State of Arizona Archives: on Budget & Economy


Jan Brewer: Fixed $3B deficit & replenished Rainy Day Fund

I am proud to report to you today that Arizona's fiscal house is in order and, together, let's keep it that way. We've come a long way in a short time:
  • In 2009, Arizona's budget was irresponsibly drained. After years of unsustainable spending, we had the worst budget deficit of any state.
  • Today, we've reined in government spending by consolidating, eliminating and transforming our operations.
  • In 2009, Arizona had a $3 billion deficit.
  • Today, Arizona boasts a healthy state surplus and a replenished Rainy Day Fund.
  • Most impressively, we ended this past fiscal year with nearly 900 million dollars in the bank.
  • There is no doubt: Arizona is BACK ON TRACK!
  • We also remember that our state was swept up in some of the worst unemployment in our history, and Arizona businesses and families struggled to stay afloat.
    Source: 2014 State of the State Address to Arizona legislature Jan 13, 2014

    Richard Carmona: Supply-side economics is valid

    Carmona allowed that some Republican economic views, like supply-side economics, hold validity, but insisted that "the markets are much more complicated than that." On taxes, however, he said that he agreed with Flake that "we have to do everything we can to lower the tax rates."

    "We don't want to raise taxes now because that'll push us further into a recession, but we need to start generating some income," Carmona added.

    Source: The Hill coverage of 2012 Arizona Senate debates Oct 10, 2012

    David Ruben: Wealth has become concentrated in the hands of a few

    Wealth in the U.S. has become concentrated in the hands of a few, Ruben said. There is nothing wrong with someone being wealthy, but the income imbalance isn't helping the economy.

    If most of the money is concentrated in the hands of a few, then the average person doesn't have any money to spend to keep the economy going, he said. Increasing taxes on the wealthy won't hurt them and would help the economy by supporting services that middle- and low-income people use to help themselves get better jobs

    Source: Kingman Daily Miner on 2012 Arizona Senate debate May 24, 2012

    Rick Santorum: I opposed the Wall Street bailouts and the auto bailout

    Q: You opposed the auto bailout. What do you say to an auto worker who has that job because of the bailout?

    SANTORUM: I would just say to them that I in principle oppose government coming in and bailing out an industry with government dollars and with government manipulation of that market, which is exactly what happened twice, in 2008 & 2009. The first time was the Wall Street bailout. On principle, I opposed the Wall Street bailout, even though I understand reasonable people could disagree. I felt that having the government come in in such a major way and have a huge influence over the direction of that industry, that that would be damaging to what I believe is the best way to resolve these types of problems, which lets the market work, constructive capitalism. And that means pain. I understand that. But it also means limited government and allowing markets to work because we believe they're more efficient over time. I held the same consistent position when it came to the auto bailouts.

    Source: CNN's 2012 GOP Debate on eve of Arizona Primary Feb 22, 2012

    John McCain: Obama's new spending is committing generational theft

    In his debates with Hayworth and Deakin,, McCain accused the president of "committing generational theft" as a result of new spending, and pronounced himself proud to have led the fight against "Obama-care," vowing to "repeal and replace" it next year.
    Source: Vanity Fair on 2010 Arizona Senate Republican Primary Debate Nov 1, 2010

    Jan Brewer: $5B budget deficit is wrong; right is doing the hard things

    If there's one thing I've learned in my years of public service, it's that doing the right thing--almost always means doing the hard thing. That's what it will come down to in the days ahead. Choosing what's tough over what's tempting. Choosing commitmen over ignorance. Choosing government that is necessary--over government that is merely desired. Choosing the truthful over the false. Honesty, versus lies. Right, versus wrong.

    What's wrong you ask?

    Wrong, is the five high-rolling years before I took office when the system was designed and operated to grow government as large as possible. Wrong, is a state budget deficit of nearly $5 billion across 2 fiscal years. Wrong, is arguing "the system worked"--when evidence to the contrary is everywhere and obvious.

    What's right, you ask?

    Right, is telling hard truth even when it exacts a political cost. Right, is acting not in self-interest but on behalf of others. Right, is self-sacrifice ... commitment to the greater good.

    Source: Arizona 2010 State of the State Address Jan 11, 2010

    Janet Napolitano: Balance budget even during recession

    When I took office, our state faced a budget deficit that many thought would sink our priorities for Arizona. Since then--in surplus and in deficit--I have always presented you with a balanced budget plan that moved Arizona forward. That's an important lesson as we look at our situation today: We don't have to go back. We do have to go forward.

    As revenues increased, we set aside money in a rainy day fund, cut taxes and provided tax incentives for important areas like research and development. We implemented 26 of the 36 recommendations of the Citizens Finance Review Commission. We reviewed all state expenditures and undertook actions such as restructuring procurement and curtailing our use of energy. All told, our efforts have saved more than $1 billion.

    We have passed a balanced budget every year, but we still need to make significant adjustments in this year's budget because of the continuing recession. I have already given you a balanced budget plan for 2009.

    Source: Arizona 2009 State of the State Address Jan 12, 2009

    Jan Brewer: Update antiquated laws and remove publication requirements

    Upon taking office, Secretary Brewer identified immediate ways to save taxpayer dollars and address the ongoing state budget deficit. She had legislation introduced to update antiquated laws and remove unnecessary and expensive publication requirements. Secretary Brewer also consolidated her workforce assignments, eliminated staff overtime, and eliminated various other non-essential expenditures.
    Source: Arizona Secretary of State website Dec 3, 2008

    George W. Bush: Pay-as-you-go means you pay, he goes and spends

    Q: You pledged that you would not raise taxes on those making less than $200,000 a year. How can you keep that pledge without running this country deeper into debt?

    KERRY: Iíll tell you exactly how I can do it: by reinstating what Pres. Bush took away, which is called ďpay as you go.Ē During the 1990s, we had pay-as-you-go rules. If you were going to pass something in the Congress, you had to show where you are going to pay for it and how. Pres. Bush is the only president in history to [rescind pay-as-you-go]. Iím going to reverse that. Weíre going to restore the fiscal discipline we had in the 1990s.

    BUSH: Iíll tell you what PAYGO means, when youíre a senator from Massachusetts, PAYGO means: You pay, and he goes ahead and spends. Heís proposed $2.2 trillion of new spending, and yet the so-called tax on the rich raises $800 billion by his account. There is a tax gap. And guess who usually ends up filling the tax gap? The middle class.

    Source: [Xref Kerry] Third Bush-Kerry Debate, in Tempe Arizona Oct 13, 2004

    George W. Bush: The middle class will have to fill the Kerry tax gap

    Kerry had been a senator for 20 years, he voted to increase taxes 98 times. When theyíd try to reduce taxes he voted against that 127 times. He talks about being a fiscal conservative or fiscally sound but he voted 277 times to waive the budget caps, which would have cost the taxpayers $4.2 trillion. He talks about pay-go. When youíre a senator from Massachusetts, when youíre a colleague of Ted Kennedy, pay-go means you pay and he goes ahead and spends. Heís proposed $2.2 trillion of new spending and yet the so-called tax on the rich, which is also a tax on many small business owners in America, raises $600 billion by our account, $800 billion by his account. There is a tax gap. And guess who usually ends up filling the tax gap? The middle class. I proposed a detailed budget. I send up my budget man to the Congress and he says hereís how weíre going to reduce the deficit in half by five years, it requires pro-growth policies that grow our economy and fiscal sanity in the halls of Congress.
    Source: Third Bush-Kerry Debate, in Tempe Arizona Oct 13, 2004

    John Kerry: Restore pay-as-you-go for fiscal discipline

    Q: You pledged that you would not raise taxes on those making less than $200,000 a year. How can you keep that pledge without running this country deeper into debt?

    KERRY: Iíll tell you exactly how I can do it: by reinstating what Pres. Bush took away, which is called ďpay as you go.Ē During the 1990s, we had pay-as-you-go rules. If you were going to pass something in the Congress, you had to show where you are going to pay for it and how. Pres. Bush is the only president in history to [rescind pay-as-you-go]. Iím going to reverse that. Weíre going to restore the fiscal discipline we had in the 1990s.

    BUSH: Iíll tell you what PAYGO means, when youíre a senator from Massachusetts, PAYGO means: You pay, and he goes ahead and spends. Heís proposed $2.2 trillion of new spending, and yet the so-called tax on the rich raises $800 billion by his account. There is a tax gap. And guess who usually ends up filling the tax gap? The middle class.

    Source: Third Bush-Kerry Debate, in Tempe Arizona Oct 13, 2004

    John Kerry: Shown exactly how to pay for every plan Iíve laid out

    Every plan that I have laid out - my health care plan, my plan for education, my plan for kids to be able to get better college loans - Iíve shown exactly how Iím going to pay for those. We pass, hopefully, the McCain-Kerry Commission, which identified some $60 billion that we can get. We shut the loophole, which has American workers actually subsidizing the loss of their own job. They just passed an expansion of that loophole in the last few days, $43 billion of giveaways including favors to the oil and gas industry and to people importing ceiling fans from China. Iím going to stand up and fight for the American workers and Iím going to do it in a way thatís fiscally sound. I show how I pay for the health care, how we pay for education. I have a manufacturing jobs credit, we pay for it by shutting that loophole overseas. We raise the student loans. I pay for it by changing the relationship with the banks. This president has never once vetoed one bill. First president in 100 years not to do that.
    Source: Third Bush-Kerry Debate, in Tempe Arizona Oct 13, 2004

    Janet Napolitano: Provides funding for the priorities without raising taxes

    I will release a budget proposal that is fiscally responsible, provides funding for the priorities I have discussed - and does so without raising taxes. My Efficiency Review team has worked with thousands of state employees to identify permanent savings and cost avoidances that will save the state at least $843 million over the next five years alone. I am pleased to submit a budget that will fund a leaner, smarter government for the new Arizona.
    Source: 2004 State of the State speech to Arizona Legislature Jan 12, 2004

    George W. Bush: Guarantees future surpluses with his tax plan

    Q: Letís suppose that the projected surpluses in your tax plan fail to materialize in full or in part. What part of your tax package gets dropped first? A: I refuse to accept the premise that surpluses are going to decline if Iím the president. I think theyíre going to increase, because my plan will increase productivity by cutting marginal rates.
    Source: Phoenix Arizona GOP Debate Dec 7, 1999

    Steve Forbes: Fedís bizarre theory: prosperity causes inflation

    Q: What in your view has Mr. Greenspan done wrong? A: The foundations for todayís prosperity were laid by Ronald Reagan in the early 1980ís. Mr. Greenspan did a very good job in the early 1990ís. But recently heís fallen prey to this crazy theory that prosperity causes inflation. So theyíre trying to slow the economy down by raising interest rates. Itís like a doctor saying youíre in great health, so we have to make you sick a little bit. Itís a bizarre theory. Itís going to hurt our economy.
    Source: Phoenix Arizona GOP Debate Dec 7, 1999

    • The above quotations are from State of Arizona Politicians: Archives.
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    Page last updated: Aug 14, 2014