State of South Carolina secondary Archives: on Abortion


Henry McMaster: Stop providing state funds to abortion clinics

The most important function of government is providing for the safety and security of the people. That extends to all life--born and unborn, young and old. I believe that human life begins at conception. That's why I directed state agencies
Source: 2018 State of the State speech to South Carolina legislature Jan 24, 2018

Yancey McGill: Opposes abortion, even as Democratic State Senator

McGill, the last Democrat to hold statewide office, said he switched parties last week after years of leaning toward pro-Republican stances on government spending and regulation as well as abortion.

"I have backed a lot of conservative issues over the years, and people have asked me why not consider joining the (Republican) party," said McGill, who spent 25 years representing a heavily Democratic district in Williamsburg and Georgetown counties.

Source: The State webzine on 2018 South Carolina Gubernatorial race Mar 21, 2017

Thomas Dixon: Women choose what is best for their bodies

Source: 2016 South Carolina Senate campaign website DixonForSC.com Aug 8, 2016

Donald Trump: Planned Parenthood does great work on women's health

Sen. Ted CRUZ: For most of his life, Trump's policies have been liberal. For most of his life, he has described himself as pro-choice and a supporter of partial birth abortion. Today, he supports federal tax payer funding for Planned Parenthood. I disagree with him on that.

TRUMP: You are the biggest liar. Today, we had robo-calls saying. "Donald Trump is not going to run in South Carolina," -- where I'm leading by a lot." I'm not going to vote for Ted Cruz. This guy will say anything, nasty guy. Now I know why he doesn't have one endorsement from any of his colleagues.

CRUZ: You said, "Planned Parenthood does wonderful things and we should not defund it."

TRUMP: It does do wonderful things but not as it relates to abortion. There are wonderful things having to do with women's health, but not when it comes to abortion.

Source: 2016 CBS Republican primary debate in South Carolina Feb 13, 2016

Tim Scott: Human life begins at conception

Question topic: Human life begins at conception and deserves legal protection at every stage until natural death.

Scott: Agree

Question topic: Should abortion be allowed under extenuating circumstances? If so, what circumstances?

Scott: (Did not answer)

Source: Faith2Action iVoterGuide on 2014 South Carolina Senate race Sep 30, 2014

Thomas Ravenel: Hired abortion activist as campaign Communications Director

Thomas Ravenel hires pro-abortion activist as communications director: Liberal abortion crusader joins forces with convicted drug felon:

Amy Brandstadter Lazenby, a liberal contributor to the anti-Republican and gossip-monger Web-log, FITS News, has been hired as the Communications Director for the Thomas Ravenel Senate campaign. A Sunday press release bears her name and title. Lazenby's name is also included in an Aug. 17 release.

Lazenby, who claims she's not a lobbyist, but a legislative advocate, is married to the wealthy owner of a large personal injury law firm. She has contributed several written pieces to FITS. Most of her activism is based on a pro-abortion agenda. She has also promoted the homosexual lobby for government-funded perpetuating of their cause.

Ravenel claims to be a Libertarian. But could his choice of Lazenby be a sign that he is gone totally leftwing?

Source: SC Politics & Sports Digest: 2014 South Carolina Senate race Aug 24, 2014

Lee Bright: Human life begins at conception

Question topic: Human life begins at conception and deserves legal protection at every stage until natural death.

Bright: Strongly Agree

Question topic: Should abortion be allowed under extenuating circumstances? If so, what circumstances?

Bright: Life begins at conception, therefore the only exception is that a mother enjoys the right of self-defense if her life is threatened.

Source: Faith2Action iVoterGuide on 2014 South Carolina Senate race Jul 2, 2014

Jay Stamper: Limiting abortion isn't limited-government conservatism

Jay Stamper is plotting his campaign as a Democratic candidate in a Republican stronghold. "I'm going to challenge Republicans on what kind of conservative values they are voting for," Stamper said.

During a lunch with Spartanburg County Democrats, Stamper attacked Sen. Lindsey Graham's loyalty to conservative principles and said spending trillions of dollars on foreign engagements isn't fiscal conservatism, limiting abortion and marriage isn't limited government conservatism, and supporting the National Security Administration's data collection isn't constitutional conservatism.

"I will settle for their grudging and reluctant support," Stamper said of Republicans and independents he hopes to sway.

Source: Spartanburg Herald-Journal: 2014 South Carolina Senate race Jan 13, 2014

Mitt Romney: Courts added tax-paid abortions to RomneyCare; not me

GINGRICH: Governor Romney has said that he had an experience in a lab and became pro-life, and I accept that. After he became pro-life, RomneyCare does pay for tax-paid abortions. RomneyCare has written into it Planned Parenthood, the largest abortion provider in the country, by name.

ROMNEY: First, in RomneyCare, there's no mention of abortion whatsoever. The Massachusetts Supreme Court decided that all times that there was any subsidy of health care in Massachusetts that one received abortion care. That was not done by the legislature; I would have vetoed such a thing. That was done by the courts. #2, it's true, somewhere in that bill of ours, 70 pages, there's the mention of the words "Planned Parenthood," but it describes payment structures.

SANTORUM: You do not specifically mention that abortion is not covered. You can't say: Oh, gee, surprise, the court made us cover abortions. He knew very well that the court would make him cover abortions.

Source: South Carolina 2012 GOP debate hosted by CNN's John King Jan 19, 2012

Mitt Romney: I had no litmus test for appointing judges, but I'm pro-life

GINGRICH: Governor Romney did appoint pro-abortion judges.

ROMNEY: I appointed probably 50 or 60 judges--at the trial court level, mostly, the great majority. These were former prosecutors; 80% of them former prosecutors. We don't have a litmus test for appointing judges--asking them if they're pro-life or not pro-life. These were people going after crimes and the like. I am pro-life. And the Massachusetts Citizens for Life and several other family-oriented groups wrote a letter two weeks ago and said they'd watched my record, that I was an avidly pro-life governor. I am a pro-life governor; I am a pro-life individual. Is there any possibility that I've ever made a mistake in that regard, I didn't see something that I should have seen? Possibly. But you can count on me, as president, to pursue a policy that protects the life of unborn, whether here in this country or overseas. And I'll reverse the policies of this president.

Source: South Carolina 2012 GOP debate hosted by CNN's John King Jan 19, 2012

Rick Santorum: FactCheck: Under 1/4 of pregnancies end in abortion, not 1/3

Santorum wrongly claimed that "one in three pregnancies end in abortion" in the US when saying that abortion was to blame for funding problems for Social Security and Medicare. Santorum said: "The reason Social Security is in big trouble is we don't have enough workers to support the retirees. Well, a third of all the young people in America are not in America today because of abortion, because one in three pregnancies end in abortion."

First, fewer than one in four pregnancies ended in abortion in 2008, the most recent statistics available. Second, Santorum assumes the population is lower by a number equal to total abortions, but that's not the case. One analyst told us "most women obtain abortions to postpone childbearing not to prevent it altogether" and an unknown number of pregnancies would have ended in miscarriage.

Source: FactCheck.org on 2011 GOP primary debate in South Carolina May 6, 2011

Gary Johnson: Right to choose up until viability of the fetus

Q: Most Republicans and everyone else on the stage but you identified themselves as pro-life; you have said that abortion should be legal until the fetus is viable. How do you hope to woo conservative GOP voters with that position?

JOHNSON: I support a woman's right to choose up until viability of the fetus, as governor of New Mexico, I would have signed a bill banning late term abortion, I've always favored parental notification, I've always favored counseling and I've always favored the notion that public funds should not be used for abortion. So running for Governor of New Mexico in a state that was 2:1 Democrat, I really didn't get that vote in the primary, but I'd like to think that I got all of those votes in the general election and that's a reality here also, for those individuals that hold that as their number one issue, I'm not going to get that vote, I would hope to get that vote if I were to move on to the general election.

Source: 2011 GOP primary debate in South Carolina May 5, 2011

Tim Pawlenty: Stem-cell research ok on previous embryos, but not new ones

Q: federal court struck down the ban on using federal funds for embryonic stem cell research. You identify yourself as strongly pro-life but don't oppose government funding research on existing stem cell lines already derived from embryos. Isn't that still spending taxpayer money on elements generated by at some point destroying an embryo?

A: Stem cell research holds great promise and I support stem cell research. I think it should be adult-derived. Most of the therapies and breakthrough that we are seeing in terms of treatment are coming from adult-derived stem cell research. I strongly support that. As to embryonic stem cell research, I don't think we should pursue that, although Pres. Bush authorized the use of research on certain ste cell lines for which the embryo had already previously been destroyed before the issue came to his desk. I did support his approach for that limited window of stem cell research on those existing lines for which the embryo had already been destroyed.

Source: 2011 GOP primary debate in South Carolina May 5, 2011

Tim Scott: Don't require 24 hours after ultrasound; 1 hour is enough

Legislative record:Amendment tabled by House, 73-38; Rep. Scott voted YEA to table (against the amendment).
Source: 2009 South Carolina legislature voting records for H. 3245 Feb 17, 2009

Lee Bright: Require 24 hours after ultrasound before abortion

Legislative record:Amendment tabled by House, 73-38; Sen. Bright sponsored the amendment.
Source: 2009 South Carolina legislature voting records for H. 3245 Jan 13, 2009

Mike Huckabee: “Hate but allow abortion” is like “hate but allow slavery”

Q [to GIULIANI]: You have said that you personally hate abortion but support a woman’s right to choose. Gov. Huckabee says that’s like saying, “I hate slavery, but people can go ahead and practice it.” Tell me why he’s wrong.

GIULIANI: There is no circumstances under which I could possibly imagine anyone choosing slavery or supporting slavery. There are millions of Americans, who are as of good conscience as we are, who make a different choice about abortion. And I think in a country where you want to keep government out of people’s lives from the point of view of coercion, you have to respect that.

Q: Governor, has the mayor persuaded you?

HUCKABEE: He has not. I have great respect for the mayor because he’s been honest about his position

Source: [X-ref Giuliani] 2007 Republican Debate in South Carolina May 15, 2007

Rudy Giuliani: Allowing choice keeps government out of people’s lives

Q [to GIULIANI]: You have said that you personally hate abortion but support a woman’s right to choose. Gov. Huckabee says that’s like saying, “I hate slavery, but people can go ahead and practice it.” Tell me why he’s wrong.

GIULIANI: There is no circumstances under which I could possibly imagine anyone choosing slavery or supporting slavery. There are millions of Americans, who are as of good conscience as we are, who make a different choice about abortion. And I think in a country where you want to keep government out of people’s lives from the point of view of coercion, you have to respect that.

Q: Governor, has the mayor persuaded you?

HUCKABEE: He has not. I have great respect for the mayor because he’s been honest about his position

Source: 2007 Republican Debate in South Carolina May 15, 2007

Rudy Giuliani: Seek bipartisan ways to reduce abortion & increase adoption

Q [to GILMORE]: You like to say that “Rudy McRomney” is not a conservative & he knows he’s not a conservative. Why?

GILMORE: Giuliani has said that he is against federal funding of abortions, but is in favor of federal financing of abortions. But then on the other hand, he said in the last debate he was against the Hyde Amendment.

Q [to GIULIANI]: You’re pro-choice, you’re pro-gay rights, you’re pro-gun control; Are those the stands of a conservative?

GIULIANI: I think Rudy McRomney wouldn’t make a bad ticket. And I kind of like the order. According to George Will, I ran the most conservative government in the last 50 years in NYC. I look for ways in which we can come together. I think we can all agree that we should seek reductions in abortion. I ultimately do believe in a woman’s right of choice, but I think that there are ways in which we can reduce abortions. Abortions went down 16% & adoptions went up 133% when I was mayor. We can work together and achieve results that we all want

Source: 2007 Republican Debate in South Carolina May 15, 2007

Sam Brownback: Opposes abortion even for women pregnant by rapists

Q: Since you’ve opposed abortion in every instance except to save the life of the mother, how would you explain to a rape victim, who does not believe that life begins at conception, why her trauma should be compounded by carrying the child to term?

A: That would be a very difficult situation. But the basic question remains. Is the child in the womb a person? Is it viable life? Is it an innocent person? And if it is a person, it’s entitled to respect. We talk about abortion, but abortion is a procedure This is a life that we’re talking about. And it’s a terrible situation where there’s a rape that’s involved or incest. But it nonetheless remains that this is a child that we’re talking about doing this to, of ending the life of this child. Will that make the woman in a better situation if that’s what takes place? I don’t think so, and I think we can explain it when we look at it for what it is: a beautiful child of a loving God, that we ought to protect in all circumstances in all places.

Source: 2007 Republican Debate in South Carolina May 15, 2007

Tommy Thompson: New stem cell research means embryos need not be destroyed

Q: Some researchers say the lines of embryonic stem cells that Pres. Bush has approved federal funding for are inadequate. Tell me why they’re wrong.

A: Embryonic stem cells, as well as adult stem cells, show great promise. The president set forth a policy about 72 embryonic lines that could be federally funded and could be used for research with federal funds.

Q: Researchers say there are not that many.

A: Well, there’s not that many. There’s 22 being used. There’s at least three more that have not been used. Some of them were not able to be viable, some of them were not able to have what we call pluripotency, and so they were not able to continue. But there is some tremendous new research, going on with amniotic fluids. There’s also some new research that says adult stem cells, if you do it the right way, will have the same characteristics as embryonic stem cells. So until this research is done, we do not have to destroy any more embryos. There’s enough lines right now.

Source: 2007 Republican Debate in South Carolina May 15, 2007

Barack Obama: Trust women to make own decisions on partial-birth abortion

Q: What us your view on the decision on partial-birth abortion and your reaction to most of the public agreeing with the court’s holding?

A: I think that most Americans recognize that this is a profoundly difficult issue for the women and families who make these decisions. They don’t make them casually. And I trust women to make these decisions in conjunction with their doctors and their families and their clergy. And I think that’s where most Americans are. Now, when you describe a specific procedure that accounts for less than 1% of the abortions that take place, then naturally, people get concerned, and I think legitimately so. But the broader issue here is: Do women have the right to make these profoundly difficult decisions? And I trust them to do it. There is a broader issue: Can we move past some of the debates around which we disagree and can we start talking about the things we do agree on? Reducing teen pregnancy; making it less likely for women to find themselves in these circumstances.

Source: 2007 South Carolina Democratic primary debate, on MSNBC Apr 26, 2007

Chris Dodd: Courts should decide abortion cases based on woman’s health

Q: You were the only senator on this stage to vote to confirm Chief Justice Roberts. Do you regret your vote?

A: No. I’m disappointed terribly by the decision that he reached the other day [allowing states to outlaw partial-birth abortion], because he did something he said he wouldn’t do. He said during his confirmation hearings that he would uphold precedent. That was a very important answer he gave to me. He walked away from the woman’s health. For 34 years, the woman’s health has been a major consideration on this issue since Roe versus Wade was first decided. And to deviate from that, to me, was a major, major setback here. I happen to believe a woman has a right to choose. I’ve voted that way and done that, supported that for the 26 years I’ve been in the US Senate. Supporting expanding adoption, children’s health issues--these are things I’ve worked on for the last 26 years, having started the children’s caucus in the US Senate, worked on children’s health issues.

Source: 2007 South Carolina Democratic primary debate, on MSNBC Apr 26, 2007

Dennis Kucinich: Litmus test on Roe, but as part of a culture of life

Q: As president would you have a specific litmus test question on Roe v. Wade that you would ask of your nominees for the high court?

A: Any of my appointments to the high court would necessarily reflect my thinking. I don’t know how it could be otherwise. I intend to be a president who’s a healer, who understands that this country has been put in a debate that has torn it apart. But the truth of the matter is, it’s possible to take a course of action where you can get all the people of America in support of a culture of life which includes prenatal care, postnatal care, child care, universal health care, a living wage, all those things that give support to life. And we also need to listen carefully to those who are concerned about abortion. At the same time, a healer as president would help reconcile this nation, and cause a woman’s right to privacy to be protected unquestioningly, protect Roe v. Wade, but also go out and listen to people and engage people and open up hearts.

Source: 2007 South Carolina Democratic primary debate, on MSNBC Apr 26, 2007

Joe Biden: Nominees should agree on constitutional right to privacy

Q: As president would you have a specific litmus test question on Roe v. Wade that you would ask of your nominees for the high court?

A: I strongly support Roe v. Wade. I wouldn’t have a specific question but I would make sure that the people I sent to be nominated for the Supreme Court shared my values; and understood that there is a right to privacy in the United States Constitution. That’s why I led the fight to defeat Bork, Roberts Alito, and Thomas.

Source: 2007 South Carolina Democratic primary debate, on MSNBC Apr 26, 2007

John Edwards: Gov’t should not decide for women on partial-birth abortion

Q: What is your view on the decision on partial-birth abortion and most of the public agreeing with the court’s holding?

A: This decision by the Supreme Court is a perfect example of what’s at stake in this election. The kind of people that will be appointed to the US Supreme Court by the next president will control whether a woman’s freedom, freedom to choose, make her own health care decisions will be made by her or will be made by the government or by some men sitting on the US Supreme Court. Now, on the issue of abortion, I believe in a woman’s right to choose, but I think this is an extraordinarily difficult issue for America. I think it is very important for the president of the United States to recognize--while I believe the government should not make these health-care decisions for women--I believe they should have the freedom to make them themselves--this is a very difficult issue for many people. And I think we have to show respect for people who have different views about this.

Source: 2007 South Carolina Democratic primary debate, on MSNBC Apr 26, 2007

  • The above quotations are from State of South Carolina Politicians: secondary Archives.
  • Click here for definitions & background information on Abortion.
  • Click here for other issues (main summary page).
2016 Presidential contenders on Abortion:
  Republicans:
Gov.Jeb Bush(FL)
Dr.Ben Carson(MD)
Gov.Chris Christie(NJ)
Sen.Ted Cruz(TX)
Carly Fiorina(CA)
Gov.Jim Gilmore(VA)
Sen.Lindsey Graham(SC)
Gov.Mike Huckabee(AR)
Gov.Bobby Jindal(LA)
Gov.John Kasich(OH)
Gov.Sarah Palin(AK)
Gov.George Pataki(NY)
Sen.Rand Paul(KY)
Gov.Rick Perry(TX)
Sen.Rob Portman(OH)
Sen.Marco Rubio(FL)
Sen.Rick Santorum(PA)
Donald Trump(NY)
Gov.Scott Walker(WI)
Democrats:
Gov.Lincoln Chafee(RI)
Secy.Hillary Clinton(NY)
V.P.Joe Biden(DE)
Gov.Martin O`Malley(MD)
Sen.Bernie Sanders(VT)
Sen.Elizabeth Warren(MA)
Sen.Jim Webb(VA)

2016 Third Party Candidates:
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Roseanne Barr(PF-HI)
Robert Steele(L-NY)
Dr.Jill Stein(G,MA)
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Page last updated: Feb 12, 2018