State of Massachusetts secondary Archives: on Principles & Values


Setti Warren: Supports 5 out of 8 of ORMA's "People's Platform"

Of the 8 specific federal legislative proposals in ORMA's "People's Platform," I am fully comfortable supporting, without reservation, the first 5:
  1. Single Payer Healthcare
  2. Free Public College
  3. $15 Minimum Wage
  4. Equal Access to Abortion Coverage in Health Insurance
  5. Automatic Voter Registration
I will work to implement each of these in Massachusetts as governor.

[The other three are: Justice is Not For Sale Act; Inclusive Prosperity Act; and Keep It In the Ground Act].

Source: ORMA questionnaire on 2018 Massachusetts governor race Dec 20, 2017

Martha Coakley: I know how tough my 2010 Senate loss was for many people

Coakley has been leading all the opinion polls but barely skimmed into second place with 23% of convention votes. Some delegates seemed anxious that she will not be a winnable candidate in the general election because of her stunning 2010 loss to Republican Scott Brown in the U.S. Senate special election. "The 2010 Senate election was very painful for a lot of people in this room," Coakley said in her speech to delegates, trying to tackle that elephant in the room.

"I felt it really was important to say to people, 'I know how tough that loss was,' " Coakley said afterward. "I think people recognize that we don't win every race."

Coakley said she's jumping back into the political ring to continue to fight for issues she's worked on as attorney general. With a tight smile and a wave, she insisted she was pleased with Saturday's results. "It's terrific. We had a goal coming in that we wanted to get our 15% to get on the ballot," Coakley said. "We've had a great day."

Source: WBUR on 2014 Massachusetts gubernatorial race at Convention Jun 15, 2014

Steve Grossman: We need a job creator, not a prosecutor, for governor

"I'm going to make the argument that this state needs a progressive job creator, not a prosecutor as the next governor," Grossman said after the 90-minute debate. With the struggles of past attorneys general to ascend to the governor's office, Grossman seemed to use the word "prosecutor" as a negative to describe his chief rival for the Democratic nomination. "Martha Coakley is a prosecutor. That's fundamentally what she is," Grossman said. Asked to explain what he meant, Grossman said, "She spent her life as a prosecutor. We need a job creator."

Coakley said she was not paying attention to the poll numbers, and said her career as a prosecutor in Middlesex County and at the state level was not a detriment to her campaign. She noted her fights against bank home foreclosures and challenging the Defense of Marriage Act.

Source: WWLP 22-News on 2014 Massachusetts gubernatorial debate Jun 10, 2014

Richard Tisei: Iconoclast in GOP; former state Senate minority leader

The candidate: Richard Tisei, former state Senate minority leader.

One thing remains the same in Tisei's 2nd straight run for the Democrat-held seat in Massachusetts' 6th District--as an openly-gay New Englander, Tisei is an iconoclast in his party.

The Republican said that he does not find himself in a hostile party. In fact, given that he represents one of the party's best chances to once again hold a New England congressional seat--something he thinks is necessary for the GOP to be a national party--Tisei is seeing plenty of support. "I feel very comfortable with the history of the party," Tisei said, mentioning the GOP's involvement in women's suffrage and the Civil Rights movement. "I'm also a small business owner. I support our free enterprise system," Tisei added. "People should be making choices for themselves, rather than the government making choices for them. So in a lot of the philosophies, both economic and as far as individual rights go, I feel very comfortable in the party.

Source: Rollcall.com e-zine Q&A on 2014 Massachusetts House race Mar 26, 2014

Don Berwick: Son of a Connecticut doctor; attended med school in Boston

Q: Let's talk about your origins. You're a New Englander, right? You grew up in Connecticut?

A: That's right. I grew up in a small town in Connecticut called Moodus. My father was a G.P. in the town. He made house calls, delivered babies--did everything. He did fluoroscopy in his office. He rounded out every day of my young life at the hospital 17 miles away--a real old-style G.P.

Q: And then you went off to Harvard for college and medical school. And you also have a master's degree in public policy from the Kennedy School, and you trained in pediatrics at Boston Children's Hospital. Is that right?

A: Yes. I actually did a year of internal medicine first, at Massachusetts General Hospital as a medical intern. I loved that, but I always had a special place for kids in my heart and decided to switch to pediatrics, and so I completed my training at Boston Children's Hospital.

Source: Medscape interview on 2014 Massachusetts governor's race Feb 18, 2014

Don Berwick: OpEd: "The second most dangerous man in America"

Don Berwick told reporters and voters at Suffolk University what kind of leader he would be if elected governor in November. The man conservative commentator Glenn Beck called, "the second most dangerous man in America" was bright, positive, and upbeat throughout the roundtable. He said he was looking forward to working with the Massachusetts legislature, but alluded to his tougher side. "If you disagree with me, I will fight you," Berwick told the Suffolk audience. "I'm not as nice as I look."

"The foundation of leadership is more values than strategy," said Berwick. "When the values are right and goals are bold, people want to do well. I will be the same in the corner office."

Berwick stressed his work in non-profits, where he studied other organizations and what makes them work better. "The most important decision an executive makes is who he or she selects to carry out the agenda you agree on," said Berwick. "My management style is to seek out the best people."

Source: Walpole Times on 2014 Massachusetts Governor race Jan 25, 2014

Mike Lee: Give me 17 months and I will achieve bipartisanship

Q: Can you win against Ed Markey?

GOMEZ: This election is about putting people before politics. Congressman Markey has had 37 years down there to get things done in terms of immigration reform, comprehensive tax reform, entitlement reform. Give me 17 months and I will keep my word and I don't need 37 years like Congressman Markey has had.

Q: 17 months is the time left in John Kerry's term, but you would be just one of 100 members of the Senate. How are you going to break the gridlock in Washington singlehandedly?

GOMEZ: If a Navy SEAL can talk a Peace Corps volunteer into marrying him, I think I can work with anybody. I look forward to working with President Obama, I look forward to working with all the senators in DC I have been bipartisan my whole life. That's the problem we have in DC right now. We have such a high level of cynicism, fiscal mismanagement and hyper partisanship. And the issues are so big that we need to reach across the aisle, respect the other side and get things done.

Source: Fox News Sunday on 2013 Massachusetts Senate debate Jun 23, 2013

Bob Massie: Overcame childhood hemophilia, hepatitis, and HIV

Bob Massie is an expert at overcoming hurdles in life. As a young boy he suffered from hemophilia and spent much of his childhood in braces, unable to walk. He contracted hepatitis and HIV after blood transfusions, \and needed a new liver to survive. He's offered himself to the Massachusetts General Hospital for medical studies--the results of which ushered in a new era of HIV research. He's left little time for self pity. He writes about his journey from sickly child to international philanthropist with grace and candor in his memoir, "A Song in the Night".

"My original title was `Surviving Hemophilia, HIV and Hepatitis.' It was so boring. I decided to take a totally different approach and tell five stories instead," says Massie. When asked about the medical timing, Massie notes, "If I had been born earlier, I would not have survived. If I had been born later, I wouldn't have \gotten HIV. The medical care was good enough to keep me going, but flawed.

Source: Time Magazine on 2018 Massachusetts governor race May 15, 2012

Karyn Polito: Voted YES on 'one nation under God' in pledge of allegiance

Massachusetts Democratic Party Platform indicates voting NO in Part I: CIVIL RIGHTS:Clause 7: Church & State. [State Rep. Polito, a Republican, voted YES].

A Resolution, filed by Rep. Jones (R, North Reading), would reaffirm the reference to "one nation under God" in the pledge of allegiance.

The relevant part of the MassDems Platform is Part I, clause 7: CIVIL RIGHTS AND CIVIL LIBERTIES: We reaffirm our commitment to the constitutional guarantee of separation of church and state, and of the freedom to worship without governmental interference.

Bill H.4402 ; vote number H205

Source: Massachusetts House voting record via MassScorecard.org Sep 20, 2005

Marty Walsh: Voted YES on 'one nation under God' in pledge of allegiance

Massachusetts Democratic Party Platform indicates voting NO in Part I: CIVIL RIGHTS:Clause 7: Church & State. [State Rep. Walsh, a Democrat, voted YES].

A Resolution, filed by Rep. Jones (R, North Reading), would reaffirm the reference to "one nation under God" in the pledge of allegiance.

The relevant part of the MassDems Platform is Part I, clause 7: CIVIL RIGHTS AND CIVIL LIBERTIES: We reaffirm our commitment to the constitutional guarantee of separation of church and state, and of the freedom to worship without governmental interference.

Bill H.4402 ; vote number H205

Source: Massachusetts House voting record via MassScorecard.org Sep 20, 2005

John Kerry: Contest between common sense values and extreme ideologues

This is not the normal contest of Democrats versus Republicans. This is a contest between common sense American values and extreme ideologues whose agenda is to dismantle 50 years of Democratic achievement and we’re not going to let them do it. Some people [say] that they can’t tell the difference between us and them. Well, the differences could not be more clear - the agenda could not be more compelling - and the stakes could not be higher. Our agenda is as clear as it is different and fairer.
Source: Keynote Speech to Massachusetts Democratic Issues Convention Jun 7, 2003

Carla Howell: Number one issue: Big government versus small government

Q: What is your number one campaign issue?

A: Big government versus small government. One simple issue, one simple choice. Big government problems, or small government solutions. Big government is the problem; small government is the solution. I am campaigning for small government. You either get big government and high taxes or small government and low taxes.

Source: Eric Darbe, Massachusetts News Jan 5, 2000

  • The above quotations are from Commonwealth of Massachusetts Politicians: secondary Archives.
  • Click here for definitions & background information on Principles & Values.
  • Click here for other issues (main summary page).
2016 Presidential contenders on Principles & Values:
  Republicans:
Gov.Jeb Bush(FL)
Dr.Ben Carson(MD)
Gov.Chris Christie(NJ)
Sen.Ted Cruz(TX)
Carly Fiorina(CA)
Gov.Jim Gilmore(VA)
Sen.Lindsey Graham(SC)
Gov.Mike Huckabee(AR)
Gov.Bobby Jindal(LA)
Gov.John Kasich(OH)
Gov.Sarah Palin(AK)
Gov.George Pataki(NY)
Sen.Rand Paul(KY)
Gov.Rick Perry(TX)
Sen.Rob Portman(OH)
Sen.Marco Rubio(FL)
Sen.Rick Santorum(PA)
Donald Trump(NY)
Gov.Scott Walker(WI)
Democrats:
Gov.Lincoln Chafee(RI)
Secy.Hillary Clinton(NY)
V.P.Joe Biden(DE)
Gov.Martin O`Malley(MD)
Sen.Bernie Sanders(VT)
Sen.Elizabeth Warren(MA)
Sen.Jim Webb(VA)

2016 Third Party Candidates:
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Roseanne Barr(PF-HI)
Robert Steele(L-NY)
Dr.Jill Stein(G,MA)
Please consider a donation to OnTheIssues.org!
Click for details -- or send donations to:
1770 Mass Ave. #630, Cambridge MA 02140
E-mail: submit@OnTheIssues.org
(We rely on your support!)

Page last updated: Feb 12, 2018