State of Ohio Archives: on Principles & Values


Mike DeWine: Protests against me protected by First Amendment

The only thing that I've asked our protests to do is to observe social distancing. We're all big believers in the First Amendment. They were protesting against me yesterday, and that's just fine. They have every right to do that.
Source: Meet the Press 2020 interview on 2022 Ohio Governor race Apr 19, 2020

Jay Inslee: We need to make decisions based on science and reality

We need to make decisions based on science and reality. And there are some hard realities we have to understand. And that is, unless we continue a very vigorous social distancing program in my state, this is going to continue to spread like wildfire to every single corner of my state. That is an inevitable scientific fact. And we have only one weapon to prevent that. And that is to continue our social distancing.
Source: CNN 2020 "State of the Union": 2022 Ohio Gubernatorial race Mar 29, 2020

Mike Gibbons: Keep God in the public sphere

Q: Do you support or oppose the statement, "Keep God in the public sphere"?

A: Strongly support

Source: OnTheIssues interview of 2018 Ohio Senate candidate Apr 24, 2018

John Kasich: Respect for secular humanists

The humanists in our country are the ones who have charted a course based on reason--human reason. And they wake up every day with a goal. Their goal is to improve the world. Their goal is to make the world a better place. But these secular humanists follow that code, and they do great. And many of my friends are secular humanists, and I respect them for it. But as for me, and maybe for some of us, we need to go deeper. We need to have a more permanent compass.
Source: 2018 Ohio State of the State address Mar 7, 2018

Connie Pillich: Announced candidacy on route of Cincinnati Women's March

Connie announced her campaign for Governor along the same route she joined with thousands of women on January 21, 2017 as part of the Cincinnati Women's March. Inspired by the energy of that day and determined to not let it fade away, Connie is dedicated to helping Democrats reclaim our status as patriots because she knows we cannot be afraid to stand up for our values.

As Governor, Connie will take the lessons she learned as a Captain in the U.S. Air Force to provide the progressive and unflinching leadership Ohioans need to improve our schools, rebuild our infrastructure, and bring back the industry and jobs that can support a family.

The youngest of five, Connie grew up in a working-class neighborhood in the shadow of a steel mill, which closed. Connie put herself through college with an ROTC scholarship, student loans, and part-time work.

Source: 2018 Ohio gubernatorial campaign website ConniePillich.com May 2, 2017

Mary Taylor: Served as Director of Insurance, while Lt. Governor

Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor stepped down as director of the Ohio Department of Insurance today as she seeks the Republican nomination for governor. Taylor, who remains lieutenant governor, faces a potential 2018 primary. Taylor's resignation permits her to now accept campaign contributions from insurance-industry sources and employees.

She took a big pay cut upon resigning. As a cabinet director, Taylor earned $150,405 a year rather than the lieutenant governor's salary of $78,021.

Gov. Kasich, who will be forced from office by term limits in January 2019, has said he supports his No. 2 amid the field of gubernatorial candidates. "I am grateful for her work and will continue to rely on her advice and counsel as lieutenant governor," Kasich said in a statement.

Source: The Columbus Dispatch on 2018 Ohio gubernatorial race Mar 31, 2017

Jim Renacci: OhioFirst: the day of the career politicians needs to change

Positioning himself as businessman who operates outside politics as usual, U.S. Rep. Jim Renacci announced that he is running for governor in 2018 and he unveiled his campaign slogan: OhioFirst.

Renacci, who strongly backed Republican Donald Trump for president last year, is serving his fourth term in Congress. Before entering politics, though, he owned nursing homes and other business ventures over three decades. "I was a business guy for 30 years, someone who created jobs and employed people. I want to use that background and experience. I do believe Donald Trump said the same thing. I supported Donald Trump because I believe the day of the career politicians, especially in D.C. but also here in Ohio, needs to change," Renacci said.

Source: Dayton Daily News on 2018 Ohio gubernatorial race Feb 4, 2017

Warren Davidson: Political left has maintained a progressive attack on faith

Q: Briefly describe your spiritual beliefs and values.

Davidson: I committed to following Christ to the best of my ability at 3:34 am on 19 August 1987. To succinctly describe my doctrine, Ephesians 2:1-10. How do I translate that into my values? I strive to live a fully integrated life. My first ministry focus is my family. Before the fall, God gave Adam work to do. I strive to honor God in my work, in how I treat others, in shaping our cultures, and in being excellent at the work itself. I sometimes fail, but I always strive. I grow with others via regular church and small groups. In public policy, the political left has maintained a progressive attack on faith that is well contrasted by the differences between the persuasive language of Uncle Tom's Cabin and the debates of today. We need leaders who can protect religious liberty for all by ensuring that government is limited to its Constitutionally enumerated powers.

Source: 2016 AFA Action iVoterGuide on Ohio House race Nov 8, 2016

Sherrod Brown: AdWatch: nepotistic hiring practices at the state treasury

Sherrod Brown is taking on his Republican opponent's hiring practices at the state treasury in his first TV ad of the campaign. The 30-second spot, called "How to Succeed," began airing Thursday on TV and cable stations statewide. It criticizes Ohio Treasurer Josh Mandel for paying state salaries of between $90,000 and $150,000 to a former campaign manager, a college friend and a political aide. It notes the 26-year-old aide was made state director of debt management despite lacking finance experience.

Mandel's campaign says Brown went negative to distract from his record. Brown's campaign says outside groups have already spent $5 million on Mandel's behalf attacking Brown, who is a former state secretary and congressman.

Source: Dayton Daily News' 2012 Ohio Senate ad review Apr 27, 2012

Josh Mandel: OpEd: Missed 14 monthly meetings as Ohio Treasurer

Republican Josh Mandel has launched his first TV ad in his quest to unseat Democratic U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown. The 30-second spot doesn't mention that Mandel is Ohio's state treasurer. He's been criticized for neglecting that job to launch his Senate bid and raise money across the country. Mandel missed 14 monthly meetings of a powerful deposit board he chairs, and took a weekday fundraising trip to the Bahamas. A message was left with Mandel's campaign spokesman seeking confirmation.
Source: Coshocton Tribune's 2012 Ohio Senate ad review Apr 19, 2012

John Kasich: Kasich rhymes with Basic

John Kasich (rhymes with Basic) is proud to call Ohio his home, and he is optimistic about our future. He understands that our great state is hurting, and believes we can do better.

The son of a mailman, John grew up in a blue collar neighborhood in McKee's Rocks, Pennsylvania, just outside of Pittsburgh. Like many Americans his values were shaped by a childhood rooted in faith, family, community and common sense.

Source: 2010 House campaign website, kasichforohio.com, "Biography" Nov 2, 2010

John Kasich: Host of weekly news show, "Heartland with John Kasich"

His leadership in Washington and his ability to communicate powerfully and effectively have given John a broad platform to shape public opinion as a commentator, appearing on virtually every major network and cable news show. He has also hosted a national weekly news show called "Heartland with John Kasich," which allowed him to provide a uniquely Midwestern perspective to news from around the nation and world.
Source: 2010 House campaign website, kasichforohio.com, "Biography" Nov 2, 2010

Jon Husted: Public prayer in Legislature is free speech

As Speaker of the House, Jon Husted fought to preserve opening prayer before House session. Husted protected guest pastor prayer, and in a memo to the House Clerk stated that as "the leader of this esteemed chamber, I will not allow our prayers to be censored."

After questions about the policy arose, Husted stood strong on the principles of free speech and religious tolerance by protecting the important tradition of reflection and guidance through prayer.

Source: Ohio Secretary State campaign website HustedForOhio.com Nov 1, 2010

Lee Fisher: I'm just as angry at Washington insiders as you are

Portman & Fisher tangled over jobs, gays in the military, tax cuts and who deserves the blame for Ohio's sluggish economy. They each pointed fingers at one another.

Portman said, "One thing we need to do is to not promote policies in Washington that he's promoting that makes it harder to get ahead in Ohio."

"In this election, you have a very, very clear choice," Fisher told debate viewers. "You can choose someone who has been on the ground in every corner of this state working to save jobs in the middle of this national recession and is just as angry as you are at the Washington insiders who caused this recession. Or you can choose my opponent, Congressman Portman, who the Washington Post calls Mr. Washington."

Portman said, "If you like the way things are going, think we're headed in the right direction, you should probably support my opponent. If you're ready for a change, if you believe there's a better way, I hope you'll join our cause."

Source: Dayton Daily News coverage of 2010 Ohio Senate debate Oct 13, 2010

Rob Portman: If you like the way things are going, support my opponent

Portman & Fisher tangled over jobs, gays in the military, tax cuts and who deserves the blame for Ohio's sluggish economy. They each pointed fingers at one another.

Portman said, "One thing we need to do is to not promote policies in Washington that he's promoting that makes it harder to get ahead in Ohio."

"In this election, you have a very, very clear choice," Fisher told debate viewers. "You can choose someone who has been on the ground in every corner of this state working to save jobs in the middle of this national recession and is just as angry as you are at the Washington insiders who caused this recession. Or you can choose my opponent, Congressman Portman, who the Washington Post calls Mr. Washington."

Portman said, "If you like the way things are going, think we're headed in the right direction, you should probably support my opponent. If you're ready for a change, if you believe there's a better way, I hope you'll join our cause."

Source: Dayton Daily News coverage of 2010 Ohio Senate debate Oct 13, 2010

Lee Fisher: Ohio voters are mad as hell over Republican policies

Fisher opened his remarks declaring that Ohio voters are "mad as hell" over Republican tax, trade, and job policies.

Portman, a top adviser to President George W. Bush, stuck to his main campaign theme: Fisher and the Democrats are to blame for Ohio's nearly 400,000 job losses.

Both candidates argued that other was of more of a career politician and insider, which injected energy into the debate. Fisher referred to Portman--a former corporate lawyer--as a lobbyist, Mr. Washington, a rubber stamp and the chief architect of Bush policies.

Asked by a debate panelist to reconcile such claims with his own long career as a political insider, Fisher said, "The bottom line is not so much whether you serve, it's who you serve. I think he's serving the lobbyists and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the insurance industry and Wall Street," Fisher said.

Source: Cleveland Plain-Dealer coverage of 2010 Ohio Senate debate Oct 8, 2010

Rob Portman: A top adviser to President George W. Bush

Fisher opened his remarks declaring that Ohio voters are "mad as hell" over Republican tax, trade, and job policies.

Portman, a top adviser to President George W. Bush, stuck to his main campaign theme: Fisher and the Democrats are to blame for Ohio's nearly 400,000 job losses.

Both candidates argued that other was of more of a career politician and insider, which injected energy into the debate. Fisher referred to Portman--a former corporate lawyer--as a lobbyist, Mr. Washington, a rubber stamp and the chief architect of Bush policies.

Asked by a debate panelist to reconcile such claims with his own long career as a political insider, Fisher said, "The bottom line is not so much whether you serve, it's who you serve. I think he's serving the lobbyists and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the insurance industry and Wall Street," Fisher said.

Source: Cleveland Plain-Dealer coverage of 2010 Ohio Senate debate Oct 8, 2010

Mike DeWine: Worked in a bi-partisan manner to get things done

For 12 years in the Senate, Iíve gotten things done. And the way Iíve gotten things done is by working with Democrats and Republicans. I worked with Rockefeller, for example, on highway safety issues, on steel, and on other issues as well-adoption, foster care. I worked with Dodd to get better medicines for kids, on the fire act to get money, $100 million, directly back in Ohio. I worked with Levin in regard to the Great Lakes. I have a long record of working with Democrats and Republicans alike.
Source: 2006 Ohio Senate Debate on NBC Meet the Press Oct 1, 2006

Mike DeWine: Brown does not represent the mainstream of Ohio

The difference between me and Brown is, if you look at his record, he has a very slim record in the House of getting anything done. He has been described as a partisan in the Cleveland Plain Dealer. He has been described as someone who is on the fringe by the National Journal. Heís on the fringe of his own party. Many times his votes have been in the minority even of his own party. He is to the left of his own party and not in the mainstream of Ohio
Source: 2006 Ohio Senate Debate on NBC Meet the Press Oct 1, 2006

Sherrod Brown: Endorsed by conservative group that cares about tax fairness

The Certified Public Accountants of Ohio, a, a Republican-leaning conservative business group that cares about economic development, that cares about tax cuts for the middle class, that cares about fairness, and is a conservative Republican-leaning group, as I said, has endorsed me. Iím the only Democrat challenger in the country that was endorsed by them. I can make a long list of bipartisan issues I worked on. My ultimate allegiance is to the middle class and working to help Ohioans.
Source: 2006 Ohio Senate Debate on NBC Meet the Press Oct 1, 2006

Paul Hackett: Ohio Democrats need an 88-county strategy to win elections

The selection of a new Ohio Democratic Party Chair should not be taken lightly. I hope that the Ohio Democratic Party will give the men and women who make up our party the opportunity to be involved in the process. Regional meetings may just be the forum we need to make that possible.

All over this state I meet people who feel forgotten by their party. that the red pigment their town or county represents on a map serves as a stop sign to their party when resources are being handed out. If we fail to compete in every region of this state, we will continue to fail in election after election. This party needs an eighty-eight county strategy for growing our party and building a farm team of candidates. If we ever want to win an election, we must compete in every county, city, town and precinct.

Source: Press release, ďOhio Democratic PartyĒ Nov 8, 2005

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2020 Presidential contenders on Principles & Values:
  Democrats running for President:
Sen.Michael Bennet (D-CO)
V.P.Joe Biden (D-DE)
Mayor Mike Bloomberg (I-NYC)
Gov.Steve Bullock (D-MT)
Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D-IN)
Sen.Cory Booker (D-NJ)
Secy.Julian Castro (D-TX)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Rep.John Delaney (D-MD)
Rep.Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI)
Sen.Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)
Gov.Deval Patrick (D-MA)
Sen.Bernie Sanders (I-VT)
CEO Tom Steyer (D-CA)
Sen.Elizabeth Warren (D-MA)
Marianne Williamson (D-CA)
CEO Andrew Yang (D-NY)

2020 Third Party Candidates:
Rep.Justin Amash (L-MI)
CEO Don Blankenship (C-WV)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Howie Hawkins (G-NY)
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Howard Schultz(I-WA)
Gov.Jesse Ventura (I-MN)
Republicans running for President:
Sen.Ted Cruz(R-TX)
Gov.Larry Hogan (R-MD)
Gov.John Kasich(R-OH)
V.P.Mike Pence(R-IN)
Gov.Mark Sanford (R-SC)
Pres.Donald Trump(R-NY)
Rep.Joe Walsh (R-IL)
Gov.Bill Weld(R-MA & L-NY)

2020 Withdrawn Democratic Candidates:
Sen.Stacey Abrams (D-GA)
Mayor Bill de Blasio (D-NYC)
Sen.Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY)
Sen.Mike Gravel (D-AK)
Sen.Kamala Harris (D-CA)
Gov.John Hickenlooper (D-CO)
Gov.Jay Inslee (D-WA)
Mayor Wayne Messam (D-FL)
Rep.Seth Moulton (D-MA)
Rep.Beto O`Rourke (D-TX)
Rep.Tim Ryan (D-CA)
Adm.Joe Sestak (D-PA)
Rep.Eric Swalwell (D-CA)
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