State of Massachusetts Archives: on Budget & Economy


Ed Markey: Home mortgage deduction should not be on the table

Markey seized on Gomez's apparent willingness to leave open the possibility of eliminating the federal home mortgage deduction to help close the deficit.

Gomez said while he hoped the deduction would stay, "going into anything with preconditions almost guarantees failure."

"I do have a precondition," Markey responded. "And it is that home mortgage deduction should not be on the table. People should be able to afford the home of their dreams."

Source: Boston Herald on 2013 MA Senate debates Jun 11, 2013

Gabriel Gomez: Deficit reduction might even include home mortgage deduction

Markey said tonight in a debate in the special election race for US Senate that he would oppose eliminating the home mortgage interest deduction as a way to address the nation's deficit problems. But his opponent, Republican businessman Gabriel Gomez, said he would go into deficit reduction talks with an "open mind, willing to discuss everything."

"I'm not going in there with any preconditions. I would throw everything in the bucket and discuss it," Gomez said, though he noted that eliminating the deduction would be "at the bottom of the list."

Markey said, "I do have a precondition and my precondition is that the home mortgage interest deduction is not on the table, that people should be able to rely on that promise, that they will be able to afford the home of their dreams."

Source: Boston Globe on 2013 MA Senate debates Jun 11, 2013

Ed Markey: Sequestration is another word for mindless cuts

Lynch and Markey debated recent across-the-board federal spending cuts known as sequestration, and both candidates acknowledged the problems the cuts would shoulder on the Commonwealth.

"Sequestration is another word for cuts--mindless cuts," Markey said. "This sequester is cutting into the business plan of Massachusetts." Markey said he has been organizing efforts in the House to restore funding for the National Institutes of Health, so that grants to many schools and biotech firms in Massachusetts would be reinstated.

Lynch said he voted for sequestration because defaulting on debt was a negative direction for the U.S. "It would have devastated this country," he said. "We have to try to get people to come together and look at our budget anew and look at total reform of our budget. We have to reorder our priorities within the budget."

Source: 2013 MA Senate debate in B.U. Daily Free Press Apr 9, 2013

Steve Lynch: Voted for sequestration because debt default was worse

Lynch and Markey debated recent across-the-board federal spending cuts known as sequestration, and both candidates acknowledged the problems the cuts would shoulder on the Commonwealth.

"Sequestration is another word for cuts--mindless cuts," Markey said. "This sequester is cutting into the business plan of Massachusetts." Markey said he has been organizing efforts in the House to restore funding for the National Institutes of Health, so that grants to many schools and biotech firms in Massachusetts would be reinstated.

Lynch said he voted for sequestration because defaulting on debt was a negative direction for the U.S. "It would have devastated this country," he said. "We have to try to get people to come together and look at our budget anew and look at total reform of our budget. We have to reorder our priorities within the budget."

Source: 2013 MA Senate debate in B.U. Daily Free Press Apr 9, 2013

Steve Lynch: Supported sequestration and opposed financial bailouts

Lynch slammed Markey's support for the financial bailout. In the candidate question period, when Markey asked Lynch to defend his vote for sequestration, while Lynch asked Markey to defend his vote on the financial bailout.

Markey framed sequestration, which Lynch supported, as causing potentially devastating cuts that could cost Massachusetts jobs. And Lynch charged that Markey, with his vote for the Wall Street bailout, essentially put money in the pockets of big banks to the detriment of average Americans. Both candidates agreed that the recession is still hitting minorities; that Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke deserves another term; and that Iran should not have nuclear weapons.

Source: The Hill coverage of 2013 MA Senate debates Mar 27, 2013

Brian Herr: Control spending; oppose earmarks; reduce national debt

Herr says that government should and can be run like a business, with metrics used to measure return on investment. "You're never going to convince me that spending beyond your means is a good way to run an organization," Herr said.

To reduce the national debt, Herr said he wants to control spending and is willing to make difficult, unpopular decisions, such as opposing earmarks and "pet projects."

"We can't tax our way out of this," he said. While he thinks stimulus spending has only saved jobs and not created new employment or growth, Herr said he would like to see government invest in the digital backbone of the third district to encourage companies to expand. He also backs continued support for those still unemployed. "I'm not opposed to government," he said. "I studied it, and I like it."

Source: MetroWest Daily News on 2014 MA Senate race Aug 16, 2010

Brian Herr: Limited Hopkinton annual property tax increase to under 2.5%

As chairman of the Hopkinton Board of Selectmen, Herr said, he ran the town like a private business, cutting spending in several areas and consolidating departments. The cuts allowed Hopkinton to limit its annual property tax increase, instead of raising taxes the allowed 2.5%.

Herr believes politics in Hopkinton is a microcosm of politics at the state and national levels and believes his experience there [demonstrates how to put] problem-solving before party politics and promote pragmatic budgeting.

Source: Worcester Telegram & Gazette on 2014 MA Senate race Aug 16, 2010

Scott Brown: AdWatch: $2 trillion spending spree puts us deeper in debt

American Future Fund, a conservative 501(c)(4): Ad Narrator:

Scott Brown supports an across-the-board tax cut. Martha Coakley says, quote, "We need to get taxes up." Brown has pledged not to raise taxes. Coakley says she will. Brown opposed the $2 trillion spending spree that's putting us deeper in debt. Coakley supports massive new spending and the tax increases to pay for it. Call Martha Coakley and tell her we can't afford more taxes.

Source: FactCheck "Bay State Battle" AdWatch: 2010 MA Senate debate Jan 13, 2010

Scott Brown: No new regulation of the financial markets

Coakley's campaign, in an ad released this week, describes Brown as someone who would march in step with "Washington Republicans," portraying him as anti-government and pro-business. The ad says Brown will "block tougher oversight of Wall Street."

Brown has said that he's not in favor of new regulation of the financial markets, preferring to let "private enterprise try to get us out of this mess."

Source: FactCheck "Bay State Battle" AdWatch: 2010 MA Senate debate Jan 13, 2010

Scott Brown: People are angry over tax and spend mentality and $12T debt

Q: You're probably gonna win the primary. But you probably will not win the general election in a Democratic state. So why go through this?

A: I respectfully have to disagree with you this is not a Democrat state; it's not a Kennedy state; it's the people, and right now they're angry. They tried the tax and spend mentality and don't forget we already have twelve people down there right now [in Massachusetts' delegation to the U.S. Congress] that are voting the same way on the same special interest there. Taxing and spending us to a twelve trillion dollar national debt. People are telling me around the state that they want somebody different has been an independent thinker and talker. I have been representing now the state house's fiscal conservative watchdog so I have to respectfully disagree. You should come and see the enthusiasm and excitement to put somebody down there [in D.C.] who is not like the others.

Source: NECN Good Morning Live interviews on 2009 MA Senate race Nov 30, 2009

Martha Coakley: Economic system spiraling out of control; go after Wall St.

Coakley said that the nation has "great insecurity" about the future. She noted that Pres. Obama invited her to Washington last week because she is one of four prosecutors nationwide who had tackled financial institutions that contributed to the economic crisis. "We are frankly in a mess," she said. "We have an economic system that is spiraling out of control. I think we want someone who is going to go after the Wall Street that created the economic situation, as well as lack of regulation in Washington.
Source: Boston Globe coverage of 2009 MA Senate race Oct 13, 2009

Stephen Pagliuca: Managing director at Bain Capital; trained as accountant

Pagliuca, the managing director at Bain Capital, told his personal story as the grandson of an Italian immigrant who urged him to get an education and succeed. He said his grandfather had wanted him to be an accountant because they were the only people with good jobs during the Depression. Now that the United States is in the worst economy since those times, he said he would fight in Washington to make sure today's children would have the same opportunities that he did.
Source: Boston Globe coverage of 2009 MA Senate race Oct 13, 2009

Scott Brown: Let private enterprise try to get us out of this mess

Q: Today is the one-year anniversary of the start of the financial crisis in the U.S. It was one year ago today that Lehman Bros., the investment bank, went belly up, and within days the U.S. economy was pretty much in a full-scale panic. Where are you on that?

A: It's all about the economy and jobs. Pulling back on the financial [regulations], I think if you do too much too soon, it doesn't have a chance to catch up and see if we can work out of this ourselves through free enterprise, through private enterprise, intervention and creativity. So I'm all in favor of just holding back for a little bit and letting private enterprise try to get us out of this mess.

Q: Is another government stimulus plan a good idea?

A: I don't think so. We are leaving a legacy, amassing amazing amounts of debt, passing it on to our kids and grand-kids, and at some point we are just going to be top heavy.

Source: WBUR interview on 2009 MA Senate primary debate Sep 14, 2009

Scott Brown: No cap on bankers' salaries

Q: Congressman Barney Frank has been a leader in a movement on Capitol Hill to make financial industry executives more accountable, hold their salaries in check in the process. Do you think that's a good idea?

A: I don't agree with Barney's proposal on that. We should let the free-enterprise and the business market do what it needs to do to get our economy back and running. I'm concerned that government intervention into private businesses is just crossing the line.

Source: WBUR interview on 2009 MA Senate primary debate Sep 14, 2009

Deval Patrick: Focus on stimulating economic growth via local aid

I think all of us agree on one thing, which is about the importance of stimulating economic growth here in Massachusetts and how important that is. I will say when I talk about the reasons for restoring local aid it is about investing in the infrastructure so we can create a platform and small and medium-sized businesses to grow. Itís about creating opportunities to provide capital for those small and medium sized businesses, which is where most job growth is going to come from.
Source: 2006 MA Gubernatorial debate on Fox News with Chris Wallace Sep 25, 2006

Grace Ross: Shift $3B in more taxes on very rich by flattening tax rates

Q: Your platform calls for ending poverty, for universal healthcare, for providing affordable housing, all very admirable goals. How are you going to pay for them?

ROSS: Well, itís very straightforward. If you add together all the many taxes that everyoneís been talking about and you look at who pays those taxes it turns out that the folks at the bottom pay about twice out of every dollar what the folks at the top do. So if we had a system that was even flat, not just for income tax but for all taxes, we would have about $3 billion more, mostly coming from the folks at the very top. So thatís $3 billion more in a $22 billion budget. Then if we look at an issue like we spend about a billion dollars a year on sweetheart siting deals for big corporations--we have a very uneven system. Thatís a billion more dollars in our budget, combine reporting for corporations, which requires them to actually pay for the business they do in Massachusetts, we get almost $5 billion back with all of those.

Source: 2006 MA Gubernatorial debate on Fox News with Chris Wallace Sep 25, 2006

Kerry Healey: Focus on local aid and mobilizing people to call for it

HEALEY: We need to increase local aid. My administration proposed a 17% increase in local aid this year along with a 8% increase in education aid, plus the beginning of a tax rollback. All in the same budget. What did the legislature do? They only gave cities and towns 8% more this year. I have the fiscal discipline to focus on the things that really matter so that we can increase local aid but also get the tax rollback in there.

MIHOS: But you canít get it done. Youíve been trying. You wonít work with them, you vilify them each and every day.

HEALEY: The people who are watching here tonight can mobilize and get that done. When people are educated they will pick up their phone and call up their legislator and demand what is theirs and they deserve the rollback.

ROSS: Your office had the capacity to veto any piece of the budget that you wanted to veto and I donít see the billion dollars that youíre talking about.

HEALEY: They had the capacity to override it. Itís 77% Democrats.

Source: 2006 MA Gubernatorial debate on Fox News with Chris Wallace Sep 25, 2006

  • The above quotations are from Commonwealth of Massachusetts Politicians: Archives.
  • Click here for definitions & background information on Budget & Economy.
  • Click here for other issues (main summary page).
2016 Presidential contenders on Budget & Economy:
  Democrats:
Secy.Hillary Clinton(NY)
V.P.Joe Biden(DE)
Gov.Andrew Cuomo(NY)
Mayor Rahm Emanuel(IL)
Gov.Martin O`Malley(MD)

Republicans:
Amb.John Bolton(MD)
Gov.Jeb Bush(FL)
Dr.Ben Carson(MD)
Gov.Chris Christie(NJ)
Sen.Ted Cruz(TX)
Gov.Mike Huckabee(AR)
Gov.Jon Huntsman(UT)
Gov.Bobby Jindal(LA)
Rep.Peter King(NY)
Gov.Sarah Palin(AK)
Sen.Rand Paul(KY)
Gov.Rick Perry(TX)
Sen.Rob Portman(OH)
Secy.Condi Rice(CA)
Sen.Marco Rubio(FL)
Rep.Paul Ryan(WI)
Sen.Rick Santorum(PA)
2016 Third Party Candidates:
Mayor Michael Bloomberg(I-NYC)
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Donald Trump(NY)
Gov.Jesse Ventura(I-MN)
Please consider a donation to OnTheIssues.org!
Click for details -- or send donations to:
1770 Mass Ave. #630, Cambridge MA 02140
E-mail: submit@OnTheIssues.org
(We rely on your support!)

Page last updated: Apr 20, 2014