State of Montana Archives: on Energy & Oil


John Walsh: Energy boom in Montana instead of foreign oil dependence

[At a trade mission luncheon in Australia] Walsh noted that in the future, it would be in America's best interest not to be dependent on foreign oil or to have soldiers be in harm's way because of America's oil dependence on the Middle East.

"I can tell you that we're here today to celebrate the fact that Montana is open for business," Walsh said. "Eastern Montana is the land of opportunity. It is home to the biggest energy boom in America. That's something we can be proud of."

Source: Sydney (Australia) Herald on 2014 Montana Senate debates Nov 9, 2013

Steve Bullock: Develop our resources for American energy independence

Source: Montana Governor campaign 2012 website, www.stevebullock.com Nov 6, 2012

Dennis Rehberg: Help avoid closure of Billings coal-fired power plant

Tester touted his Forest Jobs and Recreation Act, which he said aims to increase logging and wilderness. Rehberg attacked Tester for letting down business groups who needed help dealing with burdensome environmental regulations. As a result, Rehberg blamed Tester for the closure of a coal-fired power plant near Billings. Tester countered that plant owner PPL Montana could pay for the environmental upgrades without compromising its profits.
Source: Billings Gazette on 2012 Montana Senate debates Oct 15, 2012

Dennis Rehberg: Cap-and-trade policy is an energy tax

Rehberg went after Tester for supporting the federal stimulus bill, cap-and-trade policies that he described as an "energy tax," and particularly the Affordable Care Act that he warned will eventually be implemented with costly "entitlements" of insurance premium subsidy and Medicaid expansion. Rehberg said, "I don't think government should be picking winners and losers. Government should be creating an environment of liberating Main Street."
Source: Daily Inter Lake on 2012 Montana Senate debates Oct 14, 2012

Michael Lange: Develop oil, coal, & nuclear production

Source: Montana Congressional Election 2008 Political Courage Test Nov 1, 2008

Conrad Burns: Agricultural oil sources reduce foreign energy dependence

Q: What are the most realistic alternative energy plans for Montana and America?

JONES: The cheapest electrical power is nuclear energy. We must re-institute nuclear power. Coal is another one. Montana is rich in coal, which can be liquefied into gasoline.

BURNS: Last year we passed an energy bill, and opened up some new areas for energy production. And we found more oil and we found more gas. In next yearís farm bill, agriculture will have a role in reducing our dependence on foreign energy, both in bio-diesel and ethanol plants. 11 million acres in Montana can produce more oil from oilseeds than the soybean folks in the Midwest. We must use those in our bio-diesels and bio-lubricants. Thatís what brings down the price of gasoline, when policies inject competition into the market.

TESTER: If I were not running for US Senate, on my farm, we would be crushing safflower, because Iíve run the numbers, and it works, and it provides a renewable energy source that makes sense.

Source: 2006 Montana 3-way Senate Debate at MSU Oct 9, 2006

Conrad Burns: Global warming has occurred since the Ice Age

Q: Your views on global climate change?

BURNS: Weíve been warming since the Ice Age, and that continues. Thatís a pretty well-known fact.

TESTER: The truth is, the polar ice cap is half as thick as it was in 1950. Yes, Earth is warming since the Ice Age, thatís correct, but itís warming much more rapidly now than it ever has in our history.

JONES: There is global warming; itís very slight; itís a recovery from whatís called the Little Ice Age, when the average temperatures were much lower. In the years 500AD to 1000AD, temperatures were much higher than they are right now. Global warming is a natural recovery, and is not harmful. Most of it is only happening in the northern hemisphere. Scientists have proven that carbon dioxide emissions contribute only about 5% of the total greenhouse gases. If we reduce that worldwide, do you think it will have a big impact no greenhouse gases? No it will not. This is a natural occurrence and we should not make any effort to change it.

Source: 2006 Montana 3-way Senate Debate at MSU Oct 9, 2006

Conrad Burns: Kyoto Accord hurts economy; focus on alternative fuels

Q: Should we ratify the Kyoto Accord, to restrict greenhouse gases?

BURNS: I would not. #1, it taxes the economy. And it doesnít get to the real folks that should have some way of controlling their greenhouse gases. Thatís the reason Iím a great believer in alternative fuels, and wind, and solar, and fuel cells. We have to do everything that we can do, and stay within the economy and keep it growing, to deal with greenhouse gases.

TESTER: Us pulling out of the Kyoto Accord is exactly whatís wrong. We need to have communication with folks around the world. This is a worldwide problem. I hope [global warming] is a glitch in the environment, but we need to treat it in case itís not. Our universities can be a big player in how we can sequester

Source: 2006 Montana 3-way Senate Debate at MSU Oct 9, 2006

Jon Tester: Agricultural oil sources are profitable and renewable

Q: What are the most realistic alternative energy plans for Montana and America?

JONES: The cheapest electrical power is nuclear energy. We must re-institute nuclear power. Coal is another one. Montana is rich in coal, which can be liquefied into gasoline. Government over-regulates the energy industry.

BURNS: Last year we opened up some new areas for energy production. And we found more oil and we found more gas. Thatís what brings down the price of gasoline, when policies inject competition into the market.

TESTER: Americaís energy independence is critically important, and we have a tremendous opportunity in Montana to help America become energy-independent. If I were not running for US Senate, on my farm, we would be crushing safflower, because Iíve run the numbers, and it works, and it provides a renewable energy source that makes sense. We did a lot of things in the last session to help promote bio-fuels and renewables and wind energy.

Source: 2006 Montana 3-way Senate Debate at MSU Oct 9, 2006

Jon Tester: Kyoto Accord needs worldwide communication & US leadership

Q: Should we ratify the Kyoto Accord, to restrict greenhouse gases?

BURNS: No; it doesnít get to the real folks that should have some way of controlling their greenhouse gases. Thatís the reason Iím a great believer in alternative fuels. We have to do everything that we can do, [but] stay within the economy growing.

TESTER: Us pulling out of the Kyoto Accord is exactly whatís wrong. We need to have communication with folks around the world. This is a worldwide problem. I hope [global warming] is a glitch in the environment, but we need to treat it in case itís not. Iíd point out that, with the exception of wind and solar, you still have carbon emissions from other renewables, like biofuels and ethanol. Our universities can be a big player in how we can sequester carbon, and solve this carbon issue. We can solve this problem but itís going to take some research dollars, and some commitment, and some leadership. The folks that are there canít do it. We need a change.

Source: 2006 Montana 3-way Senate Debate at MSU Oct 9, 2006

Jon Tester: Global warming is much more rapid now than historically

Q: Your views on global climate change?

BURNS: Weíve been warming since the Ice Age, and that continues. Thatís a pretty well-known fact.

TESTER: The truth is, the polar ice cap is half as thick as it was in 1950. Yes, Earth is warming since the Ice Age, thatís correct, but itís warming much more rapidly now than it ever has in our history.

JONES: There is global warming; itís very slight; itís a recovery from whatís called the Little Ice Age, when the average temperatures were much lower. In the years 500AD to 1000AD, temperatures were much higher than they are right now. Global warming is a natural recovery, and is not harmful. Most of it is only happening in the northern hemisphere. Scientists have proven that carbon dioxide emissions contribute only about 5% of the total greenhouse gases. If we reduce that worldwide, do you think it will have a big impact no greenhouse gases? No it will not. This is a natural occurrence and we should not make any effort to change it.

Source: 2006 Montana 3-way Senate Debate at MSU (x-ref Burns) Oct 9, 2006

Stan Jones: More nuclear plants and more liquefied coal

Q: What are the most realistic alternative energy plans for Montana and America?

JONES: The cheapest electrical power is nuclear energy. But this nation has pretty much put the kibosh on nuclear energy, but theyíre the cleanest, cheapest, & safest form of energy. New designs can burn used fuel, that we are storing in underground vaults, and use it up completely. We must re-institute nuclear power. Coal is another one. Montana is rich in coal, which can be liquefied into gasoline. If government got out of the way, we would already be using it. Government over-regulates the energy industry.

BURNS: Last year we opened up some new areas for energy production. And we found more oil and we found more gas. Thatís what brings down the price of gasoline, when policies inject competition into the market.

TESTER: If I were not running for US Senate, on my farm, we would be crushing safflower, because Iíve run the numbers, and it works, and it provides a renewable energy source that makes sense.

Source: 2006 Montana 3-way Senate Debate at MSU Oct 9, 2006

Stan Jones: Global warming is a natural occurrence since 1000AD

Q: Your views on global climate change?

BURNS: Weíve been warming since the Ice Age, and that continues. Thatís a pretty well-known fact.

TESTER: The truth is, the polar ice cap is half as thick as it was in 1950. Yes, Earth is warming since the Ice Age, thatís correct, but itís warming much more rapidly now than it ever has in our history.

JONES: There is global warming; itís very slight; itís a recovery from whatís called the Little Ice Age, when the average temperatures were much lower. In the years 500AD to 1000AD, temperatures were much higher than they are right now. Global warming is a natural recovery, and is not harmful. Most of it is only happening in the northern hemisphere. Scientists have proven that carbon dioxide emissions contribute only about 5% of the total greenhouse gases. If we reduce that worldwide, do you think it will have a big impact no greenhouse gases? No it will not. This is a natural occurrence and we should not make any effort to change it.

Source: 2006 Montana 3-way Senate Debate at MSU (x-ref Burns) Oct 9, 2006

Bob Kelleher: Use coal, oil & gas in an environmental manner

Source: Montana 2004 Gubernatorial National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2004

Brian Schweitzer: Develop renewable energy: ethanol, wind and hydrogen

Q: What principles do you support regarding the environment and energy?

A: I support responsible development of Montanaís natural resources while protecting our clean air, water and wildlands. I have also proposed developing new, renewable energy sources, such as clean-burning ethanol fuel, wind and hydrogen, to create jobs and reduce dependence on foreign oil.

Source: 2004 Montana Gubernatorial National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2004

Judy Martz: Protected transition to competitive energy prices in 2002

The 1997 Legislature demonstrated leadership by protecting Montana consumers from energy price changes until July 1, 2002. Other states in our region that did not do so are experiencing what our legislature protected us from. Still, Montana law should be changed to extend the transition period for customer choice for the time necessary to obtain the best power price for customers and give investors the time to bring new facilities on line.

In the near-term, the industrial customers and the generators of electricity should enter into contracts for power supply, perhaps with incentives from the State. The price of electricity will increase after July 1, 2002, but it must be reasonable. Suppliers should recover their costs, plus a reasonable profit. The California prices of today are not being set by a competitive marketplace and are unrealistic because they are not a result of long-term supply contracts. Competition will work, but we cannot be halfway in and halfway out.

Source: 2001 State of the State Address to Montana Legislature Jan 25, 2001

Judy Martz: More energy plants; diversify sources; include renewables

We must increase the supply of power through more generating facilities. We should diversify, wherever possible, our sources of fuel. For example: natural gas, coal, and renewable resources such as wind and solar energy. We should streamline the permitting process, allowing construction of new facilities to be built within a more reasonable time frame, but also within the parameters of our stringent environmental standards.
Source: 2001 State of the State Address to Montana Legislature Jan 25, 2001

John Bohlinger: Require clean-burning fuels; repeal electricity deregulation

Source: Montana Legislative 1998 National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 1998

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