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Dan Quayle on Principles & Values

Vice President of the U.S., 1989-1993; Former Republican Senator (IN)


1988: Why VP? young, Midwestern, and good on defense

In selecting [Quayle for VP], George thought he could bridge the gender gap by giving female voters someone he said "looked like a Robert Redford look-alike."

Quayle was a liability from the beginning. In his 1st press conference, the young senator stumbled over questions about whether his family used any undue influence to get him a slot in the National Guard. At first he denied influence was used. Later he said he didn't know. Finally he admitted that some phone calls were made.

Resisting pleas to remove him from the ticket, George stood by his choice but regretted having made it. He confided that disaster to his diary: "It was my decision, and I blew it, but I'm not about to say that I blew it."

Even George's closest friends said to George, "How in God's name did you select Quayle? George told me he'd only met Quayle once or twice. Quayle was good on defense issues. George needed someone young and from the Midwest, so Quayle was in. That's as much thought as he gave to it."

Source: The Family, by Kitty Kelley, p.460-461 , Sep 14, 2004

1988 V.P. debate opponent: "You're no Jack Kennedy"

As VP candidate in 1988, the young man kept comparing himself to John F. Kennedy. When Quayle drew the comparison in his debate with Dukakis's running mate, Senator Lloyd Bentsen was ready.

QUAYLE: It's not just age; it's accomplishments, it's experience. I have far more experience than many others that sought the office of vice president of this country. I have as much experience in the Congress as Jack Kennedy did when he sought the presidency...

BENTSEN: Senator, I served with Jack Kennedy. I knew Jack Kennedy. Jack Kennedy was a friend of mine. Senator, you're no Jack Kennedy.

Source: The Family, by Kitty Kelley, p.462 , Sep 14, 2004

Murphy Brown episode was about helping single mothers

[In a speech following the L.A. riots], I expressed concern over how “a single mother raising her children in the ghetto. has an impossible task.” That remark came pages before the single sentence that would create the real ideological firestorm of my vice-presidency: “It doesn’t help matters when prime-time TV has Murphy Brown-a character who supposedly epitomizes today’s intelligent, highly paid, professional woman-mocking the importance of fathers, by bearing a child alone, and calling it just another ‘lifestyle choice.’“

Although I’d sometimes glanced at it, I had never seen a whole episode of Murphy Brown. Even so, the reference was my idea. I knew the line would be controversial. Just how controversial, I couldn’t predict.

What distressed me about [the reaction] was the sense that I had attacked single mothers. If anything, I was trying to be their champion, to point out the distinction between real life and what was being shown on Murphy Brown.

Source: Standing Firm, by Dan Quayle, p.352-59 , Jul 2, 1994

Smaller govt; bigger defense; stronger families

[The bases for Quayle’s campaign are]: Lower taxes, smaller government, a bolstered defense and stronger families. Major issues facing the country are the decline in the values that parents try to teach their children, a middle-class tax squeeze, education, and a rudderless foreign policy.
Source: Associated Press; Reuters News Service , Jul 2, 1999

A “poverty of values” causes many social ills

America faces overwhelming social challenges today, from drug abuse and teen pregnancy to crime. The root cause is a poverty of values: fractured families cannot pass along to children the core values that allow for happy, productive lives. Dan Quayle believes we must roll back this assault on our middle-class values. Big government is not the solution. To address what ails our nation, we must first strengthen America’s families. We must promote policies that help, not harm, the family.
Source: www.quayle2000.com/ “Stronger Families”, 5/19/99 , May 19, 1999

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Other past presidents on Principles & Values: Dan Quayle on other issues:
Former Presidents:
George W. Bush(R,2001-2009)
Bill Clinton(D,1993-2001)
George Bush Sr.(R,1989-1993)
Ronald Reagan(R,1981-1989)
Jimmy Carter(D,1977-1981)
Gerald Ford(R,1974-1977)
Richard Nixon(R,1969-1974)
Lyndon Johnson(D,1963-1969)
John F. Kennedy(D,1961-1963)
Dwight Eisenhower(R,1953-1961)
Harry S Truman(D,1945-1953)

Past Vice Presidents:
V.P.Dick Cheney
V.P.Al Gore
V.P.Dan Quayle
Sen.Bob Dole
V.P.Walter Mondale

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Page last updated: Mar 16, 2014