbard has a unique perch from which to launch her critique.

    Her biggest obstacle: Her foreign policy has also been a source of controversy. In 2017 she met President Bashar Assad in Syria and has questioned the international consensus that the Syrian government has used chemical weapons against its own citizens.

    "I served in a war in Iraq, a war that was based on lies," she said. "I think that the evidence needs to be gathered." She refused to label Mr Assad as a "war criminal"--a position that sets her well apart from the majority of US politicians and the American people.

    Click for Tulsi Gabbard on other issues.   Source: BBC.com on 2020 Democratic primary contenders at 2019 SXSW

    Tulsi Gabbard on Homeland Security : Mar 11, 2019
    End this new cold war and nuclear arms race

    Gabbard was asked Sunday to name the biggest policy mistake the United States had ever made. She pointed to the march toward what she warned could be "nuclear catastrophe."

    She pointed to a cell phone alert -- which turned out to be a false alarm -- last year warning people in Hawaii to take shelter because a missile was incoming. She described residents of the state facing agonizing decisions about how to seek shelter and who to spend what they feared could be their last minutes with.

    "This alert turned out to be false, but the reason we reacted the way we did is that the threat is real," Gabbard said. "Our leaders have failed us and brought us to this point. It doesn't have to be this way. We have to correct our course. We have to end this new cold war and nuclear arms race that is currently being waged that threatens our very future and that costs us trillions of our taxpayer dollars--dollars that need to be spent and invested to serve the needs of our people here at home."

    Click for Tulsi Gabbard on other issues.   Source: CNN KFile on 2019 SXSW conference in Austin

    Donald Trump on War & Peace : Mar 8, 2019
    Countries hosting US troops should pay for them

    The administration is drawing up demands that Germany, Japan and any other country hosting U.S. troops pay the full price of American soldiers deployed on their soil--plus 50 percent or more for the privilege of hosting them. His insistence on it almost derailed recent talks with South Korea over the status of 28,000 U.S. troops in the country when he overruled his negotiators with a note to National Security Advisor John Bolton saying, "We want cost plus 50."
    Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Bloomberg News, "Huge Premium" on 2020 presidential hopefuls

    Pete Buttigieg on Homeland Security : Feb 12, 2019
    Recognize Vietnam Veterans Day, as late honor

    At the Vietnam Welcome Home event, I said: "At the end of my tour in Afghanistan, the reception couldn't have been better. At the airport, people lined up to shake our hands, waving flags." A little choked up, I continued to the point. "Many of you did not get that welcome home. And it's a shame. These days, as a society, we have learned how to separate how we feel about a policy and how we treat the men and women sent overseas to serve. That wasn't true for Vietnam veterans. I'm sorry that not everyone thanked you properly. I'm sorry that this is coming late: Thank you. And welcome home."

    Recognizing Vietnam Veterans Day has only begun in the last few years, but it quickly became another occasion for me to see how important a symbolic act can be. Some of the vet's eyes water. It's clear to them the honor however late in their lives, is meaningful. One of them tells me he was 18 when he went, "They called me a baby-killer when I got back," he says, staring into the distance.

    Click for Pete Buttigieg on other issues.   Source: Shortest Way Home, by Pete Buttigieg, p.258-9

    Pete Buttigieg on War & Peace : Feb 12, 2019
    Afghanistan war was "outsourced" to the few in uniform

    [After 9/11], little was said about personal sacrifice at home for the purpose of winning a national conflict. Kids in World War II saved tinfoil from gum wrappers for the war effort, women reused nylon stockings as many times as possible, and everyone then knew why they were being asked to pay much higher taxes. This time around, it seemed that the war effort was wholly outsourced to those few Americans who served in uniform. America tripped over itself to salute them, without seeming to consider the possibility that civilians, too, could accept some risk or pay some contribution into the cause of freedom.

    We might have had, in those years, a more serious conversation about what each of us owes to the country in a time of conflict.

    Click for Pete Buttigieg on other issues.   Source: Shortest Way Home, by Pete Buttigieg, p. 49

    Donald Trump on Homeland Security : Feb 5, 2019
    Withdraw from INF and develop Missile Defense System

    We have begun to fully rebuild the military--with $700 billion last year and $716 billion this year. We are also getting other nations to pay their fair share. For years, the US was being treated very unfairly by NATO--but now we have secured a $100 billion increase in defense spending from NATO allies.

    As part of our military build-up, the US is developing a state-of-the-art Missile Defense System.

    Decades ago the United States entered into a treaty with Russia in which we agreed to limit and reduce our missile capabilities. While we followed the agreement to the letter, Russia repeatedly violated its terms. That is why I announced that the United States is officially withdrawing from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, or INF Treaty.

    Perhaps we can negotiate a different agreement, adding China and others, or perhaps we can't--in which case, we will outspend and out-innovate all others by far.

    Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: 2019 State of the Union address to United States Congress

    Marianne Williamson on Homeland Security : Jul 24, 2018
    Military expenditures are 54% of all discretionary funding

    President Eisenhower [warned in 1961 that] "we must not fail to comprehend grave implications. [of] an immense military establishment and a large arms industry We clearly did not heed his warnings. Our military expenditures have steadily increased to the point where they are 54% of all discretionary federal funds.

    World military spending totaled more than $1.6 trillion in 2015, and the U.S. accounted for 37% of the total. The budget of our Defense Department, for instance is $600 billion, 24 times more than the $26.5 billion allotted to the Department of State.

    Are we being served or are we being robbed? Are we being protected or are we being turned into a militaristic nation whose citizens are being led to believe that brute force rather than adherence to our values is the fulcrum of security?

    In truth, our military budget is more an expression of the financial appetites of our military-industrial complex than it is a truly wise response to admittedly very real threats.

    Click for Marianne Williamson on other issues.   Source: Healing the Soul of America, by Marianne Williamson, p.167-8

    John Kasich on War & Peace : Jun 6, 2018
    Forward-deploy US forces in the Pacific to challenge China

    China does not need to be contained as the Soviet Union once did during the Cold War [but] deterring China also has a military dimension. The U.S. military should forward-deploy greater numbers of forces in the western Pacific and continue to challenge China's illegal attempts to expand its territorial control there. Washington should make it clear that there will be a significant price to pay for any attack on U.S. assets in space and expand our regional allies' missile and air defense capabilities. In the long run, however, the best chance for peace lies in a China that itself chooses reform. To kick-start that process, we will have to support efforts to give mass audiences in China better access to the unvarnished truth about what is going on in the world.
    Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: 2020 presidential hopeful Kasich column in Foreign Affairs

    John Delaney on Homeland Security : May 29, 2018
    National service program, plus community & veterans' service

    Click for John Delaney on other issues.   Source: The Right Answer, by Rep. John Delaney, p.141-4

    Bernie Sanders on Homeland Security : Apr 16, 2018
    Undertake comprehensive audit of Department of Defense

    On domestic policy, there are major differences between the Democratic Party and the Republican Party. On foreign policy, not so much.

    Several months ago, Democrats, with virtually no opposition, gave President Trump every nickel that he wanted in increased defense spending. At a time [of great domestic needs], there were very few Democrats opposed to Republican efforts to increase military spending by $165 billion over two years.

    Democrats, for good reason, vehemently oppose almost everything Trump proposes, but when he asks for a huge increase in military spending, there are almost no voices in dissent. Why is that? Do we really have to spend more on the military than the next ten nations combined--most of which are our allies? Why do we dramatically increase funding when the Department of Defense remains the only government agency not to have undertaken a comprehensive audit? Why is there so little discussion about the billions in waste, fraud, and cost overruns at the Pentagon?

    Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: Where We Go From Here, by Bernie Sanders, p.182-3

    Bernie Sanders on Homeland Security : Apr 1, 2018
    Don't privatize the Veterans Administration

    Q: Will you support Dr. Ronny Jackson as the nominee for the Veterans Administration?

    SANDERS: Well, we know nothing about Dr. Jackson's vision for the VA. But what concerns me is that, right now in Washington, we have a family called the Koch brothers--with a few of their other billionaire friends--their view has been we have got to privatize, privatize, and privatize. And Dr. Shulkin [the previous DVA chief], who Trump fired this week, said the reason for his firing is that he resisted privatization of the Veterans Administration. I work very closely with the major veterans organizations, and what they say is they want to strengthen the VA, not dismember it, not privatize it.

    Q: Well, the White House says, at this time, they have no intent to privatize the VA.

    SANDERS: They have been putting more money into the private sector with VA money. I do not believe them on that issue. I think they are listening to the Koch brothers. And I think that that is a very, very bad idea.

    Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: CBS Face the Nation 2018 interviews of 2020 hopefuls

    Arvin Vohra on Homeland Security : Mar 30, 2018
    Shut down foreign military bases & withdraw from NATO

    Q: Do you support or oppose expanding the military?

    A: Strongly oppose. The mission has been, frankly, corrupted. It is unconscionable to encourage young men and women to pursue morally dubious work in the service of an ill-considered, nonstrategic foreign policy. I would sponsor legislation to reduce military personnel to the bare minimum needed for defense of America. I would sponsor legislation to shut down foreign military bases, end involvement in foreign civil wars, and withdraw from NATO.

    Click for Arvin Vohra on other issues.   Source: OnTheIssues interview of 2018 Maryland Senate candidate

    Arvin Vohra on Homeland Security : Feb 22, 2018
    Cut military spending by 60% or more

    The following issues were listed on Vohra's campaign website:

    Cut Military Spending by 60% or More: If elected, I will immediately sponsor legislation to cut military spending by 60% or more, end all trade sanctions, and cut taxes accordingly. This will reduce the violence against our country and enhance our global economic capabilities.

    Click for Arvin Vohra on other issues.   Source: Ballotpedia.org on 2018 Maryland Senate race

    Donald Trump on Homeland Security : Jan 30, 2018
    Fire 1,500 VA employees who failed to serve veterans

    We are serving our brave veterans, including giving our veterans choice in their healthcare decisions. Last year, the Congress passed, and I signed, the landmark VA Accountability Act. Since its passage, my Administration has already removed more than 1,500 VA employees who failed to give our veterans the care they deserve--and we are hiring talented people who love our vets as much as we do. I will not stop until our veterans are properly taken care of, which has been my promise to them from the very beginning of this great journey.

    All Americans deserve accountability and respect--and that is what we are giving them. So tonight, I call on the Congress to empower every Cabinet Secretary with the authority to reward good workers--and to remove Federal employees who undermine the public trust or fail the American people.

    Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: 2018 State of the Union address

    John Kasich on Homeland Security : Dec 27, 2017
    Improve veteran healthcare with more options & fewer delays

    The same kinds of policies that John Kasich has deployed successfully in Ohio to support veterans will be a model for the veterans policies he pursues as president. A particular focus will be health care, where he supports improving the current system as well as giving veterans new flexibilities and options to eliminate delays for needed care.
    Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: 2016 presidential campaign website, JohnKasich.com

    John Kasich on Homeland Security : Dec 27, 2017
    Easier licensing for veterans; and more job services

    Veterans have advanced training and experience in many of the skills that Ohio job creators are seeking. Reforms Gov. Kasich pursued in 2014 made it easier for veterans to transfer their skills to receive licensure credit so they can quickly begin applying their skills in good-paying jobs that support their families. Further, Ohio's state licensing boards and commissions have adopted consistent military definitions and made changes to their applications and policies to make certain that veterans and spouses are identified and prioritized.

    Ohio created OhioMeansVeteranJobs.com--an online resource offering veterans a host of services to help them get a job. The website has a "military skills translator" that helps map military experience to job skills to build a resume from military service. For businesses looking for qualified workers, Ohio created the Veterans Business Support Center to assist employers in locating qualified veteran candidates for job openings.

    Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: 2016 presidential campaign website, JohnKasich.com

    Joe Biden on War & Peace : Oct 24, 2017
    Vietnam war was horrendous waste based on a flawed premise

    [In his 1972 Senate race, Biden] used the Vietnam War as a wedge issue, denouncing it as a "stupid and horrendous waste of time, money, and lives based on a flawed premise," and wondering why the United States was "spending so much energy in Southeast Asia that we had left truly vital interests unattended." (Swap out "Southeast Asia" with "Middle East," and it's easy to spot a coherent through-line from 1972 to the present.)
    Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: The Book of Joe, by Jeff Wilser,

    John Kasich on Homeland Security : Apr 25, 2017
    Focused on excess spending on Armed Services Committee

    [In 1983], my first committee assignment as a young congressman was on the House Armed Services Committee, where I quickly became immersed in some of the lingering cold war tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union.

    Perhaps the biggest headline I made on the House Armed Services Committee was my focus on excess spending. Like most Republicans, I'd always been strong on defense, but once in Congress, I started paying particular attention to some of the costs in our federal budget. The one didn't always go hand in hand with the other, I was realizing. However, this realization put me in conflict with some of my colleagues on both sides of the aisle, who came to see me as a part of group they viewed as "cheap hawks." No matter where I saw wasteful spending, I believe it needed to be eliminated, even in our military, but Republicans weren't supposed to think in this way, so my position set some people off.

    Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: Two Paths, by John Kasich, p. 98-99

    John Kasich on Homeland Security : Apr 25, 2017
    1980s: B-2 didn't make financial sense nor strategic sense

    The B-2 was supposed to be an essential weapon in our Cold War arsenal. I didn't quite see it that way. I couldn't justify or even understand the projected long-term cost of a single plane (nearly $2 billion). It wasn't just that the program didn't make financial sense; it didn't make strategic sense, either. Why spend all that money for a bunch of planes capable of dropping multiple nuclear bombs over the Soviet Union when one bomb would certainly get the message across? It was the very definition of overkill.

    We set about trying to pare back the B-2 proposal, and perhaps redirect some of those monies to the development of standoff weapons, which we believed would be more strategically effective as well as more cost-effective. We were never out to kill the proposal entirely; in response to an initial proposal of 132 bombers, we proposed a more modest plan of just 13. The projected squadron was cut to a final compromise of 20 B-2 bombers. So that's where we landed on this issue--an incredible win.

    Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: Two Paths, by John Kasich, p.101-2

    John Kasich on Homeland Security : Apr 25, 2017
    Cutting Pentagon budget doesn't weaken defense

    [In the 1980s when I sought to cut wasteful spending in the military], my thinking was this: Just because you're out to curb some of the ridiculous costs doesn't mean you're out to weaken the nation's defense. The Pentagon budget was bloated; yet only a few people were speaking out against it. The talk all over Washington was about the need for cuts in our social welfare and entitlement programs, while there was an unspoken agreement that we were not supposed to be critical of our defense spending.
    Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: Two Paths, by John Kasich, p. 99

    Elizabeth Warren on Homeland Security : Apr 18, 2017
    Reagan military spending meant more bombs & fewer textbooks

    Under Reagan, defense spending rose by 34 percent. And spending that was already guaranteed by law, like Social Security and Medicare, remained out of the Republicans' reach. But all other spending that Congress had to approve year after year was now on the chopping block. All the spending on education, on infrastructure, and on research.

    The trickle-down policies of the Reagan years shifted American' priorities. 1 At the same time that military spending expanded significantly, school funding was slashed by 15 percent. More bombs and fewer text books. And when the politicians figured out there was no price to pay politically, the cuts just kept on coming. Even during the Obama years, federal funding for education took a hard hit. In 2011, Republicans bargained for another 15% cut in return for increasing the debt ceiling and thus preventing the complete disruption of financial markets around the world.

    Click for Elizabeth Warren on other issues.   Source: This Fight is Our Fight, by Sen. Elizabeth Warren, p.118

    Donald Trump on War & Peace : Apr 8, 2017
    Stay out of Syria, and keep Syrians out of America

    Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Straits Times (Singapore) on Trump Administration promises

    Cory Booker on Homeland Security : Apr 1, 2017
    No irresponsible spending on weapons military doesn't want

    BROKEN PROMISE: : Booker said on his Senate campaign website, "America has, and must continue to maintain, the strongest military force in the world." But he cites on the same website that Congress engages in "irresponsible spending on weapons our military doesn't want." Booker made these two inherently conflicting promises, attempting to portray himself as a moderate on defense spending. He contradicts himself in that pair of promises, and his promise on the "strongest military" was belied by his NAY vote on Congress' biggest military package

    ANALYSIS: Booker opposed the "National Defense Authorization Act" which President Obama vetoed (agreeing with Booker) because it "underfunds our military in the base budget, and instead relies on an irresponsible budget gimmick of Overseas Contingency Operations funding." Booker's ambiguous campaign promise has the usual purpose of attempting to please both sides at once by being intentionally vague.

    Click for Cory Booker on other issues.   Source: Cory Booker 'Promises Broken,' by Jesse Gordon, p.119

    Donald Trump on Homeland Security : Feb 28, 2017
    Meaningful engagement with allies paying their fair share

    Our foreign policy calls for a direct, robust and meaningful engagement with the world. It is American leadership based on vital security interests that we share with our allies across the globe. We strongly support NATO, an alliance forged through the bonds of two World Wars that dethroned fascism, and a Cold War that defeated communism.

    But our partners must meet their financial obligations. And now, based on our very strong and frank discussions, they are beginning to do just that. We expect our partners, whether in NATO, in the Middle East, or the Pacific--to take a direct and meaningful role in both strategic and military operations, and pay their fair share of the cost. We will respect historic institutions, but we will also respect the sovereign rights of nations.

    My job is not to represent the world. My job is to represent the United States of America. But we know that America is better off, when there is less conflict--not more.

    Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: 2017 State of the Union address to Congress

    Donald Trump on Homeland Security : Feb 28, 2017
    More tools so our military can fight and win

    To keep America safe, we must provide the men and women of the United States military with the tools they need to prevent war and--if they must--to fight and to win.

    I am sending the Congress a budget that rebuilds the military, eliminates the Defense sequester, and calls for one of the largest increases in national defense spending in American history.

    My budget will also increase funding for our veterans. Our veterans have delivered for this Nation--and now we must deliver for them.

    Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: 2017 State of the Union address to Congress

    Bernie Sanders on Homeland Security : Nov 15, 2016
    Spending on military means fewer resources for people

    How many cities of forty thousand, which is the population of Burlington, have a foreign policy? Well, we did. During my tenure as mayor we made the point that excessive spending on the military and unnecessary wars meant fewer resources to address the needs of ordinary people. Somewhere in the Reagan Library, or wherever these things are kept, there is a letter from the mayor of Burlington opposing the U.S. funding of contras in Nicaragua. The letter stated, "Stop the war against the people of Nicaragua. Use our tax dollars to feed the hungry and house the homeless. Stop killing the innocent people of Nicaragua."

    As mayor of Burlington, I helped establish two sister-city programs. One was with the town of Puerto Cabezas in Nicaragua. The other was with the city of Yaroslavl in what was then the Soviet Union. Both programs continue today.

    Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: Our Revolution, by Bernie Sanders, p. 38

    Tulsi Gabbard on War & Peace : Nov 15, 2016
    Iraq was a war we never should have gotten into

    Representative Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii joined our campaign in a rather dramatic fashion: She resigned as vice chair of the Democratic National Committee. Tulsi, a veteran of the war in Iraq, is deeply concerned about foreign and military policy. She saw the lives of too many of her comrades destroyed by a war we should never have gotten into, and she wanted policies to make sure that we never got into another such war again.
    Click for Tulsi Gabbard on other issues.   Source: Our Revolution, by Bernie Sanders, p.102

    Rocky De La Fuente on Homeland Security : Nov 1, 2016
    Balance budget by reducing defense spending

    Q: In order to balance the budget, do you support reducing defense spending?

    A: Yes.

    Q: Do you support an income tax increase on any tax bracket?

    A: The reason for my position on taxation is predicated upon prioritization. I believe we should first try to eliminate fraud and waste from our current government programs before we assess any increased level of taxation upon the people. If we ultimately determine that we need additional tax revenues, I would not be opposed to considering it.

    Click for Rocky De La Fuente on other issues.   Source: VoteSmart Presidential Election 2016 Political Courage Test

    Donald Trump on Homeland Security : Sep 28, 2016
    FactCheck: US spends more than NATO, but only 22% on NATO

    Trump said, "The 28 countries of NATO, many of them aren't paying their fair share.... We pay approximately 73% of the cost of NATO." [Is that true?]

    The US share is calculated on the basis of GDP--and adjusted regularly. Currently that's 22%, compared to about 15% for Germany, 11% for France, 10% for the UK, 8% for Italy, 7% for Canada, and so forth--based on NATO's guideline, established in 2006, that defense expenditures should amount to 2% of each country's GDP. The median spending in 2015 is just 1.18% of GDP, compared to 3.7% for the US, Just four other countries currently exceed the 2% guideline.

    However, on INDIRECT funding, NATO says, "The volume of the US defense expenditure effectively represents 73% of the defense spending of the Alliance."

    In short, direct funding of NATO is allocated on a reasonable formula, with the US paying just 22% of the cost. But indirect funding is a different issue, with U.S. defense spending far exceeding the spending of other NATO members.

    Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Washington Post Fact-check on First 2016 Presidential Debate

    Donald Trump on Homeland Security : Sep 26, 2016
    We defend Germany, Japan, Saudi Arabia: they need to pay

    TRUMP: We defend Japan, we defend Germany, we defend South Korea, we defend Saudi Arabia, we defend countries. They do not pay us. But they should be paying us, because we are providing tremendous service and we're losing a fortune. It's very possible that if they don't pay a fair share, because this isn't 40 years ago where we could do what we're doing. We can't defend Japan, a behemoth, selling us cars by the million. They may have to defend themselves or they have to help us out. We're a country that owes $20 trillion. They have to help us out.

    CLINTON: I want to reassure our allies in Japan and South Korea and elsewhere that we have mutual defense treaties and we will honor them. It is essential that America's word be good. On behalf of a majority of the American people, I want to say that our word is good.

    TRUMP: And as far as Japan is concerned, I want to help all of our allies, but we are losing billions and billions of dollars. We cannot be the policemen of the world.

    Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: First 2016 Presidential Debate at Hofstra University

    Hillary Clinton on Homeland Security : Sep 7, 2016
    Move V.A. into 21st century, but not by privatizing

    TRUMP: Hillary Clinton six months ago said the vets are being treated essentially just fine, there's no real problem, it's over-exaggerated. She said she was satisfied with what was going on in the Veterans Administration.

    Q [to Clinton]: Last October you said that surveys of veterans show that they're overall satisfied with their treatment and that the problems with the V.A. aren't as widespread as they're made out to be.

    CLINTON: Look, I was outraged by the stories that came out about the V.A. And I have been very clear about the necessity for doing whatever is required to move the V.A. into the 21st century, to provide the kind of treatment options that our veterans today desperately need and deserve. And that's what I will do as president. But I will not let the V.A. be privatized. And I do think there is an agenda out there, supported by my opponent, to do just that. I think that would be very disastrous for our military veterans.

    Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: 2016 NBC Commander-in-Chief forum

    Kamala Harris on Homeland Security : Aug 31, 2016
    Champion a robust VA for our Veterans

    With more than two million Veterans, California has more Veterans than any other state, and we owe them the support and care they earned while wearing our nation's military uniform. Over the years, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has been plagued by scandal and budget crises, resulting in disgraceful levels of service and irresponsible delays in providing medical care and disability benefits.

    As Attorney General, Kamala formed a working group to fight scams and other predatory conduct uniquely targeting service members, and secured enhanced protections for active-duty and Veteran homeowners during the foreclosure crisis.

    In the Senate, Kamala will champion a robust VA for our Veterans. She will fight to ensure that when Veterans leave military service, they have the support they need to readjust to civilian life, including proper physical and mental health care. It's unconscionable that 22 Veterans take their own lives each day.

    Click for Kamala Harris on other issues.   Source: 2016 California Senate campaign website, KamalaHarris.org

    Donald Trump on Homeland Security : Aug 23, 2016
    South Korea and Japan should pay 100% of US military costs

    The news coming out of the meeting was about Trump saying that maybe the United States didn't need to put so much money into NATO, the core of the European-American security alliance since the Cold War-- the kind of statement that might win nods or applause at a rally, but sparked shock and ridicule in the corridors of think tanks and policy shops in Washington.

    "NATO was set up when we were a richer country," Trump said. "We're not a rich country. We're borrowing, we're borrowing all of this money."

    But you do know, editorial writer Charles Lane said, that South Korea and Japan pay half of the administrative cost of keeping the American military in those countries, right?

    "Fifty percent?" Trump asked.

    "Yeah," Lane confirmed.

    "Why isn't it one hundred percent?"

    Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Trump Revealed, by Michael Kranish & Mark Fisher, p. 11

    Mike Pence on Homeland Security : Jul 20, 2016
    We see promise after promise to our veterans forgotten

    We have seen borders that go unrespected, a military that has been diminished, promise after ringing promise to our veterans promptly forgotten. Then Donald Trump came along and started saying what practically everybody was thinking anyway, that our leaders need to be stronger.

    Under Donald Trump, our deals will be stronger. Under Donald Trump, our deals will be smarter, our soldiers will have what they need, and our veterans will have what they earned.

    Click for Mike Pence on other issues.   Source: Speech at the 2016 Republican National Convention

    Bill Weld on Homeland Security : Jun 22, 2016
    Maintain invincible defense but cut military 20%

    Q: How do you balance maintaining the military while attempting to eliminate wasteful spending?

    WELD: The baseline position of the Libertarian Party is an invincible defense. An invincible defense includes projection of military supremacy both air and naval around the world, because people around the world really do pay attention. It does not encompass interventionism, boots on the ground, American blood on foreign soil. [But] every agency has 20% waste [so we will cut the military by 20%].

    Click for Bill Weld on other issues.   Source: CNN Libertarian Town Hall: joint interview of Johnson & Weld

    Mike Pence on Homeland Security : Mar 22, 2016
    Supported expanding benefits and opportunities for veterans

    Pence signed more than a dozen bills he says will expand benefits and opportunities for Indiana's military servicemembers and veterans. [One veteran's spokesperson], who led the Indiana National Guard for 11 years, says he's particularly pleased with one that expands the Military Family Relief Fund. That program was originally created to help post-9/11 veterans pay food, housing, utility, transportation and medical bills. Umbarger says the legislation extends that help to all veterans.
    Click for Mike Pence on other issues.   Source: WFYI news "Pence Signs 13 Bills," 2016 Indiana Governor race

    Hillary Clinton on Homeland Security : Feb 4, 2016
    Fight the idea of privatizing the V.A.

    Q: You will likely face a Republican opponent who wants to privatize or even abolish big parts of the V.A. It's a newly popular idea in conservative politics.

    CLINTON: First of all, I'm absolutely against privatizing the V.A. I am going do everything I can to build on the reforms that Senator Sanders and others in Congress have passed to try to fix what's wrong with the V.A. There are a lot of issues about wait times & services that have to be fixed because our veterans deserve nothing but the best. Yes, let's fix the V.A., but we will never let it be privatized, and that is a promise.

    SANDERS: Republicans give a lot of speeches about how much they love veterans. But when it came to put money on the line [in my comprehensive veterans bill], to protect our veterans, frankly, they were not there. Secretary Clinton is absolutely right, there are people, a group called Concerned Veterans of America, funded by the Koch brothers, yes, there are people out there who want to privatize it.

    Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: MSNBC Democratic primary debate in New Hampshire

    Hillary Clinton on Homeland Security : Feb 4, 2016
    Promise to never privatize V.A.

    Q: You will likely face a Republican opponent who wants to privatize or even abolish big parts of the V.A. It's a newly popular idea in conservative politics.

    CLINTON: I'm absolutely against privatizing the V.A. And I am going do everything I can to build on the reforms that Senator Sanders and others in Congress have passed to try to fix what's wrong with the V.A. There are a lot of issues about wait times and services that have to be fixed because our veterans deserve nothing but the best. Yes, let's fix the V.A., but we will never let it be privatized, and that is a promise.

    SANDERS: Republicans give a lot of speeches about how much they love veterans. But when it came to put money on the line [in my comprehensive veterans bill], to protect our veterans, frankly, they were not there. Secretary Clinton is absolutely right, there are people, Koch brothers among others, who have a group called Concerned Veterans of America, who want to privatize.

    Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: MSNBC Democratic primary debate in New Hampshire

    Bernie Sanders on Homeland Security : Feb 4, 2016
    Strengthen the V.A.; don't privatize the V.A.

    CLINTON: I'm absolutely against privatizing the V.A. I am going do everything I can to build on the reforms that Senator Sanders and others in Congress have passed to try to fix what's wrong with the V.A. .

    SANDERS: Republicans give a lot of speeches about how much they love veterans. I work with the American Legion, the VFW, the DAV, the Vietnam Vets, and virtually every veterans organization to put together the most comprehensive piece of the veterans legislation in the modern history of America. Every Democrat voted for it; I got two Republicans. That is pathetic. So Republicans talk a good game about veterans, but when it came to put money on the line to protect our veterans, frankly, they were not there. Secretary Clinton is absolutely right, there are people, Koch brothers among others, who have a group called Concerned Veterans of America, funded by the Koch brothers, yes, there are people out there who want to privatize it. We've got to strengthen the V.A. We do not privatize the V.A.

    Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: MSNBC Democratic primary debate in New Hampshire

    Bernie Sanders on Homeland Security : Feb 4, 2016
    Promise to never privatize V.A.

    Q: You will likely face a Republican opponent who wants to privatize or even abolish big parts of the V.A. It's a newly popular idea in conservative politics.

    SANDERS: Republicans give a lot of speeches about how much they love veterans. But when it came to put money on the line [in my comprehensive veterans bill], to protect our veterans, frankly, they were not there. There are people, Koch brothers among others, who have a group called Concerned Veterans of America, who want to privatize it.

    CLINTON: I'm absolutely against privatizing the V.A. And I am going do everything I can to build on the reforms that Senator Sanders and others in Congress have passed to try to fix what's wrong with the V.A. There are a lot of issues about wait times and services that have to be fixed because our veterans deserve nothing but the best. Yes, let's fix the V.A., but we will never let it be privatized, and that is a promise.

    Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: MSNBC Democratic primary debate in New Hampshire

    Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Jan 13, 2016
    We spend more on military than next 8 nations combined

    President Obama said, "We spend more on our military than the next eight nations combined." Is that literally true? We found the answer on Wikipedia, for the top 9 countries in military expenditures (in billions per year):
    1. $581B United States
    2. $129B China
    3. $81B Saudi Arabia
    4. $70B Russia
    5. $62B United Kingdom
    6. $53B France
    7. $48B Japan
    8. $45B India
    9. $44B Germany

    The "next eight nations combined" add up to $532 billion annual military expenditures. Compare that to the U.S.'s annual total of $581 billion, and Pres. Obama is accurate. (Sen. Rand Paul said in 2015 the same statement about "the next ten countries combined," and we rated his statement "loosely accurate", but Obama could have gone up to "the next nine nations combined" adding in South Korea's $34B). Obama's point was the same as Paul's: the U.S. has by far the strongest military on earth, and we need not increase military spending to maintain our military dominance.

    Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2016 State of the Union: OnTheIssues FactCheck

    Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Jan 12, 2016
    Talk of economic decline & military weakness is just hot air

    A big question that we have to answer together is how to keep America safe and strong without either isolating ourselves or trying to nation- build everywhere there's a problem. All the talk of America's economic decline is political hot air. Well, so is all the rhetoric you hear about our enemies getting stronger and America getting weaker. Let me tell you something. The United States is the most powerful nation on Earth, period. Period. It's not even close. We spend more on our military than the next eight nations combined. Our troops are the finest fighting force in the history of the world.

    No nation attacks us directly or our allies because they know that's the path to ruin. Surveys show our standing around the world is higher than when I was elected to this office, and when it comes to every important international issue, people of the world do not look to Beijing or Moscow to lead. They call us. So I think it's useful to level set here, because when we don't, we don't make good decisions.

    Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2016 State of the Union address

    Hillary Clinton on Homeland Security : Nov 14, 2015
    Adversaries of the future: terrorists as well as drone subs

    Sen. SANDERS: We're spending over $600 billion a year on the military and yet, significantly less than 10% of that money is used to be fighting international terrorism.

    Gov. O'MALLEY: This is a new era of conflict where traditional ways of huge standing armies do not serve our purposes as well as special ops, better intelligence and being more proactive.

    Secretary CLINTON: We do have to take a hard look at the defense budget and we do have to figure out how we get ready to fight the adversaries of the future, not the past. But we have to also be very clear that we do have some continuing challenges. We've got challenges in the South China Sea because of what China is doing in building up military installations. We have problems with Russia: they allowed a TV camera to see the plans for a drone submarine that could carry a tactical nuclear weapon. So we've got to look at the full range and then come to some smart decisions about having more streamlined and focused approach.

    Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: 2015 CBS Democratic primary debate in Iowa

    Bernie Sanders on Homeland Security : Nov 14, 2015
    We spend billions on nuclear weapons & only 10% on terrorism

    Sen. SANDERS: This nation is the most powerful military in the world. We're spending over $600 billion a year on the military and yet, significantly less than 10% of that money is used to be fighting international terrorism. We are spending hundreds of billions of dollars maintaining 5,000 nuclear weapons. I think we need major reform in the military, making it more cost effective, but also focusing on the real crisis that faces us. The Cold War is over. And our focus has got to be on intelligence, increased manpower, fighting international targets.

    Gov. O'MALLEY: The nature of warfare has changed. This is a new era of conflict where traditional ways of huge standing armies do not serve our purposes as well as special ops & better intelligence.

    Secretary CLINTON: We do have to take a hard look at the defense budget and we do have to figure out how we get ready to fight the adversaries of the future, not the past. But we have to also be very clear that we do have some continuing challenges.

    Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: 2015 CBS Democratic primary debate in Iowa

    Donald Trump on Homeland Security : Nov 3, 2015
    VA is one of the most incompetently-run agencies

    The Department of Veterans Affairs ( VA) is probably the most incompetently run agency in the United States government. And that's saying something. The problem is that there are too many political people involved within its operation.

    The taxpayers pay more than $150 billion a year for the VA, and what do we get for that? Right now, the VA is being run by people who don't know what they're doing. They're getting more money from the government than ever before and yet the care gets worse. The list of men and women waiting for care is growing and their wait times are longer. How can the VA possibly be so inefficient? We need to put people in charge who know how to run big operations. We have to get the best managers and give them the power, the money, and the tools to get the job done. We owe our veterans nothing less.

    Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Crippled America, by Donald Trump, p.106-7

    Bernie Sanders on Homeland Security : Oct 13, 2015
    I pushed bill for $15B for veterans' healthcare services

    What we did is pass a $15 billion dollar piece of legislation which brought in many new doctors and nurses into the V.A. so that veterans could get health care when they needed it, and not be on long waiting lines. The other part of that legislation said that if a veteran is living more than 40 miles away from a V.A. facility, that veteran could get health care from the community health center or the private sector.
    Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: 2015 CNN Democratic primary debate in Las Vegas

    John Kasich on Homeland Security : Sep 20, 2015
    Expand voucher program for veterans' healthcare

    Q: Dr. Ben Carson has called for essentially closing the VA and folding in most health care for veterans into the Pentagon. Do you think that plan would work? What would you do?

    A: I first of all think that we need to expand the voucher program so a veteran can get the health care they need as soon as they can possibly get it and should not be just limited to the VA hospitals. Secondly, my sense is you're going to have to decentralize the VA.

    Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: CNN SOTU 2015 interview series: 2016 presidential hopefuls

    Donald Trump on Homeland Security : Sep 20, 2015
    Fix veteran's hospitals, and pay private doctors for them

    Q: You said that you would build more hospitals for veterans--is there anything else you would do?

    A: One of the things I would do is fix the hospitals. What I'm going to do is make sure that they will be able to go out and use private doctors and we will pay the private doctors. We're going to do a bit of a free market thing so that veterans can get immediate service and good treatment.

    Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: CNN SOTU 2015 interview series: 2016 presidential hopefuls

    John Kasich on War & Peace : Sep 13, 2015
    I'm a "cheap hawk": Cut Pentagon waste, but not spending

    Q: On defense spending, You say there are 900,000 people helping run the Pentagon who have no direct line authority, but on the other hand, you say you'd like to see an end to spending caps on Pentagon spending. Those two seem in contradiction.

    KASICH: I think we absolutely have to spend more on defense. It's one of the essential purposes of the federal government. But I have served on defense for 18 years and being able to witness the waste, the duplication, the red tape, the slowdown, we don't want to spend money there that goes in the bureaucracy and delay that could go into building a stronger defense. There's no inconsistency there: reform the Pentagon, strengthen the military. That's why I call myself the cheap hawk.

    Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: Fox News Sunday 2015 coverage of 2016 presidential hopefuls

    Bernie Sanders on Homeland Security : Sep 5, 2015
    Costs of endless war detract from citizens' well-being

    Q: What does Bernie believe about current levels of defense spending?

    A: While Bernie appreciates a strong defense system, he has also views the cost of endless wars and tremendous peacetime defense spending as detracting from facing "some of the most pressing economic issues affecting the well-being of ordinary Americans." Bernie firmly rejects any increase to defense spending at the cost of cuts to domestic social spending.

    Q: Why is Bernie so concerned with the defense budget?

    A: Bernie sees a lack of accountability on defense spending. Explaining his "no" vote on the 2015 National Defense Authorization Act, which set the military's budget at $560 billion, Bernie expressed concern that "the military is unable to even account for how it spends all of its money." Bernie also voted against the 2012 and 2013 defense authorization bills, voicing alarm at the size of the defense budget despite the US having withdrawn all military members from Iraq.

    Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: 2016 grassroots campaign website FeelTheBern.org, "Issues"

    Amy Klobuchar on Homeland Security : Aug 24, 2015
    Offer troops care for traumatic brain injury

    [After my 2007 visit to Iraq, I said in a national speech]: "Between the Gulf War in the early 1990s and our invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan, our country had spawned a generation of young veterans with unique needs. All too often they had traumatic brain injuries (the signature injury coming out of these wars) or mental health issues or a lack of gainful employment when they returned home. As I said at dozens of deployment and welcome home ceremonies, we owed it to our troops to do the right thing--despite major disagreements about the policy in Iraq, our nation simply could not make the same mistake that so many made during the war in Vietnam. This time, we would agree to disagree about the war but still respect and support the warriors. When our troops signed up to serve our country there wasn't a waiting line, and when they come home to our country and they need a job or a house or health care or an education, there should never be a waiting line in the United States of America.
    Click for Amy Klobuchar on other issues.   Source: The Senator Next Door, by Amy Klobuchar, p.233-4

    Donald Trump on Homeland Security : Jun 16, 2015
    Increased Veterans Day parade audience from 100 to 1 million

    Trump has long been a devoted supporter of veteran causes. In 1995, the fiftieth anniversary of World War II, only 100 spectators watched New York City's Veteran Day Parade. It was an insult to all veterans. Approached by Mayor Rudy Giuliani and the chief of New York City's FBI office, Trump agreed to lead as Grand Marshall a second parade later that year. Mr. Trump made a $1 million matching donation to finance the Nation's Day Parade. On Saturday, November 11th, over 1.4 million watched as Trump marched down Fifth Avenue with more than 25,000 veterans, some dressed in their vintage uniforms. A month later, Trump was honored in the Pentagon during a lunch with the Secretary of Defense and the entire Joint Chiefs of Staff.
    Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: 2016 presidential campaign website, DonaldJTrump.com

    Lincoln Chafee on War & Peace : Jun 4, 2015
    Averse to foreign entanglements, including Iraq

    Aversion to Foreign Entanglements: Only 23 of 100 Senators saw the folly of allowing Bush/Cheney to invade Iraq. I am very proud to be one of the 23.

    The tragedies of the Iraq War are manifold; lost and injured lives, hundreds of billions of squandered tax dollars, the difficulty of providing just and proper care for our brave veterans, but maybe the most tragic, the loss of American credibility. I commit to the repair needed to all the harm done. Our credibility will be restored when we respect our world partners and truly listen when they speak. In a world of nuclear weapons, the United States must make international decisions with brains and not biceps.

    Click for Lincoln Chafee on other issues.   Source: 2016 presidential campaign website Chafee2016.com

    Bernie Sanders on Homeland Security : Apr 30, 2015
    Cut defense by $18B to pay for 55% of all college tuition

    If the federal government were to invest $18 billion a year, with a dollar-for-dollar match from state governments, we would slash college tuition in the United States by more than half. Many of my colleagues in Washington would look at that number-- $18 billion a year--and tell you that we can't afford to make that kind of investment in our nation's young people. To put it simply, they are wrong. In the budget proposal President Obama released two weeks ago, he requested $561 billion for the Department of Defense--$38 billion over budget caps that are currently in place. If we were to reduce the President's proposed increase in military spending by less than half, and instead invest that money in educational opportunities for today's college students, we could cut tuition by 55%. So I challenge all of you. ask yourselves, where should our priorities lie?
    Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: Forbes Magazine on 2016 hopefuls: 2015 speech at U. Iowa

    Bernie Sanders on Homeland Security : Apr 19, 2015
    We need a strong military, but stop wasting tens of billions

    Q: You want a 50% cut in military spending at a time when ISIS and al Qaeda are on the march--

    SANDERS: What I do believe is that there is enormous waste in military. The Department of Defense can't even audit itself--massive cost overruns. Of course, ISIS is a terrible organization that has to be defeated. And, of course, we need a strong military. But just as with every other agency of government, you know what, the military also has got to get rid of waste and fraud and cost overruns. So, I want a strong military. But I do not believe, among other things, that without an audit, we should be throwing tens of billions of dollars more into the Department of Defense.

    Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: Fox News Sunday 2015 coverage of 2016 presidential hopefuls

    Mike Pence on Homeland Security : Feb 28, 2015
    The time has come to dramatically increase defense spending

    Pence said that the 2016 election could turn on foreign policy thanks to the missteps of the Obama administration, and called on conservatives to embrace "America's role as leader of the free world."

    "I believe the time has come to dramatically increase defense spending to confront the unknowable and knowable threats," Pence said. "Without rebuilding our military, no strategy or innovation, no matter how brilliant, will be sufficient to protect the American people and the sovereignty of the US.

    Click for Mike Pence on other issues.   Source: Washington Times on 2015 Conservative Political Action Conf.

    Arvin Vohra on Homeland Security : Jan 20, 2015
    Intelligently rethink overall military spending

    Libertarian Party vice-chair Arvin Vohra calls Obama out on ignoring here the expensive and destructive Drug War, and his hypocrisy on Internet informational privacy while running, and defending, a universal surveillance state, and his refusal to intelligently rethink overall military spending and postures while talking up a supposedly more intelligent form of constant foreign military intervention.
    Click for Arvin Vohra on other issues.   Source: Reason Mag.: Libertarian response to 2015 State of the Union

    Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Jan 20, 2015
    Finish the job: it's time to close Gitmo

    As Americans, we have a profound commitment to justice--so it makes no sense to spend three million dollars per prisoner to keep open a prison that the world condemns and terrorists use to recruit. Since I've been President, we've worked responsibly to cut the population of GTMO in half. Now it's time to finish the job. And I will not relent in my determination to shut it down. It's not who we are.
    Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2015 State of the Union address

    Howard Schultz on Homeland Security : Nov 9, 2014
    Volunteer army means 98% of us have no skin in the game

    Q: You wrote a book, "For Love of Country," about these veterans that are coming home. There's been a lot of talk about trying to help them get back into civilian life. What is the one thing that you think the public needs to understand about helping these folks back into civilian life?

    HOWARD SCHULTZ: Two and a half million extraordinary young men and women have served for the last ten, 15 years in an all-volunteer service. As a result of that, most of America, 98% have not had real skin in the game. We need to have a conversation, be empathetic, be understanding, and do everything we possibly can across the country, in rural America and every town, to hire a veteran.

    Click for Howard Schultz on other issues.   Source: Meet the Press 2014 interview by Chuck Todd

    Kirsten Gillibrand on Homeland Security : Sep 9, 2014
    Address backlog of veterans' claims & chronic underfunding

    Once, a veteran who lost a limb in Vietnam told me, "When I strap on my leg, I strap on my patriotism. Why isn't the VA supporting me?" Those two sentences moved my office to work until we got him $60,000 in benefits and back pay. This story also opened my eyes to the backlog of veteran's claims caused by the chronic underfunding of the Veterans Administration.
    Click for Kirsten Gillibrand on other issues.   Source: Off the Sidelines, by Kirsten Gillibrand, p. 60

    Kirsten Gillibrand on Homeland Security : Sep 9, 2014
    Dont-Ask-Dont-Tell caused 13,000 qualified soldiers to leave

    Arguments against the Don't Ask, Don't Tell policy could be found everywhere. In addition to being morally outrageous and corrosive, Don't Ask, Don't Tell undermined military readiness. Since 1994, when the law was first implemented, approximately 13,000 well-trained military personnel had been discharged from the U.S. military for being gay. More than 2,000 of those people were experts in mission-critical disciplines. The military lost close to 10 percent of it's foreign-language speakers. The cost of implementing the policy, from 1994 to 2003--including recruitment, retraining, and separation travel--was somewhere between $190 million to $360 million. I didn't understand how a reasonable person could think that such money would not have been better spent on equipment, mental or physical health services... almost anything.
    Click for Kirsten Gillibrand on other issues.   Source: Off the Sidelines, by Kirsten Gillibrand, p.111

    Seth Moulton on Homeland Security : Sep 1, 2014
    Better funding and services for veterans

    Congress is failing our veterans. As a veteran myself, I see it firsthand. We have never had fewer veterans in Congress in our nation's history, so it's not surprising that so few Members of Congress understand the urgency of the problem. There are three things Congress can do to improve how we treat our veterans today:
    1. Improve VA health care quality
    2. Properly fund the VA to eliminate the claims backlog
    3. Expand educational opportunities in the GI Bill.
    Click for Seth Moulton on other issues.   Source: 2014 House campaign website, SethMoulton.com

    Hillary Clinton on Homeland Security : May 30, 2014
    Benghazi security was simply inadequate in a dangerous city

    On the Accountability Review Board investigation into the Benghazi attacks: Clinton writes that the security upgrades to the Benghazi compound were "simply inadequate in an increasingly dangerous city." She notes that Benghazi compound personnel felt their requests for additional security were not given adequate weight by the US Embassy in Tripoli, a point Republicans have argued does not absolve Clinton since those officials report to her. Clinton reiterates that she never saw cables requesting additional security. The cables were addressed to her as a "procedural quirk" given her position, but didn't actually land on her desk, she writes: "That's not how it works. It shouldn't. And it didn't."

    On the claim that the investigation of the attack was rigged since Clinton appointed some of the Board members and she was not interviewed, she writes that they "had unfettered access to anyone and anything they thought relevant to their investigation, including me if they had chosen to do so."

    Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: Hard Choices, by Hillary Clinton, Politico.com excerpts

    Bernie Sanders on Homeland Security : May 25, 2014
    V.A. doesn't have resources to accommodate 2 million vets

    Q: All of a sudden we're learning of these wait times, of veterans who are dying while waiting.

    SANDERS: Clearly, there are incompetent administrators. But I think one point that sometimes gets lost in the shuffle. If you speak to veterans organizations, they will tell you that, by and large, the quality of care that veterans receive in VA hospitals around this country is good to excellent.

    Q: Sure, but, if you can't get in, it doesn't do any good that it's great care.

    SANDERS: That is quite right. The VA has established a self-imposed goal of getting people into the system in 14 days. That's pretty ambitious. That's more ambitious in general than the private sector. And I think there are places around the country where they simply do not have the resources to accommodate the fact that two million more people have come into the system in recent years. And I think some people may be cooking the books to make it look like they're accommodating people in 14 days.

    Click for Bernie Sanders on other issues.   Source: CNN SOTU 2014 interview series: 2016 presidential hopefuls

    Elizabeth Warren on Homeland Security : Apr 22, 2014
    Address predatory lending targeting young military enlistees

    [I wanted to address] the vulnerability of the youngest in service, kids fresh out of high school who were picking up the first regular paychecks in their lives. Young soldiers became targets for a number of aggressive scams. Once the young soldiers arrived on base, they ran a gauntlet of pretty young women to flirt and sell them on installment loans that charged 100% interest or more. Just sign here, sweetie.

    A bad debt could ruin not just a service member's credit score, but also the person's career. Not paying a debt is deemed "dishonorable conduct," a black mark that can cause soldiers to lose out on security clearance. In 2006, the Department of Defense studied predatory lending that targeted service members and concluded that such lending "undermines military readiness." The scam artists and predatory lenders who targeted our men and women in uniform were a national disgrace. The consumer agency needed to make fixing this problem a priority.

    Click for Elizabeth Warren on other issues.   Source: A Fighting Chance, by Elizabeth Warren, p.189-91

    Cory Booker on Homeland Security : Nov 3, 2013
    Irresponsible to spend on irrelevant weapon systems

    For too long, Congress has been spending money on weapons our military doesn't want, weapons envisioned for wars never fought against enemies that no longer exist. That doesn't make us any safer--in fact, it makes us less safe by siphoning funds away from essential training and spending on relevant weapons systems. This irresponsible spending is even less acceptable at a time when sequestration is forcing across-the-board cuts--to military priorities essential and superfluous alike.
    Click for Cory Booker on other issues.   Source: 2013-2014 New Jersey Senate campaign web CoryBooker.com

    Joe Biden on War & Peace : Feb 2, 2013
    Intel support against extremism in Mali and North Africa

    Today, across North Africa and in parts of the Middle East, extremists are seeking to exploit the following: increasingly porous borders; a broad swath of ungoverned territory; readily available weapons; new governments that lack the capacity to contend with extremism; a swelling generation of disaffected young people.

    This is not a call to spend tens of billions of dollars and deploy thousands and tens of thousands of boots on the ground, as once occurred. It requires a more integrated strategy, a more coordinated strategy.

    It will take a comprehensive approach--employing the full range of the tools at our disposal--including our militaries. That's why the US applauds and stands with France and other partners in Mali, and why we are providing intelligence support, transportation for the French and African troops and refueling capability for French aircraft. The fight against AQIM may be far from America's borders, but it is fundamentally in America's interest.

    Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: Speech at the Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany

    Steve Bullock on Homeland Security : Jan 30, 2013
    Wrap-around services to reintegrate heroes to civilian life

    This morning, I went to the airport and welcomed home 45 soldiers from the Montana National Guard who had just spent a year in Afghanistan. I told them I would ensure that we live up to the promise all of us made the day they signed up.

    That's why I asked this Legislature to invest in our university system and make certain that we are providing the services and the space to meet veterans' needs-- the wrap-around services that will reintegrate these heroes back into civilian life and on our college campuses. When I got back from the airport, I found out that, while I was gone, a legislative committee cut the funding for these critical services for returning vets. I urge you to restore these funds, live up to the promises we've made and welcome these warriors home with more than just words.

    Click for Steve Bullock on other issues.   Source: 2013 State of the State Address to Montana legislature

    John Hickenlooper on Homeland Security : Jan 10, 2013
    Make hiring veterans a priority

    Make hiring veterans a priority Let's not forget our veterans and those on active duty. This week, we welcomed home 208 of our National Guard men and women.
    Click for John Hickenlooper on other issues.   Source: 2013 Colorado State of the State address

    Eric Swalwell on Homeland Security : Nov 6, 2012
    More benefits for veterans' valiant sacrifices

    The valiant sacrifices made by our veterans, and their families, on behalf of our county need to be remembered and rewarded; they have made great sacrifices so we can enjoy the freedoms we take for granted. There are many proposals in Congress to reduce their benefits or to require veterans to pay more for the benefits we have promised them for their service to our Country. I do not support reducing benefits that have already been promised to current veterans and active duty military.

    I convened a roundtable discussion with area veterans to learn how we can best support them upon their end of military service. I pledged to continue fighting to keep the Livermore VA Hospital open in some fashion, to serve local Vets.

    Veterans are concerned about their ability to hold meaningful jobs. We must help veterans find job opportunities once they complete their service and I support new tax credits to encourage businesses to hire unemployed and disabled veterans.

    Click for Eric Swalwell on other issues.   Source: 2012 House campaign website, swalwellforcongress.com

    Tulsi Gabbard on War & Peace : Nov 6, 2012
    End our involvement in Afghanistan

    As a war veteran who knows the cost of war, I will continue to call for an end to our involvement in Afghanistan. Now is the time to withdraw our troops as quickly and safely as possible. Our troops have served this nation honorably and sacrificed tremendously. We have decimated Al Qaeda in Afghanistan, we have killed Osama bin Laden, and we have provided the Afghan people and government with the tools they need to succeed. In order for Afghanistan to achieve stability and peace, the Afghan people must stand up and determine the direction of their future. We must take the $2.5 billion a week we are pouring into Afghanistan to prop up a corrupt government and invest those resources in rebuilding our own economy here at home.
    Click for Tulsi Gabbard on other issues.   Source: 2012 House campaign website, votetulsi.com, "Issues"

    Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Oct 22, 2012
    Don't give military money that they're not asking for

    Q: Governor, you say you want a bigger military. Where are you going to get the money?

    ROMNEY: First of all, we're going to cut about 5% of the discretionary budget excluding military.

    Q: Can you do this without driving us deeper into debt?

    OBAMA: Gov. Romney's called for $5 trillion of tax cuts that he says he's going to pay for by closing deductions. He then wants to spend another $2 trillion on military spending that our military's not asking for. Now, keep in mind that our military spending has gone up every single year that I've been in office. We spend more on our military than the next 10 countries combined--China, Russia, France, the United Kingdom, you name it, next 10. And what I did was work with our Joint Chiefs of Staff to think about what are we going to need in the future to make sure that we are safe? And that's the budget that we've put forward. But what you can't do is spend $2 trillion in additional military spending that the military is not asking for.

    Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Third Obama-Romney 2012 Presidential debate

    Joe Biden on Homeland Security : Oct 11, 2012
    Special Forces instead of M1 tanks

    Q: How you do the budget math and have this increase in defense spending?

    RYAN: You don't cut defense by a trillion dollars.

    BIDEN: Who's cutting it by a trillion?

    RYAN: We're going to cut 80,000 soldiers, 20,000 Marines, 120 cargo planes. We're going to push the Joint Strike Fighter out. We're cutting missile defense. If these cuts go through, our Navy will be the smallest it has been since before World War I. This invites weakness.

    BIDEN: Look, we don't cut it. The military says, we need a smaller, leaner Army. We need more special forces. We don't need more M1 tanks. What we need is more UAVs [unmanned aerial vehicles, commonly called "drones"]. That was the decision of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, recommended to us and agreed to by the president.

    Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: 2012 Vice Presidential debate

    Elizabeth Warren on Homeland Security : Oct 11, 2012
    Reduce size of standing army to reduce deficit

    Warren portrayed herself as someone who was being honest and realistic when she said she would "raise revenues," a euphemism for taxes, and would even cut the military budget and redirect spending to education programs and improvements in the nation's infrastructure.

    Only late in the debate did Warren try to explain why and how she would cut the military budget. She said that Brown's determination not to raise taxes meant that the budget would not be balanced and the deficit would not be reduced, which would lead to across-the-board cuts in all agencies. She would rather make planned cuts, such as by reducing the size of the standing army, she said, than allow across-the-board cuts that could hurt needed programs.

    Click for Elizabeth Warren on other issues.   Source: N.Y. Times on 2012 Mass. Senate debates

    Joe Biden on Homeland Security : Oct 11, 2012
    Caring for veterans is our only sacred obligation

    BIDEN: We only have one truly sacred obligation as a government. That's to equip those we send into harm's way and care for those who come home. That's the only sacred obligation we have. Everything else falls behind that. [Veterans] should be honored; not be thrown into a category of the 47% who don't pay their taxes.
    Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: 2012 Vice Presidential debate

    Deval Patrick on Homeland Security : Jan 23, 2012
    Massachusetts leads the nation in veterans benefits

    Like every state, we cut spending and headcount, and slimmed down programs or eliminated some. But we also chose to invest in education, in health care and in job creation--because we all know that educating our kids, having health care you can depend on, and a good job is the path to a better future.And it's also why we have not only closed our budget gaps, eliminated our structural deficit, and achieved the highest bond rating in our history, but made the kinds of meaningful reforms in the pension system, in municipal health benefits, in our schools, in our transportation and so much more that had eluded our predecessors for a long, long time. None of this is happening by accident.
    Click for Deval Patrick on other issues.   Source: MA 2012 State of the State Address

    Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Jan 11, 2012
    Reduce defense spending 1% in 2013; add 2% per year after

    According to the first details of the Obama administration's fiscal 2013 defense budget, defense spending in 2013 would be reduced 1% from this year's initial $525 billion request before growing annually 1.8% in 2014, 2.3% in 2015, 1.9% in 2016, and 2.2% in 2017.

    The administration plans $82 billion in funding for the Afghanistan and Iraq wars for 2013, according to OMB. The basic defense-only "topline" numbers are currently projected at: $524 billion in 2013; and $533 billion in 2014; $546 billion in 2015; $556 billion in 2016; and $568 billion in 2017. The percentage increases are expressed in "nominal growth," not adjusted for inflation.

    The 2012-2021 defense plan calls for $5.652 trillion in spending. OMB calculated that the total Budget Control Act- mandated defense cut over those years is $488 billion--or about an 8.5% total decrease.

    Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Tony Capaccio in Bloomberg News, "First Budget Numbers"

    Joe Biden on War & Peace : Dec 13, 2011
    We shared responsibility to bring democracy to Libya

    The Iraq War really spiraled out of control pretty quickly. One of the lessons we`ve learned is that you can go into any dictatorship and try to impose democracy, but it`s going to take you $1 trillion, a decade, and you`re going to have to make a judgment whether or not you`d better spend your time and effort doing something else to make the world safer.

    I would give Libya as an example. It was clear that Moammar Gadhafi was really not a good guy at all. But what did the president do? We spent several billion dollars, but we didn`t lose one American life. We didn`t put one boot on the ground. And we had a shared responsibility with the rest of the world, including Arab nations as well as NATO to deal with that issue.

    And now, there`s a shared responsibility to the world to help them establish a democracy. That`s very different than going it alone. I hope we`ve learned the lesson that, unless our immediate vital national interest is at stake, going it alone should be the last option.

    Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: MSNBC's "The Rachel Maddow Show" on 2012 election

    Donald Trump on Homeland Security : Dec 5, 2011
    All freedoms flow from national security

    Obama's recent decision to gut the U.S. military by cutting $400 billion from our defense budget, a figure more than double what then-Secretary of Defense Robert Gates identified as being prudent. Now here's Obama, a guy who never met a spending bill h doesn't love. But when it comes to funding our troops and giving them the equipment, training, and support they need, Obama is MIA.

    The reason conservatives support a strong and well-funded military is because they know that all freedoms flow from national security. That's why we need a new president. It's also why we need to get tough in foreign policy to deal with the threats and challenges America faces from rival and enemy nations.

    Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Time to Get Tough, by Donald Trump, p. 90-91

    Donald Trump on War & Peace : Dec 5, 2011
    Iraq should pick up the tab for their own liberation

    When you do someone a favor, they say thank you. When you give someone a loan, they pay you back. And when a nation like the US sacrifices thousands of lives of its own young servicemen and women and more than a trillion dollars to bring freedom to the people of Iraq, the least the Iraqis should do is pick up the tab for their own liberation.

    How much is it worth to them to be rid of the bloodthirsty dictatorship of Saddam Hussein and to have gained a democracy? In reality, that's a priceless gift. When I say they should pay us back, I'm not even talking about cash out of their pockets. All I'm asking is that they give us, temporarily, a few flows of oil--enough to help pay us back and help take care of the tens of thousands of families and children whose brave loved ones died or were injured while securing Iraqi freedom.

    But does Iraq do that? No. In fact, they've made it clear they have no intention of ever doing so. Ever. The ingratitude of Iraq's leadership is breathtaking.

    Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Time to Get Tough, by Donald Trump, p. 9-10

    Joe Walsh on Homeland Security : Jul 8, 2011
    Cut $8.9B from defense bill, and supported 3% more

    The FY12 Department of Defense Appropriations bill funds the Department of Defense and represents a cut of $8.9 billion from the President's budget request.

    "Today I was proud to vote to ensure that our troops have the resources they need to defend American families and our great nation. This bill is also an important step in bringing Washington's spending problem under control. For the first time in 20 years, the House has passed a Department of Defense Appropriations bill that is significantly lower than the President's budget request. While I unconditionally support our troops, I thought it was imperative to cut some of the bloat out of the President's request. In fact, during the amendment process I also supported several amendments that would have made further cuts to defense spending, including one that would have made an additional 3% cut across the board. Unfortunately, these amendments did not pass, but I will continue to support hard spending cuts and fiscal responsibility."

    Click for Joe Walsh on other issues.   Source: 2011 House press release by 2020 presidential hopefuls

    Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Jun 1, 2010
    OpEd: On track to spend most on military since WWII

    For 2008, the US accounted for over 40% of global military expenses, eight times as much as its nearest rival, China. The US is of course alone in having a vast network of military bases around the world and a global surveillance and control system, and in regularly invading other countries (with impunity, given its power). From 1999 to 2008, global military spending increased 45%, with the US accounting for 58% of the total.

    Obama is on track to spend more on defense, in real dollars, than any other president in one term of office since World War II, and that's not counting the additional $130 billion the administration is requesting to find the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan next year, with even more war spending slated for future years. In January 2010, Congress passed his Pentagon budget with supplemental funding for Afghanistan pending. The $708.3 billion budget (with another $33 billion expected for Afghanistan) is not only a record, but also amounts to half the deficit.

    Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Hopes and Prospects, by Noam Chomsky, p. 63-64

    Joe Sestak on Homeland Security : May 1, 2010
    2005 Navy reassignment: personnel change or morale issue?

    Specter opened the debate demanding an apology for a Sestak ad in which a veteran asks Specter not to "lie" about Sestak's Navy record, and he repeatedly asked Sestak to release his service records to explain a 2005 reassignment by the Navy.

    Sestak ignored the requests, called his service honorable and aggressively worked to tie Specter to the policies of former Pres. Bush. "There is no record except the Republican record for Arlen Specter," Sestak said.

    Specter countered that he had stood with Democrats on their top priorities, even during his 28 years as a Republican. Specter switched parties last year.

    Sestak has said he was reassigned in 2005 because the newly appointed chief naval officer wanted his own team in charge. Specter has cited a report in the Navy Times that said Sestak was reassigned from his job as deputy chief of naval operations for creating a poor command climate--a term for morale.

    Click for Joe Sestak on other issues.   Source: Lehigh Valley Live coverage of 2010 PA Senate debate

    Donald Trump on Homeland Security : Apr 27, 2010
    Business students should read Sun Tzu's "The Art of War"

    Back in school, I spent time studying wars and their impact on where we are today in civilization. That's a big assignment and I'm by no means an expert, but it is worth spending some time to know how and why we are where we are today.

    One book that I would suggest to you, because it is valuable for business and managerial strategies, is "The Art of War" by Sun Tzu. This was apparently written in the sixth century BC and is a study of military strategy. It may sound like an unusual business school recommendation, but believe me, it isn't. It's valuable and worth your time.

    By comparison, another famed book is Machiavelli's The Prince, which is more about political conflict and qualities necessary for leadership than war or business, but its emphasis on power becomes a negative factor. Ethics and integrity seem to get lost somewhere in the shuffle, and therefore the word Machiavellian has become a pejorative term. It's a better use of your time to read "The Art of War."

    Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: Think Like a Champion, by Donald Trump, p. 33

    Jesse Ventura on Homeland Security : Mar 9, 2010
    Federal surveillance is a waste of taxpayer dollars

    Let's focus on rethinking the meaning of surveillance. Certainly in the case of Malcolm X, as well as Dr. King, being shadowed by government agencies seemed to lead inevitably to their death. There is too much secrecy in our government, and surveillance today is even more widespread that it was then, at a considerable waste of taxpayer dollars. Let's also teach our young people that a willingness to change your attitude, as Malcolm X was willing to do, is a mark not of weakness but sometimes of greatnes
    Click for Jesse Ventura on other issues.   Source: American Conspiracies, by Jesse Ventura, p. 52

    Joe Biden on War & Peace : Aug 4, 2009
    2007: Supported funding Iraq War, against Obama

    In May 2007, the Senate voted on a $120 billion spending bill that included $100 billion for Iraq and Afghanistan. Chris Dodd said he would oppose the spending bill. Joe Biden, chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, declared he would vote for it.

    Obama said, "I opposed this war in 2002 precisely because I feared it would lead us to the open-ended occupation in which we find ourselves today. We should not give the president a blank check to continue down this same, disastrous path." Just fourteen senators opposed the measure.

    Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: The Battle for America 2008, by Balz & Johnson, p. 80-81

    Joe Biden on Homeland Security : Oct 2, 2008
    We spend same in 3 weeks in Iraq as 7 years in Afghanistan

    PALIN: The counterinsurgency strategy--clearing, holding, rebuilding, the civil society and the infrastructure--can work in Afghanistan.

    BIDEN: While Barack & I have been calling for more money & more troops in Afghanistan, McCain was saying two years ago, “The reason we don’t read about Afghanistan anymore in the paper, it’s succeeded.” We spend in three weeks on combat missions in Iraq, more than we spent in the entire time we have been in Afghanistan. That will change in an Obama administration.

    Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: 2008 Vice Presidential debate against Gov. Sarah Palin

    Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Aug 1, 2008
    Goal is a world without nuclear weapons

    Without any introduction, Obama begins, "I am the only major candidate to oppose this war from the beginning and, as president, I will end it.

    "Second," he continues, "I will cut tens of billions of dollars in wasteful spending. I will cut investments in unproven missile defense systems. I will not weaponize space. I will slow our development of future combat systems and I will institute an independent defense priorities board to ensure that the quadrennial defense review is not used to justify unnecessary spending.

    "Third," he says, without pausing, "I will set a goal of a world without nuclear weapons. To seek that goal, I will not develop new nuclear weapons. I will seek a ban on the production of fissile materials. And I will negotiate with Russia to take ICBMs off hair-trigger alert and to achieve deep cuts in our nuclear arsenals."

    Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Obama Nation, by Jerome Corsi, p. 1-2

    Mike Gravel on Homeland Security : May 2, 2008
    President’s job since WWII is pitchman for war industry

    The president’s chief job since the end of WWII is, above all, pitchman for the war industries. WWI meant convincing the American people to enter an overseas conflict that didn’t directly threaten them. So a manageable threat had to be exaggerated. After winning, the US military was demobilized; defense spending shrunk and the private armaments industry contracted.

    WWII changed that. The military-industrial relationship was formalized and the economy became dependent on it. By 1949 there was a peacetime draft, a new Defense Department, a CIA and a National Security Council coordinating the national security state. Except, there was no war. So tension with Russia was exalted into a global struggle against a highly embellishe Communist “threat.” We were bathed in irrational fear during the entire Cold War to keep the military factories--and our irrational insecurities--humming. And now the phantom peril has seamlessly merged into the War on Terror.

    Click for Mike Gravel on other issues.   Source: A Political Odyssey, by Mike Gravel, p. 22

    Mike Gravel on War & Peace : May 2, 2008
    Neocons plotted since 1991 to overthrow Saddam

    Clinton’s containment policy with Iraq angered the neo-conservatives. Bush I’s defense secretary, Dick Cheney, produced a 46-page policy report saying that the US’s post-Cold War mission was to ensure no rival anywhere could challenge America’s undispute supremacy.

    Four years later, Cheney, Rumsfeld, and 23 other neo-cons founded a group called the Project for a New American Century (PNAC). They advocated increased defense spending (what else?) to carry out the plan. In 1998, several PNAC members wrot an open letter to Clinton calling on him to launch a preemptive military attack against Iraq to stop it using “weapons of mass destruction.” They concluded, “only a determined program to change the regime in Baghdad will bring the Iraqi crisis to a satisfactory conclusion.”

    In 2000 the PNAC produced a similar report, acknowledging that “the process of transformation” toward US world domination “is likely to be a long one, absent some catastrophic and catalyzing event like a new Pearl Harbor.”

    Click for Mike Gravel on other issues.   Source: A Political Odyssey, by Mike Gravel, p.217-218

    Lincoln Chafee on War & Peace : Apr 1, 2008
    2002: War authorization just ratchets up the hatred

    In October of 2002, how could any Republican senator vote to send his country over the precipice again based on party loyalty? How could any Democratic senator follow suit out of political cowardice? When the president declared that Saddam was an imminent threat to America from 7,000 miles away, veteran lawmakers in both parties failed to fight back. They let the administration go unchallenged when it sent up witnesses who did their best to get us into the war the president wanted.

    On October 9, roughly 36 hours before the vote, I went to the Senate floor to say that the war authorization would serve those who believe in "ratcheting up the hatred."

    In the end, even a majority of Senate Democrats voted for war. Only 23 senators voted to check a reckless president. I was the lone Republican among them.

    Click for Lincoln Chafee on other issues.   Source: Against the Tide, by Sen. Lincoln Chafee, p. 91-92

    Jesse Ventura on War & Peace : Apr 1, 2008
    Iraq war drains resources from social programs

    Prior to invading, Donald Rumsfeld said that Iraq's oil would pay for everything. So much for that big idea.

    The fact is, this war is not only draining America's resources, it's likely to eventually bankrupt us. And who is paying the biggest price? When you realize that the new Bush budget also cuts $66 billion out of Medicare payments to the elderly over the next 5 years, and another $12 billion out of Medicaid for the poor, it's kind of a no-brainer. The NY Times recently noted that, for what the war is costing, we could've instituted universal health care, provided nursery school education for every 3- and 4-year-old, and immunized kids around the world against numerous diseases--and still had half the money left over.

    At the same time, shortly before we turned over supposed control to the Iraqis, the US Federal Reserve sent over, on military aircraft, the biggest cash shipment it's ever made--more than $4 billion, amounting to 363 tons of dollars on these huge pallets.

    Click for Jesse Ventura on other issues.   Source: Don`t Start the Revolution, by Jesse Ventura, p.263

    Jesse Ventura on War & Peace : Apr 1, 2008
    Bush violated Constitution by misleading US into Iraq War

    George Bush violated the Constitution by going to war under false premises. He and others in his administration did everything they could to ensure that the American people were misled. What are the Democrats going to do now, nothing? For fear of being unpatriotic?

    By the time he leaves office, Bush will have spent more than a trillion dollars on his military adventures. While more than 20 retired American generals have come out strongly opposed to what we're doing in Iraq, our veterans are receiving shameful treatment. In the course of this war, more than 20,000 soldiers have been discharged with so-called "personality disorder," meaning that they're often being denied disability and medical benefits.

    Now, I ask you: Who are the real dysfunctional personalities here? Maybe a president who thinks he's getting messages straight from God? Or a vice president so delusional he believes we can "bunker-bust" Iran's supposed nuclear sites without opening up a whole new front in this madness?

    Click for Jesse Ventura on other issues.   Source: Don`t Start the Revolution, by Jesse Ventura, p.274

    Hillary Clinton on Homeland Security : Mar 25, 2008
    Long-held pro-defense spending stance; not a move to center

    As long as she has been in public life, Clinton has held many positions that are ordinarily associated with Republicans, supporting the death penalty, numerous free-trade agreements, and high defense spending, to name a few. She was also a strong and early supporter of the Iraq war (though she became a critic as the war dragged on). Yet these positions are not only not taken as evidence that she is in fact a centrist, they are used as evidence of insincere political calculation. She has often been characterized as MOVING to the center in preparation for a presidential run, even when her position on the issue in question has remained unchanged.

    For Clinton, long-held positions, like a hawkish approach to military affairs, are taken as evidence of a shift. And the prevailing assumption is that when she breaks with some in her party (or even when she sticks with her party) it is for crass political purposes and not an outgrowth of genuine conviction.

    Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: Free Ride, by David Brock and Paul Waldman, p.134-135

    Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Feb 21, 2008
    Unacceptable to have veterans drive 250 miles to a hospital

    The incredible burden that has been placed on the American people, starting with military families, and the fact that we still are not doing right by our veterans, that we still don’t honor their service, that there are still homeless veterans, that we still don’t screen properly for post-traumatic stress disorder and make sure that they’re getting mental services that they need, that we are still having veterans in south Texas have to drive 250 miles to access a veterans hospital. That’s unacceptable.
    Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2008 Democratic debate at University of Texas in Austin

    Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Feb 2, 2008
    Improve veterans’ mental health treatment & PTSD benefits

    AT A GLANCETHE PROBLEMOBAMA’S PLANOBAMA RECORD
    Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Campaign booklet, “Blueprint for Change”, p. 56-57

    Mike Gravel on Homeland Security : Jan 24, 2008
    Enormous misappropriation of wealth to military programs

    The real money has gone for war preparation and war making. Most Americans today are frustrated and confused. They are told by everyone that they are "the richest people in the world" and "the world's freest nation." Yet, they see poverty in the midst of plenty and continued erosion of their civil liberties. America is no longer #1 in any of the important social and economic indices of the world. In fact, the only areas in which we are #1 are weaponry; consumer spending; government, corporate and private debt; environmental pollution; energy consumption; the incarcerated; and, of course, delusion. With national security as practically the only primary concern of the state since WWII, enormous portions of our wealth and human resources have been misappropriated to military programs, while desperate human needs lie neglected in every corner of our nation. When we assail the military-industrial complex, we assail the idea of a system which values building missiles for overkill more than education.
    Click for Mike Gravel on other issues.   Source: Citizen Power: A Mandate for Change, by Mike Gravel, p. 5-6

    Gloria La Riva on War & Peace : Jan 16, 2008
    Exit Iraq immediately, and pay reparations

    We stand for the immediate removal of all U.S. and foreign forces from Iraq. All U.S. bases and the gigantic U.S. embassy in Baghdad should be shut down immediately. Reparations should be paid to the Iraqi people for the vast destruction inflicted on their land by the launching of an unprovoked war of aggression.
    Click for Gloria La Riva on other issues.   Source: Party campaign website, www.pslweb.org

    Hillary Clinton on Homeland Security : Jan 15, 2008
    Passed legislation to treat veterans’ traumatic brain injury

    We have to do everything necessary to help returning veterans get the health care and the support that they need. This new signature wound called traumatic brain injury is something that I am really upset about, because we’ve only begun to recognize it and diagnose it. I was able to pass legislation to begin to provide the physical and mental evaluations so we could treat this. They’re now getting these exams because we’ve got to track what happens to the veterans and provide the services for them.
    Click for Hillary Clinton on other issues.   Source: 2008 Democratic debate in Las Vegas

    Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Dec 20, 2007
    Congress decides what constitutes torture, not president

    Q: If Congress prohibits a specific interrogation technique, can the president instruct his subordinates to employ that technique despite the statute?

    A: No. The President is not above the law, and not entitled to use techniques that Congress has specifically banned as torture. We must send a message to the world that America is a nation of laws, and a nation that stands against torture. As President I will abide by statutory prohibitions for all US Government personnel and contractors.

    Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Boston Globe questionnaire on Executive Power

    Barack Obama on War & Peace : Sep 26, 2007
    Leave troops for protection of Americans & counterterrorism

    The first thing I will do is initiate a phased redeployment. Military personnel indicate we can get one brigade to two brigades out per month. I would immediately begin that process. We would get combat troops out of Iraq. The only troops that would remain would be those that have to protect US bases and US civilians, as well as to engage in counterterrorism activities in Iraq.
    Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2007 Democratic primary debate at Dartmouth College

    Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Aug 26, 2007
    Support veterans via the Dignity for Wounded Warriors Act

    Following reports of neglect at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Obama introduced the Dignity for Wounded Warriors Act. The bill improves the condition of troop housing, streamlines the process for seeking care, provides greater information to recovering servicemembers, requires the hiring of more caseworkers, and provides more support to family members who care for injured troops:
    Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2008 Presidential campaign website, BarackObama.com “Flyers”

    Joe Biden on Homeland Security : Aug 9, 2007
    Don’t Ask Don’t Tell is antiquated & unworkable

    Q: Would you support a repeal of the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy which would allow gay, lesbian, and bisexual soldiers the right to serve openly in the military?

    A: Sen. Biden supports ending the Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell policy. It is antiquated and unworkable. According to recent polls, 3/4 of veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan said that they had no problem serving with openly gay people. 24 of the nations serving alongside US forces in Iraq permit open service which has had no negative impact on these forces or the morale of our brave soldiers. Finally, the US does not have enough troops to fulfill our current missions--it is ridiculous to turn away brave and patriotic Americans who volunteer to serve solely because of their sexual orientation--especially in light of the Defense Department’s recent decision to extend tours of duty in Iraq. Sen. Biden believes that we should treat everyone serving in the military by the same standards regardless of orientation.

    Click for Joe Biden on other issues.   Source: 2007 HRC/LOGO debate--written questionnaire

    Mike Gravel on Homeland Security : Jun 28, 2007
    Cut Pentagon by more than 15%; we’re squandering money

    KUCINICH [to Gravel]: Spending up to $2 trillion on this war, that is money out of the educational lives of our children. I’m ready to see at least a 15% reduction in that bloated Pentagon budget, stop funding war, start funding education.

    GRAVEL: Dennis, you’re a little too modest on that. I think we can cut a little more than 15%, very much so. You have heard these nostrums before. You’ve heard it 10 years ago, you’ve heard 20 years ago--why doesn’t it change? The Democratic Party hasn’t done appreciably better than the Republican Party in solving these problems. It has to be solved the people, not by your leaders. When he’s talking about the money we’re squandering--21 million Americans could have a four-year college scholarship for the money we’ve squandered in Iraq--7.6 million teachers could have been hired last year if we weren’t squandering this money. Now, how do you think we got into this problem? There is linkage!

    Click for Mike Gravel on other issues.   Source: 2007 Democratic Primary Debate at Howard University

    Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Jun 3, 2007
    Address the deficiencies in the VA system

    We don’t have a full-service VA system, so a lot of troops that have been injured are having to travel elsewhere, and that’s something that we have to address. There are important efficiencies that we can obtain by having a VA hospital system; for example, prescription drugs. But we have to have a VA that serves everybody. In some rural communities that the veterans don’t have access to the services needed, we’ve got to make sure that they do have the option for a private hospital that is close by
    Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2007 Dem. debate at Saint Anselm College

    Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Jun 3, 2007
    The cost of the Iraq war should not shortchange VA benefits

    We tried to tell the Bush administration you need an additional $2 billion to provide services to troops who are coming home. They said no. Everything’s covered. Six months through, they had to come back and say, it turns out we did need it after all. Part of the reason is because they have been trying to keep the costs down of this war and have not fully factored in the sacred obligation that we have to make sure that every single veteran has the services that they need.
    Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2007 Dem. debate at Saint Anselm College

    Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Jun 3, 2007
    Make sure the outpatient facilities work for veterans

    I visited Walter Reed repeatedly. Typically what would happen is we would go to visit troops in the medical facility, and people will acknowledge that the medical facility at Walter Reed does great work. Unfortunately, it turned out that the outpatient facilities were disastrous. That’s why we now have legislation to make sure not only that we’re just painting over some of the mold in there, but also making it easier for families & veterans to negotiate the system once they’re outpatients.
    Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2007 Dem. debate at Saint Anselm College

    Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Mar 27, 2007
    America must practice the patriotism it preaches

    I think it is unconscionable for us to stand by our troops and hoist the flag and suggest how patriotic we are at the same time as the veterans’ budget is being effectively cut.

    I’m going to monitor very closely how we are treating 100,000+ veterans wh are coming home, to make sure the VA has the capacity to provide transition services for veterans who are leaving the service and reentering civilian life--particularly the National Guardsman and Reservists who did not expect to be fighting in Iraq.

    Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: In His Own Words, edited by Lisa Rogak, p.155

    Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Mar 14, 2007
    Comprehensive plan for our veterans healthcare

    Washington says that they support the troops. They give long speeches about valor and sacrifice. But when it comes time to sending our troops into battle with the proper equipment and ensure that veterans have what they need when they get home, they don’t do anything except slap a yellow ribbon on the back of their SUV. That’s how come our men and women have to use scrap metal to protect their Humvees.

    Our veterans end up living among mice and mold. They stare at stacks of paperwork. They thought they left the frontline in Iraq but they came home to a new frontline of red tape and bureaucracy.

    This is unacceptable. When our veterans come home, I don’t want them crawling around a dumpster for a meal or a box for shelter. I don’t want them drowning in whiskey to silence the PTSD. I don’t want that for our veterans. We know they deserve more.

    So let’s make a promise today--and say that, right here and right now, is when we begin to put together a comprehensive plan for our veterans.

    Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: 2007 IAFF Presidential Forum in Washington DC

    Mike Gravel on Homeland Security : Dec 25, 2006
    Raze Guantanamo and Abu Ghraib prisons to the ground

    Click for Mike Gravel on other issues.   Source: 2008 Presidential campaign website, gravel2008.us, “Issues”

    Kirsten Gillibrand on War & Peace : Nov 7, 2006
    Iraq: exit strategy & redeploy troops

    Click for Kirsten Gillibrand on other issues.   Source: 2006 Senate campaign website, gillibrand2006.com, “Issues”

    Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Oct 17, 2006
    Need to be both strong and smart on national defense

    Obama takes an unexceptional position on defense spending, i.e., we need to be strong but we need to be smart about it. However, some papers reported the story as “Obama chides other Democrats on defense.” Of course, it is not true. The rumor got started that way, in the lead of an AP article on Obama’s Sept. 18 speech to Iowa Democrats. Six other articles reporting on the same event failed to mention the mythical attack on other Democrats.
    Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Should Barack Obama be President, by F. Zimmerman, p. 50

    Amy Klobuchar on Homeland Security : Oct 15, 2006
    I supported the Patriot Act

    KENNEDY: Ms. Klobuchar has come out for weakening the Patriot Act that has allowed us to have five years without a terrorist attack on our country. She’s against making sure that we were paying attention when al-Qaeda was talking to somebody in America. And she came out against a bill to make sure that we can get the intelligence we need from those we hold in custody to prevent future attacks.

    KLOBUCHAR: I support winning this war on terror by being smart, I supported the Patriot Act.

    Click for Amy Klobuchar on other issues.   Source: 2006 MN Senate debate, on Meet the Press

    Amy Klobuchar on Homeland Security : Oct 15, 2006
    Patriot Act provides necessary surveillance tools

    KENNEDY: You came out for weakening the Patriot Act. You came out against making sure we were paying attention to what al-Qaeda was saying in this country about plotting future attacks

    KLOBUCHAR: I believe that the people on the front line have to have the tools to wire-tap, they have to have the tools to do the surveillance that we need. I supported the Patriot Act. I did support some of the changes that were later made to the Patriot Act with library books, library records and things like that.

    Click for Amy Klobuchar on other issues.   Source: 2006 MN Senate debate, on Meet the Press

    Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Oct 1, 2006
    Grow size of military to maintain rotation schedules

    Our most complex military challenge will involve putting boots on the ground in the ungoverned or hostile regions where terrorists thrive. That requires a smarter balance between what we spend on fancy hardware and what we spend on our men and women in uniform. That should mean growing the size of our armed forces to maintain reasonable rotation schedules, keeping our troops properly equipped, and training them in the skills they’ll need to succeed in increasingly complex and difficult missions.
    Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: The Audacity of Hope, by Barack Obama, p.307

    Howie Hawkins on Homeland Security : Aug 1, 2006
    Halve defense spending & use funds domestically

    Q: What does Hawkins think of armed forces spending?

    A: Budget on all-Defense related spending is about 8 times more than we spend on education in the US. Halve the Defense spending and use it to build the US domestically.

    Click for Howie Hawkins on other issues.   Source: Email interview on 2006 Senate race with OnTheIssues.org

    John Kasich on Homeland Security : May 10, 2006
    Cheap Hawk: Strong on defense; tight with a dollar

    In the 1980s on the Defense Committee, in addition to the Russians, another enemy was the status quo. I may have been strong on defense, but at the same time I was openly critical of the excess spending in every aspect of the federal budget, which cast m as a kind of cheap hawk and served to essentially alienate me from everyone.

    I was astonished to discover wasteful spending in the Pentagon budget; I was even more astonished that hardly anyone was speaking out against it. The mantra in Washington at that time was to trim the fat from our social welfare and entitlement programs. But to take the welfare out of the Pentagon? Well, to do so as a cheap hawk Republican, who walked the political tightrope of being strong on defense and tight with a dollar. One of my congressional colleagues even called me a traitor to our country, that's how out there my position seemed to be among the hawks in the Republican Party, but my feeling was that we needed to ferret out this waste no matter where we found it.

    Click for John Kasich on other issues.   Source: Stand For Something, by John Kasich, p. 91-92

    Amy Klobuchar on Homeland Security : Jan 18, 2006
    Our troops need the best equipment and intelligence

    I will fight for our government to do all we can to protect our brave men and women who are serving our country abroad. They need the best equipment and intelligence to keep them as safe as possible. And when they return, we must honor their service and bravery by giving them the education and health care benefits they were promised. I am committed to ensuring that our veterans and their families, particularly those who have made the ultimate sacrifice, receive all they deserve.
    Click for Amy Klobuchar on other issues.   Source: 2006 Senate campaign website, www.amyklobuchar.com, “Issues”

    Amy Klobuchar on Homeland Security : Jan 18, 2006
    More screening at ports and nuclear plants

    I will fight to make sure our government is doing the best it can to protect our nation against further terrorist attacks. I believe we need to do more to screen cargo that comes through our ports and to secure our nuclear and chemical plants. Our local communities also need federal support to properly equip and support our first responders?law enforcement officers, firefighters, frontline health care workers and other emergency personnel.
    Click for Amy Klobuchar on other issues.   Source: 2006 Senate campaign website, www.amyklobuchar.com, “Issues”

    Barack Obama on War & Peace : Oct 26, 2004
    Saddam did not own and was not providing WMD to terrorists

    It’s simply not true that Saddam was providing weapons of mass destruction to terrorists. This incursion into Iraq has resulted in a situation in which terrorist recruits are up. It’s been acknowledged, now, by the Pentagon, that the insurgents active in Iraq are far higher. Terrorist attacks worldwide are the highest in 20 years. The notion that somehow we’re less vulnerable in the US as a consequence of spending 200 billion dollars and sacrificing thousands of lives is simply not borne out by the facts
    Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: IL Senate Debate

    Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Jul 12, 2004
    Increase funding to decommission Russian nukes

    More than a decade after the fall of the Berlin Wall, Russia still has more nearly 20,000 nuclear weapons and enough nuclear material to produce 50,000 more. At the current rate of spending, it will take 13 years to secure all the potential bomb material from the old Soviet Republic. We should increase funding to do it in four years. We must also strengthen the existing Non-Proliferation Treaty, and lead in the efforts to prevent countries with the proven capability to build WMDs from doing so.
    Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Press Release, “Renewal of American Leadership ”

    Barack Obama on Homeland Security : Jul 12, 2004
    Balance domestic intelligence reform with civil liberty risk

    [The US should] strengthen and improve intelligence capabilities. We must reform our domestic intelligence capabilities in a manner that balances the risks of impeding on the civil liberties of our citizens and increase international cooperation on all fronts. We should also give the Director of Intelligence the authority he or she needs over budget and personnel to be effective and accountable.
    Click for Barack Obama on other issues.   Source: Press Release, “Renewal of American Leadership ”

    Lincoln Chafee on Homeland Security : Sep 19, 2000
    Supports more spending on Armed Forces personnel

    I’m pleased with the overall direction of President Clinton’s defense budget request. The President has requested $300 billion for the FY 2001 defense budget, a $12 billion increase over current funding. As the first inflation-adjusted defense spending increase in over a decade, it is a wise investment in our national security.

    The funding for Newport, NUWC, Electric Boat, and Raytheon represent an important investment in Rhode Island’s defense industry.

    Click for Lincoln Chafee on other issues.   Source: Press Release, “investment in our national security”, Feb. 7

    Donald Trump on Homeland Security : Jul 2, 2000
    3% of GNP for military is too low

    To tell the enemy we’re not going to invade defies common sense. That lack of confidence may reflect another troubling reality: our diminished military forces. To wage our aerial assault on Yugoslavia we had to call upon US forces from all points of the globe. Why? Because we’re spread too thin. The US last year spent 3% of gross domestic product maintaining our military forces. Compare that with past figures: Defense spending in the last year of the Carter administration came to 4.9% of GDP. During the Reagan buildup it was 6.5%. We are still living off the Reagan military buildup of nearly 20 years ago. The question is: What will we live off ten or fifteen years from now if we do not invest again?

    You can’t pursue forward military and foreign-policy objectives on a backward military budget. I’m not advocating that America go forth and police the world. I’m just saying that if we’re going to use our military power abroad, we had better make sure that power is ready to be used.

    Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: The America We Deserve, by Donald Trump, p.149

    Lincoln Chafee on Homeland Security : Jan 1, 2000
    Decrease funding for missile defense

    Click for Lincoln Chafee on other issues.   Source: 2000 National Political Awareness Test

    Jesse Ventura on War & Peace : Jan 1, 1999
    We need Saddam as the bad guy in oil disputes

    I can tell you the reason why we keep getting into scuffles with Saddam Hussein: We need him. The fact that we’ve kept him in power and haven’t taken him out is intentional. We need a bad guy there. We need a reason to keep our military personnel on the pulse of the world’s oil reserves. We put him in there--do you think we couldn’t have taken him down by now if we had wanted to? And he knows it. That’s why he misbehaves!
    Click for Jesse Ventura on other issues.   Source: Ain’t Got Time To Bleed, p. 35

    Donald Trump on Homeland Security : Oct 27, 1997
    1994 Veteran's parade: Such high-quality people led military

    [After a poorly-attended Veteran's Day parade], a group of veterans wanted to do it differently the following year. Those veterans asked me to lead it as Grand Marshal--essentially they wanted my stamp of approval. They needed dollars. They knew I could raise lots of money and get additional donors. They also knew I would attract a lot of press.

    I agreed. I thought it would be fun, and I knew it was important. Mayor Giuliani was pledging the support of the city. I put up money; others matched it. I always knew there was a military out there, but I had no idea such high quality people led it. This is something I got to know, and know very well, over the next few months.

    Click for Donald Trump on other issues.   Source: The Art of the Comeback, by Donald Trump, p.168-72

    • Additional quotations related to Armed Forces Personnel issues can be found under Homeland Security.
    • Click here for definitions & background information on Homeland Security.
    Candidates on Homeland Security:
     Related issues:
    Afghanistan
    Benghazi
    Gays in Military
    Guantanamo
    Iranian Nukes
    Iraq
    Israel & Palestine
    Nuclear Energy & Weapons
    SDI Missile Defense
    Terrorism
    Veterans
    War on Terror
    WMD

    2020 Presidential primary contenders:
    Sen.Michael Bennet (D-CO)
    V.P.Joe Biden (D-DE)
    Mayor Mike Bloomberg (I-NYC)
    Gov.Steve Bullock (D-MT)
    Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D-IN)
    Sen.Cory Booker (D-NJ)
    Secy.Julian Castro (D-TX)
    Mayor Bill de Blasio (D-NYC)
    Rep.John Delaney (D-MD)
    Rep.Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI)
    Sen.Kamala Harris (D-CA)
    Sen.Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)
    Gov.Deval Patrick (D-MA)
    Sen.Bernie Sanders (I-VT)
    Adm.Joe Sestak (D-PA)
    CEO Tom Steyer (D-CA)
    Sen.Elizabeth Warren (D-MA)
    Marianne Williamson (D-CA)
    CEO Andrew Yang (D-NY)


    2020 GOP and Independent Candidates:
    Rep.Justin Amash (I-MI)
    CEO Don Blankenship (C-WV)
    Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
    Howie Hawkins (G-NY)
    V.P.Mike Pence (R-IN)
    Gov.Mark Sanford (R-SC)
    Pres.Donald Trump (R-NY)
    V.C.Arvin Vohra (L-MD)
    Rep.Joe Walsh (R-IL)
    Gov.Bill Weld (R-MA&L-NY)

    2020 Withdrawn Candidates:
    State Rep.Stacey Abrams (D-GA)
    Sen.Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY)
    Sen.Mike Gravel (D-AK)
    Gov.John Hickenlooper (D-CO)
    Gov.Larry Hogan (R-MD)
    Gov.Jay Inslee (D-WA)
    Gov.John Kasich (R-OH)
    Mayor Wayne Messam (D-FL)
    Rep.Seth Moulton (D-MA)
    Rep.Beto O`Rourke (D-TX)
    Rep.Tim Ryan (D-CA)
    CEO Howard Schultz (I-WA)
    Rep.Eric Swalwell (D-CA)
    2016 Presidential contenders:
    Pres.Donald Trump (R-NY)
    V.P.Mike Pence (R-IN)
    Secy.Hillary Clinton (D-NY)
    Sen.Tim Kaine (D-VA,VP)
    Gov.Gary Johnson (L-NM)
    Dr.Jill Stein (G-MA)
    Ajamu Baraka (G-VP)
    Evan McMullin (I-UT)
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    Page last updated: Oct 08, 2020