OnTheIssuesLogo

Ed Case on Tax Reform

Former Democratic Representative (HI-2, until 2007)

 


Bush tax cuts unaffordable; targeted middle-class cuts ok

Q: Do you favor making the tax cuts permanent?

A: I voted against that initiative. It was unaffordable, especially as we had already intervened in Iraq, and one could see that was going to be far more expensive than anybody projected. I had voted against some tax cut extensions, especially those for the very upper income families, because I donít think itís fair, or necessary. But I have voted for some extensions that I think have very targeted purposes and are targeted for the middle class.

Source: 2006 HI Senate Debate on PBS Hawaii , Aug 31, 2006

Voted NO on retaining reduced taxes on capital gains & dividends.

Vote to reduce federal spending by $56.1 billion over five years by retaining a reduced tax rate on capital gains and dividends, as well as.
Reference: Tax Relief Extension Reconciliation Act; Bill HR 4297 ; vote number 2005-621 on Dec 8, 2005

Voted YES on providing tax relief and simplification.

Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004
Reference: Bill sponsored by Bill Rep Thomas [R, CA-22]; Bill H.R.1308 ; vote number 2004-472 on Sep 23, 2004

Voted NO on making permanent an increase in the child tax credit.

Vote to pass a bill that would permanently extend the $1,000 per child tax credit that is scheduled to revert to $700 per child in 2005. It would raise the amount of income a taxpayer may earn before the credit begins to phase out from $75,000 to $125,000 for single individuals and from $110,000 to $250,000 for married couples. It also would permit military personnel to include combat pay in their gross earnings in order to calculate eligibility for the child tax credit.
Reference: Child Credit Preservation and Expansion Act; Bill HR 4359 ; vote number 2004-209 on May 20, 2004

Voted YES on permanently eliminating the marriage penalty.

Vote to pass a bill that would permanently extend tax provisions eliminating the so-called marriage penalty. The bill would make the standard deduction for married couples double that of single taxpayers. It would also increase the upper limit of the 15 percent tax bracket for married couples to twice that of singles. It also would make permanent higher income limits for married couples eligible to receive the refundable earned-income tax credit.
Reference: Marriage Penalty Relief; Bill HR 4181 ; vote number 2004-138 on Apr 28, 2004

Rated 29% by NTU, indicating a "Big Spender" on tax votes.

Case scores 29% by NTU on tax-lowering policies

Every year National Taxpayers Union (NTU) rates U.S. Representatives and Senators on their actual votesóevery vote that significantly affects taxes, spending, debt, and regulatory burdens on consumers and taxpayers. NTU assigned weights to the votes, reflecting the importance of each voteís effect. NTU has no partisan axe to grind. All Members of Congress are treated the same regardless of political affiliation. Our only constituency is the overburdened American taxpayer. Grades are given impartially, based on the Taxpayer Score. The Taxpayer Score measures the strength of support for reducing spending and regulation and opposing higher taxes. In general, a higher score is better because it means a Member of Congress voted to lessen or limit the burden on taxpayers. The Taxpayer Score can range between zero and 100. We do not expect anyone to score a 100, nor has any legislator ever scored a perfect 100 in the multi-year history of the comprehensive NTU scoring system. A high score does not mean that the Member of Congress was opposed to all spending or all programs. High-scoring Members have indicated that they would vote for many programs if the amount of spending were lower. A Member who wants to increase spending on some programs can achieve a high score if he or she votes for offsetting cuts in other programs. A zero score would indicate that the Member of Congress approved every spending proposal and opposed every pro-taxpayer reform.

Source: NTU website 03n-NTU on Dec 31, 2003

2016-17 Governor, House and Senate candidates on Tax Reform: Ed Case on other issues:
HI Gubernatorial:
Bob McDermott
Colleen Hanabusa
David Ige
Duke Aiona
John Carroll
Neil Abercrombie
HI Senatorial:
Brian Schatz
Cam Cavasso
Colleen Hanabusa
Eddie Pirkowski
John Carroll
Linda Lingle
Mazie Hirono

Special elections in 2017-18:
AZ-8:Franks(R, resigned in sex scandal)
AZ-8:Lesko(R, elected April 24, 2018)
CA-34:Becerra(D; appointed CA Atty General)
CA-34:Gomez(D; elected June 6, 2017)
CA-34:Ahn(D; lost primary)
GA-6:Price(R; appointed HHS Secretary)
GA-6:Handel(R; elected June 20)
GA-6:Ossoff(D; lost election June 20, 2017)
KS-4:Pompeo(R; appointed CIA Director)
KS-4:Estes(R; elected April 11)
MT-0:Zinke(R; appointed DOI Secretary)
MT-0:Gianforte(R; elected May 25)
OH-12:Tiberi(R, resigned to become a lobbyist)
OH-12:Balderson(R, elected Aug. 24, 2018)
PA-18:Murphy(R, resigned in sex scandal)
PA-18:Lamb(D; elected April 2018)
SC-5:Mulvaney(R; appointed OMB Director)
SC-5:Norman(R; elected June 20)
TX-27:Farenthold(R, resigned in sex scandal)
TX-27:Cloud(R, elected June 30, 2018)
UT-3:Chaffetz(R, resigned for unexplained reasons)
UT-3:Curtis(R, elected Nov. 7, 2017)
Retirements as of January 2019 (Republicans):
AZ-2:Martha McSally
CA-49:Darrell Issa
FL-6:Ron DeSantis
FL-15:Dennis Ross
FL-17:Tom Rooney
FL-27:Ileana Ros-Lehtinen
ID-1:Raul Labrador
IN-4:Todd Rokita
IN-6:Luke Messer
KS-2:Lynn Jenkins
MI-11:Dave Trott
MS-3:Gregg Harper
NH-1:Carol Shea-Porter
NJ-2:Frank LoBiondo
NJ-11:Rodney Frelinghuysen
NM-2:Steve Pearce
NY-27:Chris Collins
NC-9:Robert Pittenger
ND-0:Kevin Cramer
OH-16:Jim Renacci
OK-1:Jim Bridenstine
PA-6:Ryan Costello
PA-7:Pat Meehan
PA-9:Bill Shuster
PA-11:Lou Barletta
PA-15:Charlie Dent
PA-18:Tim Murphy
SC-1:Mark Sanford
SC-4:Trey Gowdy
SC-5:Mick Mulvaney
SD-0:Kristi Noem
TN-2:Jimmy Duncan
TN-6:Diane Black
TN-7:Marsha Blackburn
TX-2:Ted PoeTX02'>2
TX-3:Sam Johnson
TX-5:Jeb Hensarling
TX-6:Joe Barton
TX-21:Lamar Smith
TX-27:Blake Farenthold
UT-3:Jason Chaffetz
VA-5:Tom Garrett
VA-6:Bob Goodlatte
WA-8:Dave Reichert
WV-3:Evan Jenkins
WI-1:Paul Ryan
Retirements as of January 2019 (Democrats):
AZ-9:Kyrsten Sinema
CO-2:Jared Polis
CT-5:Elizabeth Esty
HI-1:Colleen Hanabusa
IL-4:Luis Gutierrez
MD-6:John Delaney
MA-3:Niki Tsongas
MI-9:Sander Levin
MN-1:Tim Walz
MN-5:Keith Ellison
MN-8:Rick Nolan
NV-3:Jacky Rosen
NV-4:Ruben Kihuen
NM-1:Michelle Lujan-Grisham
PA-1:Bob Brady
TX-16:Beto O'Rourke
TX-29:Gene Green

Challengers for November 2018 (Democrats):
DE-0:Rochester(D)
KY-6:McGrath(D)
MA-7:Pressley(D)
MI-13:Brenda Jones
MI-13:Rashida Tlaib

Challengers for November 2018 (Republicans):
CA-49:Rocky Chavez
HI-1:Cam Cavasso
ID-1:Russ Fulcher
NV-3:Danny Tarkanian
OH-12:Troy Balderson
PA-14:Rick Saccone
PA-16:Lloyd Smucker
PA-18:Rick Saccone
SC-4:Lee Bright
SC-5:Pope(R)
TX-27:Michael Cloud
UT-3:John Curtis
WA-8:Dino Rossi
Abortion
Budget/Economy
Civil Rights
Corporations
Crime
Drugs
Education
Energy/Oil
Environment
Families
Foreign Policy
Free Trade
Govt. Reform
Gun Control
Health Care
Homeland Security
Immigration
Jobs
Principles
Social Security
Tax Reform
Technology
War/Peace
Welfare/Poverty

Vacancies for November 2018 election:
MI-13:Conyers(D, resigned in sex scandal)
NY-25:Slaughter(D, deceased March 2018)
OK-1:Bridenstine(R; resigned to head NASA)
PA-7:Meehan(R, resigned in sex scandal)
PA-15:Dent(R; resigned May 2018)


Candidate Information:
Main Page
Profile
HI politicians
 
Search for...





Page last updated: Aug 27, 2018