State of Arizona Archives: on Immigration


Doug Ducey: Better border security without comprehensive reform

Arizona state treasurer and businessman Doug Ducey claimed victory on Tuesday in the race to be the Republican nominee to replace outgoing Governor Jan Brewer, who has clashed repeatedly with the White House over illegal immigration.

With the vote decided, Brewer joined Ducey on the victory platform, despite having backed [Ducey's opponent] Smith, praising his candidacy in an effort to unify the party for the race ahead.

Ducey campaigned on rejuvenating the state's economy, improving education and shaking free of federal constraints. While calling for better border security, he avoided demands for comprehensive immigration reform and providing a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants that might alienate some voters.

Source: Reuters coverage of 2014 Arizona gubernatorial race Aug 27, 2014

Frank Riggs: Invest in fencing and additional border resources

Fred DuVal: The presumptive Democratic nominee sees border security as a national issue, promising to take up the issue with the federal government and continue to push the Comprehensive Immigration Reform bill.

Frank Riggs, Republican: The veteran and former police officer says he will also invest in fencing and providing additional resources to border sheriffs.

the heads of smugglers, providing amnesty to informants, and legalizing marijuana to reduce cartel profits.

Source: Arizona Republican on 2014 Arizona gubernatorial race Jul 7, 2014

Fred DuVal: Push for Comprehensive Immigration Reform

Fred DuVal: The presumptive Democratic nominee sees border security as a national issue, promising to take up the issue with the federal government and continue to push the Comprehensive Immigration Reform bill.

Frank Riggs, Republican: The veteran and former police officer says he will also invest in fencing and providing additional resources to border sheriffs.

the heads of smugglers, providing amnesty to informants, and legalizing marijuana to reduce cartel profits.

Source: Arizona Republican on 2014 Arizona gubernatorial race Jul 7, 2014

JL Mealer: Charge illegal immigrants with state crimes

Fred DuVal: The presumptive Democratic nominee sees border security as a national issue, promising to take up the issue with the federal government and continue to push the Comprehensive Immigration Reform bill.

Frank Riggs, Republican: The veteran and former police officer says he will also invest in fencing and providing additional resources to border sheriffs.

the heads of smugglers, providing amnesty to informants, and legalizing marijuana to reduce cartel profits.

Source: Arizona Republican on 2014 Arizona gubernatorial race Jul 7, 2014

Fred DuVal: Comprehensive immigration reform will benefit economy

Our State and nation have a long history of benefitting economically and culturally from the contributions of people from diverse nations. When comprehensive immigration reform is passed in Washington, our economy will be better off for it. Until then, we should take action to ensure that immigrant Arizonans who have been granted a legal right to work here are able to reach their full potential in our workforce by having access to in-state tuition and driver's licenses.
Source: 2014 Arizona gubernatorial campaign website, Fred2014.com Jul 2, 2014

Jeff Flake: Revamp guest-worker programs; it fails our needs

The focus of the debate was on rural issues, including migrant workers. The moderators asked Flake and Carmona where they stood on guest-worker programs. "We do need to revamp it," Flake said. "We simply don't have a program that's robust enough to take care of the needs that we have."

Carmona said comprehensive immigration reform should include visas, day-worker programs "that don't impede commerce but actually enhance commerce." They both agreed that border security needs to be stepped up..

Source: KYMA-TV-11 on 2012 Arizona "Rural Issues" Senate debate Oct 26, 2012

Richard Carmona: Comprehensive immigration reform ties into the economy

Both contenders said the economy and border security are major issues for the Desert Southwest. Carmona said, "Comprehensive immigration reform ties into the economy, it ties into jobs, it ties into a workforce that can go back and forth, so I will spend time on that."

Carmona said immigration reform will help boost commerce. "It's an important thing, because without comprehensive immigration reform, comprehensive tax reform, our small businesses are going to continue to suffer," Carmona said.

Source: KYMA-TV-11 on 2012 Arizona "Rural Issues" Senate debate Oct 26, 2012

Richard Carmona: More visas for day-workers to enhance commerce

The focus of the debate was on rural issues, including migrant workers. The moderators asked Flake and Carmona where they stood on guest-worker programs. "We do need to revamp it," Flake said. "We simply don't have a program that's robust enough to take care of the needs that we have."

Carmona said comprehensive immigration reform should include visas, day-worker programs "that don't impede commerce but actually enhance commerce." They both agreed that border security needs to be stepped up..

Source: KYMA-TV-11 on 2012 Arizona "Rural Issues" Senate debate Oct 26, 2012

Jeff Flake: Replicate operational security from Yuma Sector

Q: What about immigration reform?

A: On the border, we have now--and have had for a couple of years--operational security in the Yuma Sector. If we can just get the Tucson Sector to look like the Yuma Sector, then we have some political space where people will say, alright, let's solve the other attendant issue--employer-enforcement issues, some mechanism to deal with those who are here illegally now, some robust temporary-worker plan that can account for the labor needs we have, particularly in the ag sector, and then some way to deal with those issues like kids who were brought here when they were 2 years old and can't finish school. Those are all issues we're going to have to deal with. But I can tell you, it's a dead end until we can get better border security. Until then, we're just not going to get there.

Q: What does "there" look like?

A: It looks like the Yuma Sector. If somebody crosses illegally, we have a reasonable expectation of catching them.

Source: The Sahuarita Sun on 2012 Arizona Senate debates May 29, 2012

Richard Carmona: Dynamic interdiction plus prevention

Q: Immigration reform, what's it look like?

A: There are too many important issues that we have to deal with as a state and as a nation to be bickering about who's to blame for this. There are simple ways to solve this problem if we will allow the politics to be left at the door.

Q: You said it starts with a secure border. Explain that.

A: A secure border is really a dynamic concept. If you looked at the concept of a secure border 20 years ago, it was boots on the ground. As we've evolved we have sensors, we have electronic surveillances, we have drones, we have human intelligence working both sides of the border. So it's a lot more complex and layered system that protects our nation. So, do I know what will be best in five or 10 years? No, but I know that as long as there is demand to come here or to bring drugs in, people will always try to counteract our defense mechanism. The other side is, of course, prevention. It just can't be interdiction, it has to be prevention as well.

Source: The Sahuarita Sun on 2012 Arizona Senate debates May 29, 2012

Jeff Flake: Secure the border; then comprehensive reform

Q: You've been a proponent of comprehensive immigration reform in the past, but you've since come out in favor of securing the border before undertaking other reforms. Why?

A: We have to have comprehensive reform. But those of us who have pursued it have realized that that is a dead-end. We have beat our heads against the wall for a long time. And until we have a more secure border, nobody's going to trust the federal government to move on with the other elements of comprehensive reform.

Q: What about opposition among many Latinos to S.B. 1070?

A: Well, one thing I can tell you is Arizonans are incensed when the president tries to sue the state for trying to do the job that the federal government just won't do. But it's not just rounding up those who are illegal that's the issue; that hasn't been the problem. It's what do you do when you've got them. What do you do to have a humane but effective policy to adjudicate the cases that are already here. And that's the bigger issue.

Source: Washington Post "Ten Questions" 2012 Arizona Senate debate May 2, 2012

Jeff Flake: SB1070 was imprudent & unconstitutional, but let it stand

Q: Was S.B. 1070 a bill you supported?

A: Well, I was at the federal level when it was passed here. And I made comments when it was initially passed--the first version that they put out had some language that could be construed as unconstitutional, certainly. And I said at that time that that was imprudent. And then, the legislature went back in and removed that offending provision. But I've just never been able to get excited about SB 1070, because I've known that that hasn't been the issue. We're able to find those who are here illegally easily enough. It's, what do you do when you've got them?

Q: What action should the Supreme Court take on S.B. 1070?

A: I hope they let it stand. I think all Arizonans are incensed when the federal government tries to sue the state for doing what they simply failed to do. So, I hope they let it stand, but when they do, they'll quickly realize that that was not the issue. The bigger issue is what do you do with a population that's already here?

Source: Washington Post "Ten Questions" 2012 Arizona Senate debate May 2, 2012

Marco Rubio: GOP DREAM Act: visas for going to college or military

A new GOP effort led by Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) to produce a scaled-back version of the DREAM Act is nothing more than election-year politics, argues Democratic Senate candidate Richard Carmona (Ariz.).

Carmona said, "I think it's a political calculation--that they recognized they cannot win their races and stay in office unless they embrace the Hispanic community."

The original DREAM Act would grant young people who were brought illegally to the US as children a path to citizenship provided that they attend college or serve in the military. Rubio's plan would provide not a path to citizenship but rather non-immigrant visas.

Rubio's spokesman said the proposal is a genuine effort to craft a bipartisan solution when it comes to the legal status of young undocumented immigrants. "Senator Rubio is working in good faith on legislation that can win bipartisan support and help undocumented kids who want to join the military or pursue higher education."

Source: Washington Post blog on Arizona Senate debate Apr 26, 2012

Richard Carmona: Vitriolic 'deport everybody' message loses Hispanics

A new GOP effort led by Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) to produce a scaled-back version of the DREAM Act is nothing more than election-year politics, argues Democratic Senate candidate Richard Carmona (Ariz.).

Carmona had some blunt criticism for Republicans on the topic of illegal immigration. "Why do you think they're reworking their initial vitriolic, far-right, 'deport everybody' message?" he asked. "Why? Do you think that all of a sudden there's an epiphany and their hearts have opened up to people who are struggling? I don't think so. I think it's a political calculation--that they recognized they cannot win their races and stay in office unless they embrace the Hispanic community. So, I really feel it's very disingenuous."

The original DREAM Act would grant young people who were brought illegally to the US as children a path to citizenship provided that they attend college or serve in the military. Rubio's plan would provide not a path to citizenship but rather non-immigrant visas.

Source: Washington Post blog on 2012 Arizona Senate debate Apr 26, 2012

Richard Carmona: Secure the border AND pass the DREAM Act

I have a unique perspective of the complexities of this issue--I'm Hispanic and have worked along the border as a deputy sheriff and doctor for more than 25 years. I've witnessed firsthand how our nation's immigration system is broken. I've seen the human cost of not having a workable solution. I've seen the results of the violence and drugs.

First and foremost, we need to ensure our borders are safe and secure. We need to overhaul our immigration laws and support a comprehensive approach that is practical, tough and fair. That means securing the border, cracking down on drug and human smuggling, punishing companies who knowingly hire illegal immigrants, and eliminating a nefarious labor market that exploits those living in the shadows of our society. We should also pass the DREAM Act that creates a path to legalization for children, who, through no fault of their own, were brought into this country at a young age, and are either going to college or have enlisted in the military.

Source: 2012 Senate campaign website, carmonaforarizona.com Mar 15, 2012

Newt Gingrich: By 2014, finish job of constructing a double border fence

Q: Gov. Rick Perry said this: "if you build a 30-foot wall, the 35-foot ladder business gets really good." You signed a pledge to construct a double fence. Why is Gov. Perry wrong?

GINGRICH: He's not wrong. They'd have to have two 35-foot ladders because it's a double fence. Look, the fact is I helped Duncan Hunter pass the first fence bill in San Diego when I was Speaker of the House. It turned out it worked. It worked dramatically. However, it stopped. The further we have gone with the fence, the fewer the people have broken into California. I would finish the job by January 1, 2014, I would initiate a bill that would waive all federal regulations, requirement and studies. I would ask Gov. Brewer, Gov. Martinez, Gov. Brown, and Gov. Perry to become the co-leaders in their state. We would apply as many resources as are needed to be done by Jan. 1, 2014, including moving half of the 23,000 DHS personnel from the DC area to Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. This is a doable thing.

Source: CNN's 2012 GOP Debate on eve of Arizona Primary Feb 23, 2012

John McCain: Campaign ad: "Complete the danged fence!"

In the face of Hayworth's challenge, McCain abandoned his longtime support for comprehensive immigration reform that would recognize reality and provide an eventual path to citizenship for the 11 million illegal aliens already living in the country. Instead, he offered full-throated backing for the border fence he once mocked--"Complete the danged fence!," he demanded in an ad--and sought political cover in the form of an endorsement by his former running mate, Sarah Palin. [Prior to 2004], McCain went to work with Democrats such as the late Ted Kennedy to bring sanity, and humanity, to the nation's long-running debate over illegal immigration. In 2006, I watched McCain tell a group of sensible, blue-suited Republican businessmen in Milwaukee, who asked about immigration, "By the way, I think the fence is least effective. But I'll build the goddamned fence if they want it."
Source: Vanity Fair on 2010 Arizona Senate Republican Primary Debate Nov 1, 2010

John McCain: TV ad: Obama makes protecting AZ border incredibly difficult

In his re-election campaign in Arizona, McCain has often seemed to be running as much against Obama as against his actual opponents. In July he began airing a campaign commercial featuring Paul Babeu, the sheriff of Pinal County, southeast of Phoenix, and the president of the Arizona Sheriff's Association, who has endorsed McCain. "President Obama has made protecting our border incredibly difficult," Babeu says in the ad. "But Arizona has a senator with the courage and character to stand up to a president who is wrong. John McCain. A president versus a senator: doesn't seem like a fair fight. Unless that senator is John McCain."

When the president went to Capitol Hill in May to address the Senate Republicans, McCain accused the president of misrepresenting Arizona's Draconian new immigration law (which McCain had endorsed, and which Obama's Justice Department was preparing to challenge).

Source: Vanity Fair on 2010 Arizona Senate Republican Primary Debate Nov 1, 2010

John McCain: 10-point plan to secure border; then try legal-worker deal

McCain talked about his 10-point plan to secure the border, saying only after that happens can the country address a temporary legal-worker program. "If we don't secure the borders first, we will find ourselves with another group of people who have come to this country illegally, and then we'll have to do it all over again."

Glassman said that while he supports securing the border, it won't work unless there is a way for people to cross legally for work.

Source: Arizona Daily Star coverage of 2010 Arizona Senate debate Sep 27, 2010

Rodney Glassman: Path to citizenship, including fine & back-of-the-line

McCain talked about his 10-point plan to secure the border, saying only after that happens can the country address a temporary legal-worker program.

Glassman said that while he supports securing the border, it won't work unless there is a way for peopl to cross legally for work. And he backed a path to citizenship for those already here, saying they'd have to submit to background checks, learn English, pay a fine and go to the back of the line.

Source: Arizona Daily Star coverage of 2010 Arizona Senate debate Sep 27, 2010

Jim Huffman: More resources focused on securing our borders

The recent litigation in Arizona is symptomatic of a larger problem: The federal government has failed to enforce existing laws placing an undue burden on states. Federal and state governments should be working with each other to solve this problem, not sitting on opposite sides in a courtroom. We need more resources focused on securing our borders and developing reliable guest worker programs. The federal government is failing to control our borders."
Source: Press release, "Arizona Ruling" Jul 28, 2010

Jan Brewer: Feds refuse to pay for costs of illegal immigration

Our federal government has reached new levels of arrogance, foolishness and disregard for the Constitution. The biggest external threat to our budget comes from the federal government--oppressive health care mandates, job-killing environmental restrictions, and continual refusal to pay for costs associated with illegal immigration. And they're just getting warmed up!

The federal government is also failing to control our southern border and refusing to pay for its failure. As you know, I have ordered the Arizona Department of Corrections to return to the custody of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement--as soon as possible--all non-violent criminal aliens for immediate deportation as allowed under existing law.

The cost of incarcerating these criminal aliens is not Arizona's responsibility. It is Washington's legal and moral obligation. This is both insult and injury to Arizona taxpayers. Enough is enough. Secure our border.

Source: Arizona 2010 State of the State Address Jan 11, 2010

Joe Dorman: Constitutional amendment for English as official language

Dorman voted YEA on HJR 1042, English as Official State Language, Joint Resolution Passed House (66-32).
Source: Vote Smart's Synopsis of Arizona Legislative voting records Mar 11, 2009

Janet Napolitano: Keep up intense pressure on border criminals

There is no more fundamental function of government than to protect the public. In the past six years, crime in Arizona has gone down in nearly every category. We have built the nation's first state anti-terrorism center and prepared ourselves to be read for any disaster. We secured increased federal resources at the border, and state task forces have arrested hundreds of human smugglers. We have used innovative methods to attack the tools of the smuggling trade, such as money laundering and fraudulent identification. We have made Arizona the most innovative and active state in the nation in addressing--head-on--the consequences of our nation's broken borders.

We have to keep up this intense pressure on the border criminals who use violence and fraud to smuggle people and drugs into our country. This effort includes a bill I am presenting to you today that goes after those criminals by broadening the human trafficking laws we use to crack down on those who smuggle people across the border.

Source: Arizona 2009 State of the State Address Jan 12, 2009

Ann Kirkpatrick: Greatly strengthen border security; install a Smart Fence

Our immigration system is broken and requires comprehensive reform. We need to greatly strengthen the security along our border. I support providing the Border Patrol with the resources and technology it requires to secure our borders, both north and south. I support a high tech ďSmart FenceĒ where it makes sense, which combines new technology and Border personnel to keep our country secure.
Source: 2008 House campaign website, kirkpatrickforarizona.com Nov 4, 2008

Joe Dorman: Criminalize assisting or employing illegal aliens

Dorman voted YEA on HJR 1042, SCS HB 1804, Immigration Reform, Bill Passed House (84-14).
Source: Vote Smart's Synopsis of Arizona Legislative voting records May 1, 2007

Jim Pederson: The borders are broken; #1 priority for AZ

Q: You said the current immigration system is a failure. How does your plan differ from Sen. Kylís?

PEDERSON: This has to be the #1 priority for AZ. We have 4,000 illegal entries into Arizona every day. The borders are broken. We used to have a guest worker program; people came across the border to work, and then went back home. Now itís a one-way street. People come in and they donít go back. The impact on AZ is estimated to be hundreds of millions per year. The taxpayers of this state should be outraged about the impact on our hospitals, our schools, our law enforcement, our prisons. Letís get practical. Letís get real.

KYL: The question was, I recall, whatís your plan. I didnít hear anything about a plan. I only heard that our borders are broken. I still havenít heard Mr. Pedersonís plan. Itís one thing to talk tough about securing the border, itís quite another to have a realistic plan for how to do it, without giving citizenship to all of the illegal aliens.

Source: Arizona 2006 Senate debate at KPHO in Phoenix Oct 15, 2006

Jim Pederson: Aliens volunteering for ďMandatory DepartureĒ is impractical

PEDERSON: In Kylís bill, thereís a section called ďMandatory Departure.Ē An undocumented person is supposed to report to Customs, voluntarily, and voluntarily agree to be deported. How does that work? Practical? No. Letís get at this problem and solve it.

KYL: We just passed a bill for $13 billion for better border control. Much of that will go to enhancing our Border Patrol, and building fencing and vehicle barriers.

PEDERSON: You say you voted on bills. How many of your bills got passed for the benefit of the people of Arizona? Not one! Iím going to go back there and solve this problem for the people of Arizona in a practical, aggressive way.

KYL: My opponent said ďNot one.Ē The bill I just mentioned is now law. My amendment to double the number of border agents is also now law.

Source: Arizona 2006 Senate debate at KPHO in Phoenix Oct 15, 2006

Jon Kyl: $13B for Border Patrol and border fencing

Q: You said the current immigration system is a failure. How does your plan differ from Sen. Kylís?

PEDERSON: This has to be the #1 priority for AZ. We have 4,000 illegal entries into Arizona every day. The borders are broken. We used to have a guest worker program; people came across the border to work, and then went back home. Now itís a one-way street. People come in and they donít go back. The impact on AZ is estimated to be hundreds of millions per year. The taxpayers of this state should be outraged about the impact on our hospitals, our schools, our law enforcement, our prisons. Letís get practical. Letís get real.

KYL: The question was, I recall, whatís your plan. I didnít hear anything about a plan. I only heard that our borders are broken. I still havenít heard Mr. Pedersonís plan. Itís one thing to talk tough about securing the border, itís quite another to have a realistic plan for how to do it, without giving citizenship to all of the illegal aliens.

Source: Arizona 2006 Senate debate at KPHO, Phoenix (X-ref Pederson) Oct 15, 2006

Jon Kyl: My amendments and ďMandatory DepartureĒ are now law

PEDERSON: In Kylís bill, thereís a section called ďMandatory Departure.Ē An undocumented person is supposed to report to Customs, voluntarily, and voluntarily agree to be deported. How does that work? Practical? No. Letís get at this problem and solve it.

KYL: We just passed a bill for $13 billion for better border control. Much of that will go to enhancing our Border Patrol, and building fencing and vehicle barriers.

PEDERSON: You say you voted on bills. How many of your bills got passed for the benefit of the people of Arizona? Not one! Iím going to go back there and solve this problem for the people of Arizona in a practical, aggressive way.

KYL: My opponent said ďNot one.Ē The bill I just mentioned is now law. My amendment to double the number of border agents is also now law.

Source: Arizona 2006 Senate debate at KPHO, Phoenix (X-ref Pederson) Oct 15, 2006

George W. Bush: Temporary workers ok, but no amnesty

Q: What should we do about the 8,000 people cross our borders illegally every day?

BUSH: Weíre increasing the border security of the US. There ought to be a temporary worker card that allows a willing worker and a willing employer, so long as thereís not an American willing to do that job, to join up. I donít believe we ought to have amnesty. I donít think we ought to reward illegal behavior. There are plenty of people standing in line to become a citizen. If they want to become a citizen, they can stand in line, too. And here is where my opponent and I differ. In September 2003, he supported amnesty for illegal aliens.

KERRY: We need a guest-worker program. We need is to crack down on illegal hiring. And thirdly, we need an earned-legalization program for people who have been here for a long time, stayed out of trouble, got a job, paid their taxes, and their kids are American. We got to start moving them toward full citizenship, out of the shadows.

Source: Third Bush-Kerry Debate, in Tempe Arizona Oct 13, 2004

John Kerry: Temporary workers ok, and earned amnesty ok

Q: What should we do about the 8,000 people cross our borders illegally every day?

BUSH: Weíre increasing the border security of the US. There ought to be a temporary worker card that allows a willing worker and a willing employer, so long as thereís not an American willing to do that job, to join up. I donít believe we ought to have amnesty. I donít think we ought to reward illegal behavior. There are plenty of people standing in line to become a citizen. If they want to become a citizen, they can stand in line, too. And here is where my opponent and I differ. In September 2003, he supported amnesty for illegal aliens.

KERRY: We need a guest-worker program. We need is to crack down on illegal hiring. And thirdly, we need an earned-legalization program for people who have been here for a long time, stayed out of trouble, got a job, paid their taxes, and their kids are American. We got to start moving them toward full citizenship, out of the shadows.

Source: [Xref Bush] Third Bush-Kerry Debate, in Tempe Arizona Oct 13, 2004

Howard Dean: Concerned about immigrants dying in desert crossings

Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean learns of Latin Americans dying in the Southwestern desert and calls for stricter labor and environmental standards in Mexico and other countries to help stifle illegal immigration. ďDeveloping countries must have the same human-rights standards that we do,Ē Dean said. ďThat will stop illegal immigration. Because when you allow labor standards and environmental standards in developing countries, you raise the standard of living and help create the middle class.Ē
Source: Chip Scutari, The Arizona Republic Oct 8, 2003

  • The above quotations are from State of Arizona Politicians: Archives.
  • Click here for definitions & background information on Immigration.
  • Click here for other issues (main summary page).
2016 Presidential contenders on Immigration:
  Republicans:
Amb.John Bolton(MD)
Gov.Jeb Bush(FL)
Dr.Ben Carson(MD)
Gov.Chris Christie(NJ)
Sen.Ted Cruz(TX)
Gov.Mike Huckabee(AR)
Gov.Jon Huntsman(UT)
Gov.Bobby Jindal(LA)
Rep.Peter King(NY)
Gov.Sarah Palin(AK)
Sen.Rand Paul(KY)
Gov.Rick Perry(TX)
Sen.Rob Portman(OH)
Secy.Condi Rice(CA)
Sen.Marco Rubio(FL)
Rep.Paul Ryan(WI)
Sen.Rick Santorum(PA)
Democrats:
Secy.Hillary Clinton(NY)
V.P.Joe Biden(DE)
Gov.Andrew Cuomo(NY)
Mayor Rahm Emanuel(IL)
Gov.Martin O`Malley(MD)
Sen.Bernie Sanders(VT)
Gov.Brian Schweitzer(MT)
Sen.Jim Webb(VA)

2016 Third Party Candidates:
Mayor Michael Bloomberg(I-NYC)
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Donald Trump(NY)
Gov.Jesse Ventura(I-MN)
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