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Martin O`Malley on Foreign Policy

Democrat

 


Leave Cold War mentality to the older generation

May I offer a different generation's perspective on this? During the Cold War, we got into a bad habit of always looking to see who was wearing the jersey of the communists, and who was wearing the U.S. jersey. We got into a bad habit of creating big bureaucracies, old methodologies, to undermine regimes that were not friendly to the United States. Look what we did in Iran with Mosaddegh. And look at the results that we're still dealing with because of that. I would suggest to you that we need to leave the Cold War behind us, and we need to put together new alliances and new approaches to dealing with this. I know Secretary Clinton was gleeful when Gadhafi was torn apart. And the world, no doubt is a better place without him. But look, we didn't know what was happening next. And we fell into the same trap with Assad, as if it's our job to say, "Assad must go." We have a role to play in this world. But we need to leave the Cold War and that sort of antiquated thinking behind.
Source: 2015 ABC/WMUR Democratic primary debate in N.H. , Dec 19, 2015

Make USAID a cabinet agency, to get more intel

We have invested nowhere near what we should be investing in human intelligence on the ground. I'm talking about diplomatic intelligence. We do our military a disservice when we don't greatly dial up the investment that we are making in diplomacy and humint [human intelligence]. As president, I would make the administrator of USAID an actual cabinet member. We have to act in a much more whole of government approach.
Source: 2015 ABC/WMUR Democratic primary debate in N.H. , Dec 19, 2015

Need to move towards 'networked intelligence'

Q: Explain how your ISIS strategy differs from that of Secretary Clinton.

O`MALLEY: The terrorist attacks in Paris suggest that we do not have the networked intelligence that we need to defend ourselves. An immune system is strong not because it outnumbers the bad germs in this world but because it's better coordinated. That is not the old way of a CIA and siloed bureaucracies. It requires a new age of rapid communications and intelligence sharing with neighbors that, in the past, a lot of security agencies thought ran contrary to our national interests. When it comes, also, to fighting ISIL on the battlefields of Iraq and Syria, we need to up the battle tempo and we also need new alliances with many other nations that are open-ended and ideally work through the U.N. Security Council. It also requires an open-endedness to allow the Russians to come in and help us provided we can get that a short-term political solution that directs their firepower.

Source: ABC This Week 2015 interviews of 2016 presidential hopefuls , Nov 22, 2015

We should accept 65,000 Syrian refugees who are fleeing ISIL

Q [to Sen. SANDERS]: What's your view on Syrian refugees?

SANDERS: I believe that the US has the moral responsibility with Europe, with Gulf countries like Saudi Arabia to make sure that when people leave countries like Afghanistan and Syria with nothing more than the clothing on their back that, of course, we reach out. Now, what the magic number is, I don't know, because we don't know the extent of the problem.

Q: Gov. O'Malley, you have a magic number. I think it's 65,000.

O'MALLEY: I was the first person on this stage to say that we should accept the 65,000 Syrian refugees that were fleeing the sort of murder of ISIL, and I believe that that needs to be done with proper screening.

Q: 65,000, the number stays?

O`MALLEY: That's what I understand is the international request.

Q: But what would you want?

O`MALLEY: I would want us to take our place among the nations of the world to alleviate this sort of death and the specter we saw of little kids' bodies washing up on a beach.

Source: 2015 CBS Democratic primary debate on Syrian Refugees , Nov 14, 2015

New foreign policy of engagement and collaboration

We must construct a New National Security Strategy and build new alliances that are forward-seeing and forward-acting.

The center of this new strategy must be the reduction of threats. Fast-evolving threats--from violent extremism, pandemic, cyber attacks, nuclear proliferation, nation-state failures, to the drought, famine, and floods of climate change.

Together, we must craft a New Foreign Policy of Engagement and Collaboration. We must join with like-minded people around the world--especially with nations here in our own hemisphere--for the cause we share of a rising global middle class.

We must put our national interest first, we must put America first.

Source: 2016 presidential campaign website, MartinOMalley.com , May 30, 2015

Respect my right to shy away from foreign policy

On his 8-day trip to Israel, Jordan & the Palestinian territories, O'Malley said, "I'm sure all of you will ask me foreign policy questions. I respect your right to ask them, and I hope you'll respect my right to shy away from answering them."

On the news of the day--apparent differences between Obama and the Israeli military on whether chemical weapons had been deployed by the Syrian military--O'Malley deferred to the president's judgment. "It's certainly one of the great challenges," he allowed.

Asked whether the American people, weary from a decade of wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, would be ready to engage in another military operation to stop Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon, O'Malley avoided specifics. "I believe that the president will make that call," he said, "and the president will have the primary responsibility of making that case to the American people and also to Congress."

How about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? "All of us hope for peace in the Middle East."

Source: N.Y.Times on 2014 Maryland gubernatorial race , Apr 24, 2013

Israeli separation barrier might be called "peace wall"

Governor O'Malley, 50, said it was his third visit to Israel, and that he had brought with him about 50 high-tech executives, Jewish leaders, and Maryland officials for what is essentially a trade mission. After a side trip to Jordan in which he met with Prince Faisal--"What we spoke about was the huge challenge that the ongoing conflict in Syria has for the entire region"--much of his itinerary here is filled with companies that have offices in his home state, including one that makes radar for the vaunted Iron Dome missile defense system.

A reporter pointed out that on his way into Bethlehem, he would see the controversial separation barrier Israel has erected in the West Bank. O'Malley said he had seen something similar in Northern Ireland. "They call it the peace wall," he noted.

Source: N.Y.Times on 2014 Maryland gubernatorial race , Apr 24, 2013

Progressive Internationalism: globalize with US pre-eminence.

O`Malley adopted the manifesto, "A New Agenda for the New Decade":

Build a Public Consensus Supporting US Global Leadership
The internationalist outlook that served America and the world so well during the second half of the 20th century is under attack from both ends of the political spectrum. As the left has gravitated toward protectionism, many on the right have reverted to “America First” isolationism.

Our leaders should articulate a progressive internationalism based on the new realities of the Information Age: globalization, democracy, American pre-eminence, and the rise of a new array of threats ranging from regional and ethnic conflicts to the spread of missiles and biological, chemical, and nuclear weapons. This approach recognizes the need to revamp, while continuing to rely on, multilateral alliances that advance U.S. values and interests.

A strong, technologically superior defense is the foundation for US global leadership. Yet the US continues to employ defense strategies, military missions, and force structures left over from the Cold War, creating a defense establishment that is ill-prepared to meet new threats to our security. The US must speed up the “revolution in military affairs” that uses our technological advantage to project force in many different contingencies involving uncertain and rapidly changing security threats -- including terrorism and information warfare.

Source: The Hyde Park Declaration 00-DLC12 on Aug 1, 2000

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Page last updated: Aug 18, 2016