State of New York Archives: on Principles & Values


Scott Walker: My relationship with God drives every major decision

It is Walker's biography that could make him especially attractive to Christian conservatives. A life story that began in the Baptist churches his father led in Colorado, Iowa and Wisconsin continues today at the nondenominational evangelical church he attends in his hometown. "My relationship with God drives every major decision in my life," Walker said in an emailed statement. While that relationship does not direct his daily decisions, he said, "our walk of faith helps us prepare for those decisions and provides us comfort as we seek to do God's will."

During his political rise in Wisconsin, Walker did not often emphasize his faith. But evangelicals make up nearly 60% of Republican caucusgoers in Iowa. They are an important factor in Southern primaries. And they continue to have an outsize influence on the Republican nominating process.

Source: N. Y. Times on 2015 Iowa Faith & Freedom Coalition summit Apr 1, 2015

Scott Walker: Raised as a "P.K.", Pastor's Kid, by his father Pastor Llew

Walker was raised a dutiful "P.K.," or pastor's kid. Walker's father, the Rev. Llewellyn S. Walker, was a minister in the American Baptist Churches USA, a more pluralistic denomination than the conservative and better-known Southern Baptist Convention. Pastor Llew, as he was known, is a Republican, but politics and the social causes of the day did not animate his First Baptist Church in Delavan, Wis., where Walker lived from age 10 until he left for college. His father was foremost "a caregiver to the congregation," said the church's current pastor. He would spend half a day sitting in the hospital room of an ailing church member, praying and shooting the breeze.

Before the elder Walker retired in 1995, at the age of 56, he struggled with depression. His wife, Pat, and the teenage Scott Walker shouldered some of his pastoral duties. "There were Sundays when Scott would preach the sermon," the current pastor said.

Source: N. Y. Times on 2015 Iowa Faith & Freedom Coalition summit Apr 1, 2015

Martin O`Malley: History celebrates courage, not triangulation

Martin O'Malley took a veiled shot at Hillary Clinton in a speech criticizing the politics of "triangulation" that have historically been associated with the Clintons: "The most fundamental power of our party and our country is the power of our moral principles," O'Malley said.

In words that echoed those of Senator Barack Obama when he battled Clinton in 2007 for the Democratic nomination, O'Malley added: "Triangulation is not a strategy that will move America forward. History celebrates profiles in courage, not profiles in convenience."

The politics of triangulation is a phrase often used to describe former President Bill Clinton's brand of centrism. It has also been used to criticize Hillary Clinton as overly poll driven, and liberals have long used it as a cudgel. In a pivotal Democratic primary speech in November 2007 in Iowa, Obama deployed "triangulation" as an attack line against Mrs. Clinton.

Source: N. Y. Times 2015 coverage of 2016 presidential hopefuls Mar 1, 2015

Jason Carter: Grandfather Jimmy Carter participates in grandson's campaign

Democrats lost the Georgia statehouse in 2002, and the once Solid South is a distant memory for their party. It has been four decades since the elder Mr. Carter was governor, and more than three since he left the White House--"involuntarily retired," he likes to say. "Mr. Jimmy," as locals know him, is a revered figure here. But the former president arouses intense passions among conservatives, who detest his politics. Republicans lampoon him as a failed leader.

Senator Carter is the son of Jack Carter, the eldest of Jimmy and Rosalynn's four children. Like his grandfather, he is seeking the governorship after just four years in the State Senate.

"He wants it both ways," said one supporter of Gov. Deal. "He wants his granddaddy's help with contributors, but when it comes to the issues, he distances himself. My guess is if his last name were Jones, you and I might not be having this conversation."

Source: N. Y. Times on 2014 Georgia gubernatorial race Jul 26, 2014

Tom Cotton: Served in military, academia, and as management consultant

Ben Sasse and Tom Cotton have a lot in common: Republican candidacies for the Senate, Ivy League advanced degrees--a Yale PhD for Sasse, a Harvard law degree for Cotton--and a tour of duty in the white-shoe world of management consulting. One more thing: They are running as common-man conservatives from the heartland under the banner of the Tea Party.

The resumes of Sasse (R, NE) and Cotton (D, AR) do not exactly fit the profile of populists. That is especially true for the lines dedicated to the Boston Consulting Group and McKinsey & Company, firms that advise corporations on strategy, efficiency and ways to increase profitability.

Most of Cotton's adult life has been in academia and the military, and he has spent a year in Congress. His time at McKinsey was also barely more than a year, during which time his group leader immersed him in the intricacies--and the value--of the Affordable Care Act.

Source: N. Y. Times on 2014 Arkansas Senate race May 17, 2014

Joe DioGuardi: Gillibrand had a 2-year tryout; now give me a 2-year tryout

Gillibrand said she wouldn't change the appointment process that made her an unelected U.S. Senator for nearly two years. Ms. Gillibrand was an upstate congresswoman when Gov. David Paterson picked her to fill the seat.

The two are competing to fill out the two years remaining on the Senate term of Hillary Clinton. "Sen. Gillibrand has had her two-year tryout and I believe she has flunked,'' DioGuardi said. "It's time to give Joe DioGuardi a two-year tryout.''

Source: Wall Street Journal coverage of 2010 N. Y. Senate debate Oct 22, 2010

Joe DioGuardi: Accused of making deals in a $1.7 billion Ponzi scheme

DioGuardi accused Gillibrand of shilling for Big Tobacco, while Gillibrand expressed "serious questions" over reports that federal regulators were investigating his ties to a business deal.

"This is a complete fabrication & a misrepresentation of who I am," DioGuardi said. DioGuardi insisted he was merely a bit player in the deal described by a Gillibrand ad as a "Madoff-style $1.7 billion Ponzi scheme."

He returned fire by highlighting defense work Gillibrand did as an attorney for tobacco giant Philip Morris in the 1990s. "She was actually the architect of everything that company did to try to hide the fact that cigarettes cause cancer," he said.

"Your arguments are absolutely fantasy," Gillibrand scoffed. The senator characterized her tobacc work as something she got stuck with when she was "a junior associate in a big firm."

She pointed out that DioGuardi, too, had represented Big Tobacco, as an accountant. DioGuardi objected, and she shot back: "Oh, so you didn't choose your clients?"

Source: New York Post coverage of 2010 N. Y. Senate debate Oct 16, 2010

Kirsten Gillibrand: Accused of hiding facts connecting cigarettes and cancer

The pair traded their toughest blows over jobs each had held outside public office. DioGuardi accused Gillibrand of shilling for Big Tobacco, while Gillibrand expressed "serious questions" over reports that federal regulators were investigating his ties to a business deal. DioGuardi insisted he was merely a bit player in the deal described by a Gillibrand ad as a "Madoff-style $1.7 billion Ponzi scheme."

He returned fire by highlighting defense work Gillibrand did as an attorney for tobacco giant Philip Morris in the 1990s. "She was actually the architect of everything that company did to try to hide the fact that cigarettes cause cancer," he said.

"Your arguments are absolutely fantasy," Gillibrand scoffed. The senator characterized her tobacc work as something she got stuck with when she was "a junior associate in a big firm."

She pointed out that DioGuardi, too, had represented Big Tobacco, as an accountant. DioGuardi objected, and she shot back: "Oh, so you didn't choose your clients?"

Source: New York Post coverage of 2010 N. Y. Senate debate Oct 16, 2010

Charles Schumer: 1998: demanded 10 debates; 2010: declined all debates

Jay Townsend is trying to set up a debate with his Democratic opponent, even if it's a cardboard proxy. Townsend today called out to a cardboard cutout of incumbent Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., requesting that the real version take up one of the five debates he said several media outlets had requested the two have.

After reading off an anecdote about Schumer calling for multiple debates against his opponent Al D'Amato in 1998, Townsend, a marketing executive, said "if 10 debates was right for Sen. Schumer in 1998, I would think at least one is appropriate in the year 2010."

"I do believe New Yorkers are entitled to hear a vigorous exchange of our view," he said after declaring that this year's elections will determine the destiny of the country. While Schumer's refusal to engage in a debate with Townsend is a major focus of his campaign, he said that it is not defined by it. "I'll be happy to debate the imaginary Chuck if I have to," said Townsend, eyeing the cutout beside him.

Source: Politics-on-the-Hudson coverage of 2010 N. Y. Senate debate Oct 7, 2010

Jay Townsend: Will debate cardboard cutout of incumbent Schumer

Jay Townsend is trying to set up a debate with his Democratic opponent, even if it's a cardboard proxy. Townsend today called out to a cardboard cutout of incumbent Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., requesting that the real version take up one of the five debates he said several media outlets had requested the two have.

After reading off an anecdote about Schumer calling for multiple debates against his opponent Al D'Amato in 1998, Townsend, a marketing executive, said "if 10 debates was right for Sen. Schumer in 1998, I would think at least one is appropriate in the year 2010."

"I do believe New Yorkers are entitled to hear a vigorous exchange of our view," he said after declaring that this year's elections will determine the destiny of the country. While Schumer's refusal to engage in a debate with Townsend is a major focus of his campaign, he said that it is not defined by it. "I'll be happy to debate the imaginary Chuck if I have to," said Townsend, eyeing the cutout beside him.

Source: Politics-on-the-Hudson coverage of 2010 N. Y. Senate debate Oct 7, 2010

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