Donald Trump on Jobs

2016 Republican nominee for President; 2000 Reform Primary Challenger for President


How do people make it on $7.25? Raise state minimum wage

Donald Trump said in television interviews that he would like an increase in the minimum wage and that it is best that such a change happen at the state level.

In the past, Trump has opposed upping the minimum wage. But in recent days, he has increasingly warmed to the idea. "I have seen what's going on, and I don't know how people make it on $7.25," said Trump, referencing the federal minimum hourly wage. "With that being said, I would like to see an increase of some magnitude, but I'd rather leave it to the states. Let the states decide."

Speaking at a second interview, the business mogul said, "I haven't decided in terms of numbers, but I think people have to get more." He acknowledged that he was putting forth a position at odds with his previous stance. "Sure, it's a change. I'm allowed to change. You need flexibility," he said.

Source: Washington Post, "Minimum-wage hike," by Sean Sullivan , May 8, 2016

I'm the only one on this stage who's hired people

RUBIO: Donald, you've hired a significant number of people from other countries to take jobs that Americans could have filled. You have brought over a thousand people from all over the world to fill maid jobs.

TRUMP: As far as the people I've hired in Florida during the prime season, you could not get help. People didn't want to have part-time jobs. There were part-time jobs, very seasonal, 90-day jobs, 120-day jobs. I'm the only one on the stage that's hired people. You haven't hired anybody.

Source: 2016 CNN-Telemundo Republican debate on eve of Texas primary , Feb 25, 2016

Bring jobs back from China, Mexico, Japan, and Vietnam

I'm going to bring jobs back from China, Mexico Japan, Vietnam. They are taking our jobs. They are taking our wealth. We have $2.5 trillion offshore. We're going to bring that money back. You take a look at what happened just this week, China bought the Chicago Stock Exchange. Nabisco and Ford, they're all moving out. We have an economy that last quarter didn't grow. We have to make our economy grow again.
Source: 2016 CBS Republican primary debate in South Carolina , Feb 13, 2016

Don't raise minimum wage; it makes us non-competitive

Q: Picketers have gathered demanding an immediate hike in the minimum wage to $15 an hour. Are you sympathetic to the protesters?

DONALD TRUMP: I can't be. We are a country that is being beaten on every front economically & militarily. There is nothing that we do now to win. We don't win anymore. [If our] wages are too high, we're not going to be able to compete against the world. I hate to say it, but we have to leave it the way it is. People have to work really hard and have to get into that upper stratum. But we can not do this if we are going to compete with the rest of the world. We just can't do it.

Q: So do not raise the minimum wage?

TRUMP: I would not do it.

CARSON: Every time we raise the minimum wage, the number of jobless people increases.

MARCO RUBIO: If I thought that raising the minimum wage was the best way to help people increase their pay, I would be all for it, but it isn't. If you raise the minimum wage, you're going to make people more expensive than a machine.

Source: Fox Business/WSJ First Tier debate , Nov 10, 2015

I have relevant experience by creating jobs and assets

I've created tens of thousands of jobs and a great company. It's a company I'm very proud of. Some of the most iconic assets anywhere in the world. I don't have to give you a website because I'm self-funding my campaign. I'm putting up my own money. I want to make our country greater than it's ever been. I think we have that potential. We cannot lose this election.
Source: Fox Business/WSJ Second Tier debate , Nov 10, 2015

Teachers unions are obstacles to improving schools

In our educational system, one huge obstacle is the strength of the teacher unions. Teacher unions don't want school choice because it means a potential reduction in union-protected jobs. Thanks to strong contracts negotiated by the New York City teacher union, it's become almost impossible to discipline a teacher, much less actually fire one.

When there is a legitimate complaint against a teacher in the New York system, rather than having a quick hearing to determine the validity of the complaint, teachers are assigned to an area known as "the rubber room" while they wait for their hearing.

And they wait. They sit in empty classrooms or converted closets and do nothing--but still get paid their whole salary. Some teachers spend several years waiting. No wonder they call it the rubber room--the whole concept is insane.

Source: Crippled America, by Donald Trump, p. 55 , Nov 3, 2015

Rebuilding America will create 13 million jobs

What are our priorities? Before we build bridges to Mars, let's make sure the bridges over the Mississippi River aren't going to fall down.

A few years ago, Moody's, the financial investment agency, calculated that every $1 of federal money invested in improving the infrastructure for highways and public schools would guarantee $1.44 back to the economy. Infrastructure investments have one of the strongest direct economic impacts.

You know why that is? Jobs. These projects put people to work--not just the people doing the work, but also the manufacturers, the suppliers, the designers, and yes, even the lawyers. The Senate Budget Committee estimates that rebuilding America will create 13 million jobs. Our economy needs more available jobs.

If we do what we have to do correctly, we can create the biggest economic boom in this country since the New Deal when our vast infrastructure was first put into place. It's a no-brainer. It's so obvious that even the Democrats can figure it out.

Source: Crippled America, by Donald Trump, p124-5 , Nov 3, 2015

FactCheck: Yes, Trump wanted a casino, and Jeb opposed it

Jeb Bush asked about Trump's statement that politicians could be bought: "The one guy that had some special interests that I know of that tried to get me to change my views on something--that gave me money--was Donald Trump," Bush said. "He wanted casino gambling in Florida."

That's when Trump cut him off--and failed to tell the truth. "I didn't," Trump said. But for more than 21 years, Trump did. He and his company have repeatedly been on record trying to get casino deals in one form or another in Florida.

Trump didn't just stop with his one false denial. He doubled down. Immediately after Trump said "I didn't" want casinos in Florida, Bush corrected him: "Yes you did. You wanted it and you didn't get it because I was opposed."

Trump, cutting him off: "[If I'd wanted it], I promise I would have gotten it."

Wrong again. As early as 1994, just before Florida voters rejected expanded gambling, Trump told The Miami Herald: "I'm going to be the first one to open up if Floridians vote for them."

Source: Politico FactCheck on 2015 Republican two-tier CNN debate , Sep 17, 2015

2013: Failed to persuade Florida legislators on large casino

[Did Trump try unsuccessfully to get casinos into Florida while Jeb Bush was governor? Yes.] From hiring lobbyists to taking a former business partner to court, Trump's interest in getting a piece of Florida's gaming industry has been documented in news articles from Tallahassee to Miami. Trump's involvement in expanding Florida gaming--an effort that regularly fails in the state Capitol due to the influence of conservative lawmakers--is well-known among state capital reporters, politicians and lobbyists alike.

As early as 1994, Trump [said he would open a casino if voters approved it]. A decade later, Florida approved casinos. Today, Florida has 15 of them. None are owned by Trump. But he tried after he bought the Doral Golf Resort & Spa near Miami and joined the failed fight to have lawmakers approve new, large "destination-resort" casinos. "If Miami doesn't do casinos, that would be a terrible mistake," Trump told The Miami Herald in 2013. But Trump didn't get what he wanted.

Source: Politico FactCheck on 2015 Republican two-tier CNN debate , Sep 17, 2015

Don't raise minimum wage, but create more opportunities

Q: What is a fair living wage?

TRUMP: I want to keep the minimum wage pretty much where it is right now. Because of the fact that we have a country that is now competing more than ever before because of airplanes, and transportation, and the internet. If we raise it we're not going to be able to compete with the rest of the world. What I do want to do is bring in jobs so much so that people don't have to live on minimum wage. But we are going to have to compete with the rest of the world.

Source: Meet the Press 2015 interviews of 2016 presidential hopefuls , Aug 16, 2015

Take jobs back from foreign countries to lower unemployment

My policy is going to be something that's going to set the country back right. I mean, one of the big things is we have to take back jobs from China.

We have to take back jobs from Japan, and Vietnam, and Mexico, and virtually everybody that's taking our jobs and ruining our manufacturing base. And we have to put people to work. Because the real unemployment number is probably 21%. People give up looking for jobs. And they no longer become a statistic. And it's very unfair. So we have to put our country back to work. We have to get great jobs for people and good paying jobs for people. And we're going to be just fine.

Source: Meet the Press 2015 interviews of 2016 presidential hopefuls , Aug 2, 2015

Real unemployment rate is 20%; don't believe 5.6%

Last quarter, it was just announced our gross domestic product--a sign of strength, right? But not for us. It was below zero. Whoever heard of this? It's never below zero.

Our labor participation rate was the worst since 1978. But think of it, GDP below zero, horrible labor participation rate. Our real unemployment is anywhere from 18% to 20%. Don't believe the 5.6%. The real number is anywhere from 18% to maybe even 21%, and nobody talks about it, because it's a statistic that's full of nonsense.

Source: 2015 announcement speeches of 2016 presidential hopefuls , Jun 16, 2015

Raising business tax causes businesses to move jobs overseas

People are smart. They know you can't be "for" jobs but against those who create them. It doesn't work. All raising taxes on businesses does is force business owners to lay off employees they can no longer afford. It also drives up prices, encourages businessmen and women to move their businesses (and their jobs) to other countries that have far lower tax rates and regulatory costs, and sends people scrambling for tax shelters. Obama appears surprisingly clueless about how easy it is now for anyone to outsource jobs to foreign workers with just the click of a mouse. On our broadband, high-speed Internet world, the old brick-and-mortar barriers of business have vanished. That me
Source: Time to Get Tough, by Donald Trump, p. 54 , Dec 5, 2011

Unions fight for pay; managers fight for less; consumers win

It’s probably more refreshing to deal with the Teamsters than the AFT or NEA. At least the leaders of the Teamsters don’t blow smoke. The construction unions I deal with want more in the pay envelope for their rank and file. That’s what they tell you every time you sit down at the table. You can respect that-even as you push back to cut the best deal from your perspective. That’s the American way.

What we all want is monopoly-dominance in our chosen line of work that allows us to call the tune. No one really wants to compete-they have to in order to survive. Everyone pursues monopoly, the system prevents it, and the results is the world’s most competition-intensive economy. Who wins? Consumers do. They get more choice and more quality at lower cost.

Source: The America We Deserve, by Donald Trump, p. 78-79 , Jul 2, 2000

Foreign companies are taking jobs from US

Trump said he wasn’t surprised by the violence this week at the World Trade Organization meeting in Seattle. Protesters there accused the global organization of considering only the needs of giant multinational corporations at the expense of protecting the environment and worker rights. “I’m not so sure that anybody can dispute what’s happening in Seattle,” Trump said. “Jobs are going left and right. Foreign companies are ripping off the United States like never before.”
Source: Pat Eaton-Robb, Associated Press , Dec 2, 1999

Other candidates on Jobs: Donald Trump on other issues:
Former Presidents/Veeps:
George W. Bush (R,2001-2009)
V.P.Dick Cheney
Bill Clinton (D,1993-2001)
V.P.Al Gore
George Bush Sr. (R,1989-1993)
Ronald Reagan (R,1981-1989)
Jimmy Carter (D,1977-1981)
Gerald Ford (R,1974-1977)
Richard Nixon (R,1969-1974)
Lyndon Johnson (D,1963-1969)
John F. Kennedy (D,1961-1963)
Dwight Eisenhower (R,1953-1961)
Harry_S_TrumanHarry S Truman(D,1945-1953)

Religious Leaders:
New Testament
Old Testament
Pope Francis

Political Thinkers:
Noam Chomsky
Milton Friedman
Arianna Huffington
Rush Limbaugh
Tea Party
Ayn Rand
Secy.Robert Reich
Joe Scarborough
Gov.Jesse Ventura
Civil Rights
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Page last updated: Sep 15, 2016