State of Kentucky Archives: on Civil Rights


Jack Conway: Same-sex marriage ban is last vestige of discrimination

Kentucky's Attorney General Explains Why He Won't Defend Gay Marriage Ban: Calling laws against same-sex marriage the last vestige of widespread discrimination in America, Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway told TIME magazine he refused to continue defending his state's ban on gay marriage because he feared he'd regret it for the rest of his life. "I know where history is going on this," he said. "I know what was in my heart."
Source: 2015 Kentucky Governor campaign website, ConwayOverly.com Aug 11, 2015

Jack Conway: Didn't challenge court ruling that allowed same-sex marriage

Matt Bevin is the conservative running in a conservative state against a candidate who wouldn't challenge a court ruling striking down Kentucky's ban on same-sex marriage. Republicans will try to tie Conway to Democratic President Barack Obama.

But can Conway convince Kentuckians he's one of them? Fairly or not, Conway is viewed by some rural Kentuckians as a wealthy, urban elitist. He sent his running mate on a rural tour rather than go himself. He reminds audiences that his father grew up in Union County, but the farm boys I know are likely to take more notice of his expensive suits and cuff links.

Source: CNHI News coverage of 2015 Kentucky Gubernatorial race May 29, 2015

Alison Grimes: Supports allowing gay marriage

Grimes also repeated her support for allowing gay marriage, acknowledging that not all of Kentucky agrees with her "philosophy" but saying "my hope is that we can move forward."
Source: Lexington Herald Leader on 2014 Kentucky Senate race Sep 25, 2014

Alison Grimes: AdWatch: VAWA and equal pay for women

Kentucky Democratic Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes is hitting Sen. Mitch McConnell on women's issues in her newest ad, the latest in a series featuring regular Kentucky citizens: Ilene Woods of Lynch KY asks McConnell why he voted twice against the Violence Against Women Act and "against enforcing equal pay for women." After a moment of silence, Grimes says, "I can never get him to answer this one either." She adds, to McConnell: "I approved this message, because senator, you must be forgetting that over half the voters in Kentucky are women like Ilene."

The charge that McConnell opposed the Violence Against Women Act and equal pay legislation is central to Grimes' pitch to female voters. McConnell's team has pushed back, arguing that he was originally a co-sponsor of the bill and only voted against it twice because he felt one changed version of the bill went too far, and because once it was attached to a ban on assault weapons.

Source: The Hill AdWatch on 2014 Kentucky Senate race Jul 30, 2014

Mitch McConnell: I co-sponsored VAWA but final version went too far

Kentucky Democratic Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes is hitting Sen. Mitch McConnell on women's issues in her newest ad, the latest in a series featuring regular Kentucky citizens: Ilene Woods of Lynch KY asks McConnell why he voted twice against the Violence Against Women Act and "against enforcing equal pay for women." After a moment of silence, Grimes says, "I can never get him to answer this one either." She adds, to McConnell: "I approved this message, because senator, you must be forgetting that over half the voters in Kentucky are women like Ilene."

The charge that McConnell opposed the Violence Against Women Act and equal pay legislation is central to Grimes' pitch to female voters. McConnell's team has pushed back, arguing that he was originally a co-sponsor of the bill and only voted against it twice because he felt one changed version of the bill went too far, and because once it was attached to a ban on assault weapons.

Source: The Hill weblog on 2014 Kentucky Senate race Jul 30, 2014

Alison Grimes: Both supportive and apprehensive about marriage equality

Grimes appears to be playing it safe on marriage equality in the wake of a federal judge's ruling that the state's ban on same-sex marriage is unconstitutional. When asked to comment about the judge's decision striking down the ban, Grimes seemed both supportive and apprehensive about marriage equality: "While I don't believe any church should be forced to recognize anything that is inconsistent with their teachings, my husband and I have been married for seven years, and I believe others should have the opportunity to make that same commitment," Grimes wrote by email.

Grimes' campaign issued a virtually identical statement in February when the same federal judge ruled that Kentucky must recognize same-sex marriages performed in other states. This isn't the first time Grimes has seemed reluctant to discuss the issue: In August, she declined to express her views on marriage equality in an interview with Politico. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), whom Grimes is attempting to unseat, opposed the ruling.

Source: Huffington Post on 2014 Kentucky Senate race Jul 1, 2014

Matt Bevin: Why not define marriage as a parent marrying their child?

Bevin suggested that legalizing same-sex marriages could lead to marriages between a parent and child: "If it's all right to have same-sex marriages, why not define a marriage--because at the end of the day a lot of this ends up being taxes and who can visit who in the hospital and there's other repressions and things that come with it--so a person may want to define themselves as being married to one of their children so that they can then in fact pass on certain things to that child financially and otherwise," Bevin said on a conservative talk-radio show. "Where do you draw the line?"

Bevin's campaign spokeswoman pushed back on reports on Bevin's comments: to suggest Bevin drew a connection between same-sex marriage and marriage between a child and a parent was a "gross misrepresentation of what Matt said. He sees no comparison between gay marriage and incest. He was discussing the implications of the legal rights such as hospital visitations. To imply otherwise is ridiculous," she said.

Source: The Hill blog on 2014 Kentucky Senate race Feb 20, 2014

Alison Grimes: Fight for pay equity for women

Just as she has throughout her life, Alison Lundergan Grimes will continue fighting for women as Kentucky's first female United States Senator.

ACHIEVING PAY EQUITY: Women are half of the labor force in this country yet still make 77 cents for every dollar--23% less than their male counterparts. In Kentucky, women lose nearly $5 billion in wages each year--a statistic that is staggering and unacceptable. With that money a working woman in Kentucky could purchase 78 more weeks of groceries, pay 14 more months of rent, make 8 more months of mortgage and utilities payments or buy 2,477 additional gallons of gas. In contrast, Mitch McConnell has called equal pay for equal work just another "special interest vote" and voted against the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act and the Paycheck Fairness Act--not once, but twice.

Source: 2014 Senate campaign website, AlisonForKentucky.com "Issues" Nov 8, 2013

Jack Conway: Claims Paul questions Civil Rights Act and the ADA

Q: [With regard to Conway's "Aqua Buddha" TV ads]: Why does an incident from 27 years ago matter to voters?

CONWAY: There's a direct line from his college days. "The Washington Post" last week did a series of stories about Rand Paul's college letters to the editor. And he questioned whether or not two people could ever be equal. You know, I happen to think our creator makes us equal. He questioned whether or not women needed equal protection in the law. He questioned nondiscrimination laws and consumer protection laws. And you can draw a straight line from those attitudes in college to the positions he has taken in this campaign. Rand Paul has said that the federal government doesn't need to be involved in faith-based initiatives. He's come for a 23% national sales tax that would do away with charitable deductions. He's questioned fundamental principles of the Civil Rights Act and the Americans With Disabilities Act, too.

Source: CNN "360 Degrees" coverage: 2010 Kentucky Senate debate Oct 19, 2010

Jack Conway: I abhor discrimination; end "don't ask, don't tell"

Q: [To Conway]: You have signed the policy platforms of MoveOn.org supporting repeal of "don't ask, don't tell," and the so-called public option. Would you be to the left of Pres. Obama?

CONWAY: Look, I'm a proud Democrat. I'm certainly not going to be to the left of Obama. I'm going to put Kentucky first. And the reason I said something on "don't ask, don't tell" is I abhor discrimination. It was painful for a lot of Kentuckians to see Rand Paul question fundamental provisions of the Civil Rights Act.

Source: Fox News Sunday, 2010 Kentucky Senate debate Oct 3, 2010

Steve Beshear: Will veto a bill that would ban gay marriage in KY

In mid-January, a state senate committee approved legislation that would amend Kentucky's constitution to prohibit gay marriage. In late January, Gov. Steve Beshear vowed to veto the bill. In late March, a bill to bar state agencies and schools from giving domestic partners health insurance was killed in Committee.
Source: 2010 Kentucky gubernatorial press release Jan 14, 2010

Rand Paul: Opposes same-sex marriage

Like Dr. Paul, Mr. Grayson, 37, said he opposed the federal bailout, abortion rights and same-sex marriage. Mr. Grayson has the support of the state's most powerful politician, the Senate minority leader, Mitch McConnell, who hosted a fund-raiser in Washington for him in September, helping him amass the $1.2 million he raised from May to October.
Source: New York Times politics report: Kentucky Nov 26, 2009

Trey Grayson: Opposes same-sex marriage

Like Dr. Paul, Mr. Grayson, 37, said he opposed the federal bailout, abortion rights and same-sex marriage. Mr. Grayson has the support of the state's most powerful politician, the Senate minority leader, Mitch McConnell, who hosted a fund-raiser in Washington for him in September, helping him amass the $1.2 million he raised from May to October.
Source: New York Times politics report: Kentucky Nov 26, 2009

  • The above quotations are from Commonwealth of Kentucky Politicians: Archives.
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Page last updated: Dec 11, 2015