State of Kentucky Archives: on Tax Reform


Alison Grimes: Close tax loopholes for wealthy to pay for college loans

Grimes received a boost from a leading Democrat who is also taking on Republican Mitch McConnell across the country. Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts visited the University of Louisville to stump for Grimes and reform efforts of the country's student loan system.

McConnell slammed the proposal as a tax increase because it was paid for by closing tax loopholes for Americans earning over $1 million annually. Warren has made a personal mission of targeting McConnell, Grimes' opponent, since he successfully blocked her bill aimed at cutting student loan rates earlier this month. "McConnell said when you got a choice between billionaires and students, it's more important to protect the billionaires," said Warren. "We fell two votes short. If you send us Alison Grimes instead of Mitch McConnell, you change the world."

The chair of the UofL college Republicans said, "Alison Grimes is using Warren's failed student loan bill, which relies on raising taxes on Kentucky's job creators by 30%."

Source: WFPL coverage of 2014 Kentucky Senate race Jun 29, 2014

Mitch McConnell: Comprehensive tax reform can work if it's revenue-neutral

Q: Are you for tax reform? Or might you even support some who are calling to get rid of the IRS?

McCONNELL: What I would like to see is the same kind of premise that Ronald Reagan and Tip O'Neill, a Republican and a Democrat, had back in the '80s. And the premise was this: We're going to do tax reform but it will be revenue neutral to the government. In other words, the government doesn't gain revenue for itself. It's for flattening out the tax rate, making our country more competitive. If we can agree, in advance, that the exercise will be conducted within those parameters, that it's not a tax increase for the federal government, then I think it would be a very good thing for our country to do comprehensive tax reform, lower the rates, and make America more competitive in the global economy.

Source: Meet the Press 2013 on 2014 Kentucky Senate race Jul 14, 2013

Steve Beshear: Taxes are not the answer; no broad-based increases

I have opposed broad-based tax increases in Kentucky, and I will continue to oppose them during this legislative session. I will not threaten the survival and growth of our businesses at this perilous moment. I will not burden our families as they struggle to survive. And I will not jeopardize our fragile recovery. Last October, the national Tax Foundation ranked Kentucky's Business Tax Climate 19th best in the nation, up an incredible 15 spots in one year. We're ahead of neighbors Illinois, Ohio, West Virginia and Tennessee, which was ranked 27th. Taxes are not the answer. And neither is decimating our priorities--education, creating jobs and public safety. Instead, we have acted in a calm, strategic and measured way to rein in government with an eye not just on short-term survival but also on long-term progress. And that strategy is working. The light at the end of the tunnel is real, and we are moving closer to it.
Source: 2011 Kentucky State of the State Address Feb 1, 2011

Jack Conway: Keep Bush tax cuts during recession

Q: [To Conway] I want to ask about a change in your position on the Bush tax cuts. You told the Louisville Courier-Journal in April, "I would favor letting expire the majority of the Bush tax cuts." Now you want to extend all of them.

CONWAY: I was talking about the special interest provisions that allow companies to shift our jobs overseas. That's what I was focused on in that particular interview. We shouldn't be raising taxes in a time of recession, with 10% unemployment, with capital frozen on the sidelines. In 2002, when I was running for the US Congress, I was for the Bush tax cuts then. I was one of the few Democrats for them. And I think now we just ought to extend them.

PAUL: Well, you were for them before you were against them. At the Farm Bureau debate just a couple of months ago, you said you were bringing back the death tax.

CONWAY: No, I didn't.

PAUL: You specifically said you wouldn't take a 55% tax on estates. You said 45% with some exemptions.

CONWAY: I never said that.

Source: Fox News Sunday, 2010 Kentucky Senate debate Oct 3, 2010

Rand Paul: Balanced budget amendment to pay to extend $4T Bush tax cuts

Q: You have been consistent that you wanted to extend all the Bush tax cuts. But that would add $4 trillion to the deficit. The first issue you mentioned in this debate was the national debt. How are you going to pay for a $4 trillion loss of revenue fro the tax cuts?

PAUL: First of all, you look at whose money is it. It's the people's money who earned the money. And we give up some to pay taxes. So I'm not seeing it as a cost to government. But I will immediately introduce bills to reduce spending so I think we should offset it.

Q: There's no way you're going to get $4 trillion by spending cuts.

PAUL: I will introduce legislation that will balance the budget. We will have a balanced budget amendment introduced if I'm elected. But about the Bush tax cuts--businesses have made calculations on these for 5 or 10 years. Business needs predictability. If you take away these Bush tax cuts, if you allow Obama to have the largest tax increase in our history, it will be a disaster for the economy.

Source: Fox News Sunday, 2010 Kentucky Senate debate Oct 3, 2010

Bruce Lunsford: Eliminate the capital gains tax

For the first time during a campaign fought mostly over airwaves, Republican U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell and his Democratic challenger Bruce Lunsford stared each other down Wednesday and answered each others’ criticisms.

During the forum, the candidates agreed on several broad policy issues, such as eliminating the capital gains tax. But they frequently traded shots over each other’s political backers.

Source: 2008 Kentucky Senate debate reported in Herald-Leader Aug 21, 2008

Mitch McConnell: Resolve to lower capital gains taxes

McConnell said that Lunsford’s farm upbringing “isn’t relevant” to how he would perform in the Senate and questioned Lunsford’s resolve to lower capital gains taxes, which are not indexed for inflation. He said Democratic leaders in the Senate would never allow a budget bill with such a tax cut, and “the chances of a freshman legislator voting against a budget resolution is nil.”
Source: 2008 Kentucky Senate debate reported in Courier-Journal Aug 21, 2008

  • The above quotations are from Commonwealth of Kentucky Politicians: Archives.
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2016 Presidential contenders on Tax Reform:
  Republicans:
Amb.John Bolton(MD)
Gov.Jeb Bush(FL)
Dr.Ben Carson(MD)
Gov.Chris Christie(NJ)
Sen.Ted Cruz(TX)
Gov.Mike Huckabee(AR)
Gov.Jon Huntsman(UT)
Gov.Bobby Jindal(LA)
Rep.Peter King(NY)
Gov.Sarah Palin(AK)
Sen.Rand Paul(KY)
Gov.Rick Perry(TX)
Sen.Rob Portman(OH)
Secy.Condi Rice(CA)
Sen.Marco Rubio(FL)
Rep.Paul Ryan(WI)
Sen.Rick Santorum(PA)
Democrats:
Secy.Hillary Clinton(NY)
V.P.Joe Biden(DE)
Gov.Andrew Cuomo(NY)
Mayor Rahm Emanuel(IL)
Gov.Martin O`Malley(MD)
Sen.Bernie Sanders(VT)
Gov.Brian Schweitzer(MT)
Sen.Jim Webb(VA)

2016 Third Party Candidates:
Mayor Michael Bloomberg(I-NYC)
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Donald Trump(NY)
Gov.Jesse Ventura(I-MN)
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Page last updated: Sep 08, 2014