State of Kentucky Archives: on Crime


Matt Bevin: Imperative to address backlog of forensic tests

For too long, the Kentucky state lab has carried a backlog for DNA and other forensic testing due to a shortage of resources. This backlog includes blood alcohol, toxicology, drugs, gunshot residue, arson, fingerprint, DNA, polygraph and other tests whose results can be critical to ensuring justice for survivors of crimes, including rape and sexual assault victims. We must stop talking about this problem and start solving it. Funds will be made immediately available to begin addressing the backlogs of untested rape kits and other types of forensic testing.
Source: 2016 State of the State speech to Kentucky legislature Jan 26, 2016

Matt Bevin: Restore felon voting rights, but only through legislature

Bevin suspended Beshear's Nov. 24 executive order that automatically restored the right to vote to most nonviolent felons who have served out their sentences. "While I have been a vocal supporter of the restoration of rights," Bevin said, "it is an issue that must be addressed through the legislature and by the will of the people."

Bevin's order will not retroactively affect felons who, since Nov. 24, have received a certificate from the state Department of Corrections confirming their restoration of rights. Bevin said felons may continue requesting a restoration of their civil rights from the governor's office, which includes the right to vote, to serve on a jury, to hold elected office and to obtain a professional or vocational license. That was how Beshear handled it "for essentially the entire eight years of his administration," until he changed the process "less than two weeks prior to the expiration of his term," Bevin said.

Source: Lexington Herald Leader on 2015 Kentucky gubernatorial race Dec 22, 2015

Steve Beshear: Restore right to vote to most nonviolent felons

Republican Gov. Matt Bevin filed five executive orders to start reshaping state government along conservative ideological lines, including one that reversed earlier executive orders by former Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear to restore voting rights to felons.

Bevin suspended Beshear's Nov. 24 executive order that automatically restored the right to vote to most nonviolent felons who have served out their sentences--a pool that potentially included many tens of thousands of Kentuckians.

"While I have been a vocal supporter of the restoration of rights," Bevin said in a prepared statement, "it is an issue that must be addressed through the legislature and by the will of the people." Restoration of civil rights includes the right to vote, to serve on a jury, to hold elected office and to obtain a professional or vocational license.

Source: Lexington Herald Leader on 2015 Kentucky gubernatorial race Dec 22, 2015

Jack Conway: Reduce crime via focus on cybercrime against kids

Conway focused on his office's work to reduce crime in Kentucky, mostly through the Cyber Crimes unit aimed at abolishing Internet crimes against children, and his war against prescription drug abuse. "This is the first time that the number of deaths from overdoses is headed downwards," he said, adding that he has spoken to more than 40,000 students about the importance of staying drug free.
Source: Sentinel-News on 2015 Kentucky gubernatorial race Apr 16, 2014

Alison Grimes: One in six US women will be victims of domestic violence

PROTECTING VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: As Secretary of State, Alison championed the first-ever address confidentiality program for victims of domestic violence to ensure their safety and security are not compromised when they vote. In the Senate, Alison will continue to be a voice for victims of domestic violence. According to the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services, "a woman is assaulted every 15 seconds" and one in six women in the U.S. will be victims of domestic violence over the course of her lifetime--troubling statistics that must be addressed.

Despite political attempts to disguise his real record, Mitch McConnell has repeatedly opposed the Violence Against Women Act and even blocked an effort to vote on the bill to protect women.

Source: 2014 Senate campaign website AlisonForKentucky.com "Issues" Feb 3, 2014

Harry Blackmun: Black defendants have Constitutional right to blacks on jury

James Batson was an African American man convicted of burglary in a Kentucky circuit court by a jury composed entirely of white jurors. During jury selection, the prosecutor peremptorily challenged all four black persons, and a jury composed only of white persons was selected. The defense counsel moved to discharge the whole jury on the ground that the prosecutor's removal of the black jurors violated the Constitutional right to a jury drawn from a cross section of the community.

The Supreme Court ruled in a 7-2 decision in Batson's favor. The court ruled that the defendant first must show that he is a member of a recognizable racial group, and that the prosecutor has removed from the jury pool members of the defendant's race, [and that Batson met those criteria]. (Majority opinion written by Powell, joined by Brennan, White, Marshall, Blackmun, Stevens, O'Connor.)

The dissenting opinion concluded that the majority misapplied equal protection doctrine. (Dissent by Rehnquist, joined by Burger)

Source: Wikipedia on 1986 SCOTUS 7-2 ruling in Batson v. Kentucky Apr 30, 1986

John Paul Stevens: Black defendants have Constitutional right to blacks on jury

James Batson was an African American man convicted of burglary in a Kentucky circuit court by a jury composed entirely of white jurors. During jury selection, the prosecutor peremptorily challenged all four black persons, and a jury composed only of white persons was selected. The defense counsel moved to discharge the whole jury on the ground that the prosecutor's removal of the black jurors violated the Constitutional right to a jury drawn from a cross section of the community.

The Supreme Court ruled in a 7-2 decision in Batson's favor. The court ruled that the defendant first must show that he is a member of a recognizable racial group, and that the prosecutor has removed from the jury pool members of the defendant's race, [and that Batson met those criteria]. (Majority opinion written by Powell, joined by Brennan, White, Marshall, Blackmun, Stevens, O'Connor.)

The dissenting opinion concluded that the majority misapplied equal protection doctrine. (Dissent by Rehnquist, joined by Burger)

Source: Wikipedia on 1986 SCOTUS 7-2 ruling in Batson v. Kentucky Apr 30, 1986

Sandra Day O`Connor: Black defendants have Constitutional right to blacks on jury

James Batson was an African American man convicted of burglary in a Kentucky circuit court by a jury composed entirely of white jurors. During jury selection, the prosecutor peremptorily challenged all four black persons, and a jury composed only of white persons was selected. The defense counsel moved to discharge the whole jury on the ground that the prosecutor's removal of the black jurors violated the Constitutional right to a jury drawn from a cross section of the community.

The Supreme Court ruled in a 7-2 decision in Batson's favor. The court ruled that the defendant first must show that he is a member of a recognizable racial group, and that the prosecutor has removed from the jury pool members of the defendant's race, [and that Batson met those criteria]. (Majority opinion written by Powell, joined by Brennan, White, Marshall, Blackmun, Stevens, O'Connor.)

The dissenting opinion concluded that the majority misapplied equal protection doctrine. (Dissent by Rehnquist, joined by Burger)

Source: Wikipedia on 1986 SCOTUS 7-2 ruling in Batson v. Kentucky Apr 30, 1986

William Rehnquist: Black defendants have no right to blacks on jury

James Batson was an African American man convicted of burglary in a Kentucky circuit court by a jury composed entirely of white jurors. During jury selection, the prosecutor peremptorily challenged all four black persons, and a jury composed only of white persons was selected. The defense counsel moved to discharge the whole jury on the ground that the prosecutor's removal of the black jurors violated the Constitutional right to a jury drawn from a cross section of the community.

The Supreme Court ruled in a 7-2 decision in Batson's favor. The court ruled that the defendant first must show that he is a member of a recognizable racial group, and that the prosecutor has removed from the jury pool members of the defendant's race, [and that Batson met those criteria]. (Majority opinion written by Powell, joined by Brennan, White, Marshall, Blackmun, Stevens, O'Connor.)

The dissenting opinion concluded that the majority misapplied equal protection doctrine. (Dissent by Rehnquist, joined by Burger)

Source: Wikipedia on 1986 SCOTUS 7-2 ruling in Batson v. Kentucky Apr 30, 1986

  • The above quotations are from Commonwealth of Kentucky Politicians: Archives.
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