State of South Carolina secondary Archives: on Civil Rights


Tim Scott: Government shouldn't redefine marriage

Question topic: Marriage is a union of one man and one woman. No government has the authority to alter this definition.

Scott: Agree

Source: Faith2Action iVoterGuide on 2014 South Carolina Senate race Sep 30, 2014

Brad Hutto: Equal pay for equal work is the next women's milestone

Today marks the 94th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution guaranteeing women the right to vote. This marked a major milestone for equality in our country. I am committed to another equality milestone--equal pay for equal work! And as South Carolina's new U.S. Senator I will work tirelessly to end this pointless discrimination.

Right now in this country, women earn roughly 20% less than men doing the same job. You and I know this is wrong, plain and simple. But Lindsey Graham seems to think it's just fine. Just this Spring, Graham voted against considering the Paycheck Fairness Act--a law that would have safeguard against wage discrimination based on gender. I'll make equal work for equal pay a priority. As your next Senator, I'll not simply vote for but I will sponsor equal pay for equal work legislation.

Source: 2014 South Carolina Senate campaign website, BradHutto.com Sep 1, 2014

Thomas Ravenel: Stay out of marriage, but if not, treat gays equally

On marriage equality, he says he'd rather see the government stay out of marriage altogether. "But if we're going to have equal treatment under the law, if you're going to give certain benefits to heterosexual couples that are married, likewise treatment must be given to those who are gay and married," he said. "A lot of Republicans are intimidated by strident, hateful anti-gay rhetoric from religious right leaders. I'm not cowed by these people. I don't have to be."
Source: TheDailyBeast blog on 2014 South Carolina Senate race Jul 4, 2014

Lee Bright: Government shouldn't redefine marriage

Question topic: Marriage is a union of one man and one woman. No government has the authority to alter this definition.

Bright: Strongly Agree

Source: Faith2Action iVoterGuide on 2014 South Carolina Senate race Jul 2, 2014

Thomas Ravenel: Government should stay out of our bedrooms &our boardrooms

Ravenel has consistently described himself as a fiscally conservative and socially moderate libertarian. He's pro-gay marriage and in favor of ending the war on drugs. "The government should be limited, small, and should stay out of both the bedrooms and our boardrooms," he says in one episode.

Ravenel, with a chiseled jaw and slicked-back hair straight out of central casting for a Southern politician, has good reason to hope that voters aren't overly concerned with what goes on in peoples' bedrooms.

Source: Mother Jones magazine on 2014 South Carolina Senate race May 12, 2014

Rick Wade: First all-black U.S. Senate race in recent memory

Democratic heavyweight Rick Wade will challenge Sen. Tim Scott (R) in 2014, sources tell FITS--setting up a high-profile (and potentially historic) matchup in the Palmetto State's "other" US Senate contest.

Wade filed paperwork with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) this week--and if he and Scott earn their respective party's nominations (as they are expected to do) it would set up the first all-black U.S. Senate race in recent memory. Maybe ever.

"A Scott-Wade matchup would allow South Carolina to see a campaign unlike any it--and few if any other states--has ever seen: a bona fide race for U.S. Senate between two African-American candidates," a liberal columnist wrote earlier this year.

Richland County councilwoman Joyce Dickerson--another black Democrat--has said she's running against Scott in 2014, but she's not viewed as a credible candidate.

We expect Wade--who helped lead Obama's 2008 minority turnout effort--to help mobilize black voters in a big way in 2014.

Source: FITS News on 2014 South Carolina Senate race Dec 13, 2013

Jay Stamper: Asked by Party to exit race after supporting gay marriage

As many of you know, I recently came out in favor of marriage equality. I knew it was politically risky in a state like South Carolina, but I also knew it was the right thing to do.

Several days after my announcement, a state party official summoned me to his office. To my disbelief he tried to persuade me to drop out of the race. I said no thanks.

Apparently, certain well-connected "party elders" believe that my candidacy is a distraction that will only hurt Democratic gubernatorial candidate Vincent Sheheen by highlighting his opposition to marriage equality and women's reproductive rights.

Now, my campaign is meeting resistance from the last place I expected: from within the state party establishment. I'm proud to be a Democrat. But the party is more than just a handful of well-connected insiders sitting in an office building. It's you, it's me, it's millions of "ordinary" people across the country who believe in equal rights and equal opportunity for all. I'm not going to back down.

Source: Press release on 2014 South Carolina Senate race Nov 1, 2013

Herman Cain: Ignoring DOMA is treasonous breach of presidential duty

Q: You said that the administration's decision not to defend the Defense of Marriage Act was "a breach of presidential duty bordering on treason." Pretty strong language; isn't this country moving toward acceptance of gay marriage?

A: The Defense of Marriage Act is the law of the land, signed in 1996 by Pres. Bill Clinton. In his oath of office the president says he is supposed to protect and uphold the laws of the USA. To me that is asking the Justice Department to not uphold the law

Source: 2011 GOP primary debate in South Carolina May 5, 2011

Ron Paul: Government is totally unnecessary for gay marriage laws

Q: In Dec. 2007, you were asked if gays should be allowed to marry. You said, "Sure; they can do whatever they want and can call it whatever they want." Are you advocating legalizing gay marriage?

A: As a matter of fact, I spent a whole chapter in my new book on marriage. And I think it's very important seeing that I've been married for 54 years now. I think the government should just be out of it. I think it should be done by the church as a private contract and we shouldn't have this argument of who's married and who isn't married. I have my standards but I shouldn't impose my standards on others. Others have their standards and they have no right to impose their marriage standards on me. But if we want to have something to say about marriage, it should be at the state level and not at the federal level. Just get the government out of it. It's one area where it's totally unnecessary, and they've caused more trouble than necessary.

Source: 2011 GOP primary debate in South Carolina May 5, 2011

John McCain: Confederate flag on top of capitol was wrong; in front is ok

Q: Should South Carolina be free to fly the Confederate flag from state buildings. In 2000, you said yes. You have since called that one of your worst examples of political cowardice. That flag is still flying in front of the Statehouse. Should it come down?

A: It is not flying on top of the capitol. Yes, I was wrong when I said that I believed that it was up to the state of South Carolina. Now, after long negotiation amongst most parties, there is an agreement that that flag no longer flies on top of the capitol of the state of South Carolina.

Q: It is flying in FRONT of the capitol now.

A: Almost all parties involved in those negotiations believe that thatís a reasonable solution to this issue. I support it. I still believe that it should not have flown over the capitol, and I was wrong when I said that it was a state issue. But now I think it has been settled, and I think itís time that we all moved on, on this issue -- especially the people of South Carolina.

Source: 2007 Republican Debate in South Carolina May 15, 2007

Barack Obama: Put the Confederate flag in a museum, not the state house

Q: The NAACP has asked tourists, groups and sporting events not to come to South Carolina until the confederate flag has been removed from the statehouse grounds. Do you agree with that? Why are you, the candidates, in South Carolina if they support the NAACP?

A: I think that the Confederate flag should be put in a museum. Thatís where it belongs. But weíve got an enormous debate thatís taking place in this country right now. And weíve got to engage the people of South Carolina in that debate.

Source: 2007 South Carolina Democratic primary debate, on MSNBC Apr 26, 2007

Chris Dodd: Supports civil unions but opposes gay marriage

Q: Your state of Connecticut has legalized civil unions for gay people. Is there a difference between gay marriage and civil unions?

A: I always begin this question by asking people to consider what they would do in the case of their own children. I have two very young daughters who one day may have a different sexual orientation than their parents. How would I like them treated as adults? What kind of homes, what kind of jobs, what kind of retirement would they be allowed to have? I think if you ask yourself that question, you come to the conclusion that I hope most Americans would: that they ought to be able to have those loving relationships sanctioned. Iím proud of the fact that my state has done so. I believe that civil unions are appropriate and proper. I donít support same-sex marriage. And the distinction there is one of what the traditions are over the years. But, basically, thatís a distinction I make. Strongly support those civil unions.

Source: 2007 South Carolina Democratic primary debate, on MSNBC Apr 26, 2007

  • The above quotations are from State of South Carolina Politicians: secondary Archives.
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