State of Oklahoma Archives: on Government Reform


Matt Silverstein: Not a dime from any lobbyists in campaign donations

Sen. Jim Inhofe banked nearly $787,000 for his re-election campaign from July through September, while Democratic challenger Matt Silverstein topped $100,000 in his first full quarter of fundraising. The senator's haul included more than $152,000 from political action committees.

"We still have over a year to go and we will continue to gain steam," Silverstein said in a statement. "We're also proud we haven't taken a dime from any lobbyists."

Source: The Oklahoman on 2014 Oklahoma Senate debate Oct 25, 2013

Rick Weiland: Voluntarily limit campaign contributions to maximum of $100

Weiland said, "Mike Rounds has now caved in twice, to big money by boasting he will raise $9 million from out of state big money sources, and also to the extreme right wing of the GOP by supporting Ted Cruz's blackmail scheme [shutting down] the United States government. I call on him to explain why he has thrown his lot in with Cruz and the extremists when his entire career, until he decided he had to pander to win a primary election, was in opposition to the kind of big money extremism he has now embraced," Weiland said.

At the beginning of his campaign, Weiland issued a pledge to Rounds asking him to agree to limit contributions to both campaigns to a maximum of $100. Rounds refused the pledge and also turned down Weiland's offer to meet with him to discuss ways in which they could reduce the impact of big money on the race.

Source: AdWatch: Weiland campaign email: 2014 Oklahoma Senate debate Oct 15, 2013

Matt Silverstein: Inhofe says he's for term limits, but was in for 26 years

As Silverstein spoke about Inhofe, it was increasingly clear that he was painting him as an unprincipled "creature of Washington" whose seemingly self-serving principles are troubling to voters, while at the same time being increasingly out of touch with the everyday needs of 21st century Oklahomans.

"Jim Inhofe has been on the taxpayer's payroll since 1967," noted Silverstein. "He is now asking for 26 years in the US Senate, the entire time saying he supports term limits for politicians."

Source: RedDirtReport.com coverage of 2014 Oklahoma Senate race Aug 13, 2013

Jim Bridenstine: First Amendment includes campaign spending

Q: Do you support the regulation of indirect campaign contributions from corporations and unions?

A: No. The First Amendment prohibits any infringement on free speech. People have the right to spend their own money as they wish to support political campaigns. Corporations and unions should be able to make direct and indirect contributions to campaigns. However, those contributions and the identities of the entities receiving them must be disclosed. No corporate or union funds derived from union dues or other payments compulsory as a condition of employment should be eligible as a source of direct or indirect campaign contributions.

Source: Oklahoma Congressional 2012 Political Courage Test Oct 30, 2012

Brad Henry: Extend early voting to a full week prior to Election Day

No freedom is more precious than the right to vote. Government of the people and for the people requires participation by the people. Record voter turnouts across the nation last November were cause for celebration, but long lines and discouraging waits were cause for concern.

Early in-person voting has been hugely successful in Oklahoma and other states. I call on you to help boost voter participation by making it easier and more convenient for our citizens to vote. Let's extend early voting in our state by four days, allowing voters to cast their votes for a full week prior to Election Day.

Source: 2009 State of the State address to Oklahoma legislature Mar 2, 2009

Andrew Rice: Most donations from individuals; most of Inhofeís from PACs

Q: In terms of fund-raising, does money for your campaign come more from groups and organizations, or is it from individual donors?

A: The overwhelming majority is from individuals. The only type of group that could give us money is a Political Action Committee, and I think itís accounted for less than 4%. Part of that is the nature of how these campaigns are. When you run against an incumbent, thereís a lot of political action committees that represent different industries, different interest groups that arenít going to go against the incumbent because they donít want to upset the incumbent. Therefore, they may have a bill thatís coming that affects, say, the manufactures, and they want to go see them, and you know. Itís too bad that works, but thatís the way that Washington works. And so, if you look at his [Inhofeís] reports, heís got a tremendous amount of money in PAC money. Probably about half of his money comes from PAC money, compared to a real small minority of mine.

Source: Judd Morse, Ada Evening News on 2008 Oklahoma Senate Debate Jul 9, 2008

Frank Keating: Attract people to Oklahoma to regain Congressional seat

I would like to discuss the result and the challenges of the result of the loss of the congressional seat. In 1908, we had eight representatives, and then it was seven, and then it was six, and now it is five. People move to a place because they see it as prosperity filled and business friendly. They move away from a state because they donít see it as prosperity filled and business friendly. Or they donít go to a state, in sufficient numbers, to permit us to be truly competitive with the states around us. But this year, our agenda must be to get our congressman back. That is our agenda for the 2001 session.

Today, we have one overriding goal: To make Oklahoma so prosperous, so attractive, so energetic, so reform minded, so desirable for business location for people and companies and jobs, that we will reclaim our congressional seat in 2011 and add one more. That is our agenda for the year 2001. We are going to get our congressman back.

Source: 2001 State of the State address to Oklahoma legislature Feb 5, 2001

Winona LaDuke: Supports increased party choices for voters

Q: Why are you running for Vice-President on the Green Party ticket?

A: Because people make bad decisions in Washington D.C. Those decisions affect Indian people, and all people, in ways that we are not aware of. I believe in the goals of Ralph Nader and the Green Party because we have essentially a one-party system where all of us are ruled by corporate interests and we have less and less actual voice in how decisions are made.

Source: Interview in Oklahoma Indian Times Jun 1, 2000

  • The above quotations are from State of Oklahoma Politicians: Archives.
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Page last updated: Apr 20, 2014