State of Montana Archives: on Tax Reform


Steve Bullock: $400 personal rebate instead of $100M property tax cut

Let's never allow misinformation to be the motivation for missteps. I propose returning $100 million back to the pockets of Montana homeowners. Others have suggested we should use that $100 million and provide property tax cuts, instead. The difference between the tax rebate and tax cut is simple: who stands to benefit?

Giving $100 million back in the form of a tax rebate will return $400 to everyone with their primary residence in the state. If you take the $100 million and use it to cut property taxes, instead, the average Montana homeowner would receive just $44 this year, not $400. Think about that--it will take 10 years for the taxpayer to get as much money back as they'll get this year with the rebate.

Yet, if you are a company like PP&L, the proposed tax cut would reward you with over $1 million this year alone--23,000 times more than what the average homeowner would receive. If we consider who stands to benefit from our actions, the path we should take becomes clear.

Source: 2013 State of the State Address to Montana legislature Jan 30, 2013

Champ Edmunds: Eliminate income taxes and corporate taxes

Source: Montana Legislative Election 2012 Political Courage Test Nov 1, 2012

Dennis Rehberg: End the inheritance tax completely

[The debate] marked yet another tired back-and-forth on the estate tax, referred to by conservatives as the "death tax." Tester favors extending the Bush-era tax cut exemption for couples inheriting estates worth less than $10 million; Rehberg wants to deep-six the tax completely. The discussion between the candidates didn't, and never has, addressed the fact that, according to a study conducted by a trio of IRS researchers, only two to three percent of all deaths in the U.S. were subject to estate taxation even under the Clinton-era exemption of $1 million. In 1998, only 50,089 of the 103,892 people who filed estate tax returns actually paid any taxes. That's the type of fact we'd like to see dropped in a debate like this.
Source: Missoula News on 2012 Montana Senate debate Oct 22, 2012

Jon Tester: Extend Bush exemption for inheritance tax up to $10M

[The debate] marked yet another tired back-and-forth on the estate tax, referred to by conservatives as the "death tax." Tester favors extending the Bush-era tax cut exemption for couples inheriting estates worth less than $10 million; Rehberg wants to deep-six the tax completely. The discussion between the candidates didn't, and never has, addressed the fact that, according to a study conducted by a trio of IRS researchers, only two to three percent of all deaths in the U.S. were subject to estate taxation even under the Clinton-era exemption of $1 million. In 1998, only 50,089 of the 103,892 people who filed estate tax returns actually paid any taxes. That's the type of fact we'd like to see dropped in a debate like this.
Source: Missoula News on 2012 Montana Senate debate Oct 22, 2012

Dennis Rehberg: We need tax certainty ; make Bush tax cuts permanent

When asked about the so-called Bush tax cuts expiring on Jan. 1, a date that has been called "Taxmaggedon," Rehberg responded that he would vote to repeal the Affordable Care Act and make the tax cuts of 2001 and 2003 permanent. He cited a need for tax certainty in the country.

Tester didn't address the tax increases directly, but did say that that "House and Senate need to come together with a major proposal that reduces our debt."

Source: Daily Inter Lake on 2012 Montana Senate debates Oct 14, 2012

Dennis Rehberg: Eliminate the death tax entirely

Asked about an inheritance tax being reinstated on Jan. 1, Tester said he favors having an exemption for the first $5 million in inheritance. Rehberg said he favors eliminating the "death tax" entirely.
Source: Daily Inter Lake on 2012 Montana Senate debates Oct 14, 2012

Jon Tester: Limit inheritance tax to estates over $5 million

Asked about an inheritance tax being reinstated on Jan. 1, Tester said he favors having an exemption for the first $5 million in inheritance. Rehberg said he favors eliminating the "death tax" entirely.
Source: Daily Inter Lake on 2012 Montana Senate debates Oct 14, 2012

Michael Lange: Permanently repeal the federal estate tax

Q: Do you support the permanent repeal of the federal estate tax?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support requiring the federal budget to be balanced each year?

A: Yes.

Source: Montana Congressional Election 2008 Political Courage Test Nov 1, 2008

Conrad Burns: Bush tax cuts actually more progressive Clinton tax hikes

We got to make the tax cuts permanent. Because if we do not, in the year 2011, your tax obligation to the fed govt will go up, on a family of four making $64,000, it will go up 58%. The new tax cut was more progressive than Mr. Clintonís tax increases. If you want to tax the rich-- thatís what they want to do, itís class warfare! Those folks making $184,000 or more a year pay 84% of the income taxes paid into the national treasury. Under Mr. Clinton, they paid 82%. So weíre actually more progressive.
Source: 2006 Montana 3-way Senate Debate at MSU Oct 9, 2006

Judy Martz: No tax increase without voter referendum

I want to be crystal clear. I promised the people of Montana that I would not support a tax increase. I will keep my word. If the people of Montana want tax increases, Iíll respect their decision made in voting booth -- but I will not sign a general tax increase. Period.

We must lower the top marginal tax rates that are bad for business. We must eliminate income taxes for the hardworking Montanans on the lowest rung of the economic ladder. The business equipment tax must be eliminated.

Source: 2001 State of the State Address to Montana Legislature Jan 25, 2001

Corey Stapleton: No flat tax; no super-majority; yes to sales tax

Q: Do you support a flat tax structure for state income taxes?

A: No.

Q: Would you support returning any operating surplus to Montana taxpayers?

A: Yes.

Q: Would you support placing any operating surplus into a "rainy day" fund?

A: No.

Q: Should the state reimburse local governments for revenues lost due to state-mandated property tax cuts?

A: No.

Q: Do you support giving cities and counties the ability to enact local sales taxes with voter approval?

A: No.

Q: Do you support requiring a two-thirds vote by lawmakers to approve any new or increased tax or fee?

A: No.

Q: Do you support implementing a state sales tax?

A: Yes.

Source: 2000 Montana State National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2000

John Bohlinger: Replace property taxes with a 4% retail sales tax

When elected to the State Senate, I will introduce legislation that will constitutionally eliminate taxes on one's dwelling place, not commercial properties. I will eliminate taxes on business equipment, in another bill and replace the lost revenue to State Government with a 4% retail sales tax--the sales tax bill will omit from taxation food items purchased in grocery stores and drugs.
Source: Montana Legislative 1998 National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 1998

  • The above quotations are from State of Montana Politicians: Archives.
  • Click here for definitions & background information on Tax Reform.
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2012 Presidential contenders on Tax Reform:
  Democrats:
Pres.Barack Obama(IL)
V.P.Joe Biden(DE)

Republicans:
Gov.Mitt Romney(MA)
Rep.Paul Ryan(WI)
Third Parties:
Green: Dr.Jill Stein(MA)
Libertarian: Gov.Gary Johnson(NM)
Justice: Mayor Rocky Anderson(UT)
Constitution: Rep.Virgil Goode(VA)
Peace+Freedom: Roseanne Barr(HI)
Reform Party: André Barnett(NY)
AmericansElect: Gov.Buddy Roemer(LA)
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Page last updated: Dec 16, 2013