State of Washington Archives: on Technology


Creigh Deeds: Commission to craft a comprehensive transportation package

More than 4,000 bridges are structurally deficient, we can't keep up with basic maintenance of roads, and there is almost no state money for new road construction or rail & transit improvements.

We all largely agree about what's needed to fix our infrastructure. Where my opponent and I disagree is how to accomplish those improvements. I believe we should use the only approach that has succeeded in the past two decades.

The last time Virginia passed meaningful transportation funding was in 1986, under Gov. Baliles, who created a commission to provide recommendations and build support for financing. Since then, each time a governor has presented a proposal to raise meaningful transportation revenue, it has failed.

The day after I'm elected, I will begin assembling a bipartisan commission to craft a comprehensive transportation package. Like Gov. Baliles did, I will appoint Republicans, Democrats and independents along with private-sector leaders and transportation experts.

Source: Creigh Deeds editorial in Washington Post Sep 23, 2009

Hillary Clinton: Fight for interoperable communications for first responders

We have been fighting for interoperable communications since September 12. We have put in legislation. We’ve asked for more money, but when firefighters can’t talk to police officers, when emergency responders can’t talk to each other, we not only saw it on September 11, we saw it again during Hurricane Katrina. What was a natural disaster was turned into a national disgrace, and we need to get the funds directly where they are needed.
Source: 2007 IAFF Presidential Forum in Washington DC Mar 14, 2007

John McCain: Provide unused spectrum to emergency officials

Some of us in Congress have tried for several years to provide unused spectrum to police, firefighters and other emergency officials without, I am sorry to report, success. With all the technological advances of recent years, why is it that those on whom we depend when disasters strike are still unable to communicate with each other during an emergency, while we are able to watch the crisis unfold on our televisions? It’s because public officials have yet to get serious about developing and funding a safety communications system for all local, state and federal first responders.

Government needs to develop a comprehensive, interoperable emergency communications plan and set equipment standards, fund emergency and interoperable communications equipment, and provide the radio spectrum that will allow communicating over long distances using the same frequencies and equipment. We should have done it years ago. We must do it now before disaster, man made or natural, strikes us again.

Source: 2007 IAFF Presidential Forum in Washington DC Mar 14, 2007

Dick Gephardt: Using raw census numbers disenfranchises minorities

Commerce Secretary Evans said yesterday that he-not the census director-will decide how to tally the 2000 Census. At issue is whether redistricting should be based on raw numbers from the census or figures that have been adjusted to compensate for people who were missed-disproportionately the poor. Gephardt said, “The secretary’s action is a perilous step toward disenfranchising the estimated millions of minorities, children and rural residents who were not counted by the 2000 Census.”
Source: D’Vera Cohn, Washington Post, Page A12 Feb 17, 2001

Donald Evans: Census redistricting will be based on Evan’s (GOP) figures

Commerce Secretary Evans said yesterday that he-not the census director-will decide how to tally the 2000 Census, virtually ensuring that Republicans will prevail in the bitter dispute over which set of population figures is released to states for redrawing political boundaries.

Evans’s decision, which triggered strong criticism from Democrats, revoked a Clinton administration policy that put the politically charged decision in the hands of the census director. At issue is whether redistricting should be based on raw numbers from the census or figures that have been adjusted to compensate for people who were missed-disproportionately minorities, immigrants and the poor. Evans said he would seek advice from career Census Bureau officials and others, but he is widely expected to decide against adjustment.

With states due to receive redistricting data next month, the decision must be made soon. Because control of the US House hinges on only a few seats, the political stakes are high.

Source: D’Vera Cohn, Washington Post, Page A12 Feb 17, 2001

George W. Bush: No “virtual people” in census; use raw numbers

At issue [with the census] is whether redistricting should be based on raw numbers from the census or figures that have been adjusted to compensate for people who were missed-disproportionately minorities, immigrants and the poor. President Bush has said he prefers raw numbers to adjusted figures, which Republicans say would add “virtual people” for Democratic gain. Democrats, civil rights groups and many city officials, though, say adjustment would guarantee equal political representation.
Source: D’Vera Cohn, Washington Post, Page A12 Feb 17, 2001

Al Gore: $33B for new R&D tax credit; more privacy protection on-line

Gore argued that the technology-driven growth of the 1990s could be stopped in its tracks by a return to the policies of the 1980s.Gore called for making permanent the tax credit for research & development-a proposal long advanced by Silicon Valley entrepreneurs and technology companies. The changes would cost $33 billion over 10 years. He also proposed to double federal research in information technology over the next five years and all medical research over the next seven years.

At the same time, Gore promised that, if he is elected, the government will keep its “hands off” the Internet, with “no burdensome regulations, no new tariffs on Internet transmissions, and a moratorium on taxes on the Internet.”

The only area where Gore outlined a stepped-up government role was in protecting individual privacy, where he said he would fight for new laws to keep personal medical and financial records private.

Source: Dan Balz, Washington Post, p. A10 Oct 28, 2000

Joseph Lieberman: Overcome organizational barriers to e-Government

    Progress of electronic government at the federal level has been inconsistent; some agencies are well ahead of the game, but many are lagging. What are the key impediments to progress?
  1. Organizational Leadership: I support a Federal Chief Information Officer, or “IT Czar”.
  2. Integrated Service Delivery: “One-Stop Shopping” for delivering services to the customer, without regard to where the jurisdiction of one agency stops and another begins.
  3. Standards for Interoperability: we need to become more effective in adopting and implementing electronic compatibility.
  4. Interagency Funding Mechanisms: e-Government requires collaboration in funding-at the very least, collaboration in interagency pilot projects.
  5. A Sense of Urgency: Finally, a gulf in perception seems to exist between the e-Government “insiders” and the government decision-makers. The insiders [should] educate the policy-makers on the necessary sense of urgency regarding e-Government.
Source: Speech on “E-Gov 2000” in Washington DC Jul 12, 2000

George W. Bush: Fewer strings to obtain technology for schools

program, which seeks to wire schools and libraries. Under Bush’s plan, schools also would be able to spend the money to purchase computer hardware and software, and pay for teacher training. Bush said the top concern in his administration would not be how many schools “are wired, but what are children learning.
Source: Terry M. Neal, Washington Post page A06 Jun 20, 2000

Al Gore: Tighten privacy protections over medical information

In an effort to outlaw discrimination based on genetic makeup, Gore is proposing legislation to tighten privacy protections over medical information. Gore said yesterday that “unless we pass these protections, then there are going to be an awful lot of people who will not go and get the tests done.” Gore said people fear that the genetic tests might show they need treatments that could cause problems with their group health plans or could lead to other workplace discrimination. He said there is strong bipartisan support for medical privacy protections and the ban on genetic discrimination. The Clinton administration this year banned federal agencies from using genetic testing to deny jobs or promotions to their workers.
Source: Mark Kaufman of the Washington Post, in Boston Globe, p. A7 May 29, 2000

George W. Bush: Census long form is intrusive; not sure he’d fill it out

George W. Bush said yesterday he was not sure he would fill out the census long form if he were asked to. Bush stopped short of advising people not to fill out their census forms. He said, “If they’re worried about the government intruding into their personal lives, they ought to think about it.” He added, “We want as accurate a count as possible, but I can understand why people don’t want to give over that information to the government. If I have the long form, I’m not so sure I would do it either.”
Source: D’Vera Cohn, Washington Post, p. A1 Mar 31, 2000

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Secy.Hillary Clinton(NY)
V.P.Joe Biden(DE)
Gov.Andrew Cuomo(NY)
Mayor Rahm Emanuel(IL)
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Dr.Ben Carson(MD)
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Sen.Rob Portman(OH)
Secy.Condi Rice(CA)
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Rep.Paul Ryan(WI)
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